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Linux-Based Musical Keyboard Workstation Debuts 184

Posted by simoniker
from the thing-ized-thing dept.
Henry G. writes "Lionstracs of Italy has released the Mediastation X-76 music workstation. It runs Red Hat and KDE 3.1. The base model features a 1.67 Ghz Athlon, 512MB RAM, 80GB HD, CDRW/DVD-ROM, 8.2" LCD, and a host of other things. Full specs can be found here and pictures can be found here. To this submitter, it looks more like a keyboardized computer than a computerized keyboard."
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Linux-Based Musical Keyboard Workstation Debuts

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  • by Drubber (60345) on Monday November 10, 2003 @05:25PM (#7437381)
    Actually, it doesn't look any more computerized than many other keyboard workstations out there (e.g., Yamaha Motif). The fact that you can hook up external LCDs, etc. in order to more fully exploit what's under the hood will put it a generation beyond.
  • Man.... (Score:0, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday November 10, 2003 @05:26PM (#7437394)
    Why does Slashdot go nuts over anything running Linux? I mean yeah, it's nice to see Linux being used everywhere but it's not big news.

    Shameless plug:
    Blogzine [blogzine.net]
  • by StaticEngine (135635) on Monday November 10, 2003 @05:41PM (#7437600) Homepage
    From a musician's standpoint, I doubt many would care what OS their sound-making device is running. Most musicians just want a device that is stable, affordable, and sounds like they want it to sound. Lots of coveted synths (say, the Access Virus C) run an embedded OS, and musicians are totally happy with that.

    With software synths (Reason, Reaktor, plus the various VST and DXi synths available) gaining in popularity, a laptop and a small USB keyboard are all many electronic musicians need to get going. Factor into this the low cost (since downloading of MP3s is killing small/new artists more than it harms anyone associated with the RIAA), and the fact that even electronic musicians are not highly technically savvy ("Yo, mate, I plugged my 'board into the Insert Jack on this Mackie, becuase I want to Insert the sound, right?"), musicians will tend to go with what everyone else is using because then support is easy to find. Unless some new device offers some unique and killer sound with a dirt simple or intuitive user interface, it's just another box destined to fade into obscurity.
  • by Entropy248 (588290) on Monday November 10, 2003 @05:52PM (#7437750) Journal
    Yeah, we care about Linux. We care that it doesn't run Pro Tools well (or at all?), (as far as I know) does not support USB output of audio, does not run any quality professional software, and will not be supported by most major soundcard manufacturers.
  • by cerebralpc (705727) on Monday November 10, 2003 @05:56PM (#7437805)
    Musos care about cost. And Linux is cheap.
    Musos also care about drivers and unfortunately Linux doesn't deliver on this like Windows does.
  • by marsu_k (701360) on Monday November 10, 2003 @07:39PM (#7438880)
    Most musicians just want a device that is stable, affordable, and sounds like they want it to sound.
    True, and Linux would fit the bill when it comes to stability and affordability. As to "sounding like they want it to sound", A/D or D/A conversion with the same sound card should produce the same results regardless of the OS. You can get ALSA support for most contemporary sound cards. But yes, VST plugin support sucks in Linux at the moment. I wish it were otherwise. Give me even a half decent multitrack with an ability to use VST effects (I really don't care that much for soft synths) and I'd remove my Windows partition. Until then I'll stick to my dual-boot box. I wish it were otherwise.
    even electronic musicians are not highly technically savvy ("Yo, mate, I plugged my 'board into the Insert Jack on this Mackie, becuase I want to Insert the sound, right?")
    Stop reading dancetech.com :-) We're not that stupid.

Faith may be defined briefly as an illogical belief in the occurence of the improbable. - H. L. Mencken

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