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H2G2 Cast Finalized, Starts Shooting in April 541

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the please-don't-sscrew-it-up dept.
akahige writes "According to The Hollywood Reporter, Martin Freeman (The Office, Love Actually), Mos Def (Showtime, The Italian Job), and Zooey Deschanel (Big Trouble, Elf) have signed on to play Arthur, Ford, and Trillian, respectively. Stephen Moore is once again doing the voice of Marvin. No word on who's playing Zaphod (but wouldn't Eddie Izzard be great?). It worries me when they say things like, "Adams adapted his own novel for the screen. After his death, Karey Kirkpatrick came aboard for a rewrite." But it's Disney, so what do you expect? Shooting begins in April."
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H2G2 Cast Finalized, Starts Shooting in April

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  • by grub (11606) <slashdot@grub.net> on Thursday January 29, 2004 @05:31PM (#8127923) Homepage Journal

    But it's Disney, so what do you expect?

    Probably not what you expect..

    Multiple Hitchiker toys at (McDonalds|Burger King) so people have to make several visits to buy them all.

    Perhaps a Hitchiker Ride at Disney World if the movie proves very successful.

    A DVD release followed soon after by a "collectors edition" release.

    A re-release of the books all spiffied up for the new consumers.

    A movie where quality will be second to the marketting of junk collectibles.

    bah.. /. needs a "+1, Cynical Bastard" mod.

    • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday January 29, 2004 @05:35PM (#8127986)
      Yeah, I love Douglas Adams and I like that he's popular, without becoming too non-geeky. You can tell a lot about a person if they know anything about Douglas Adams' books. Now every four year old is going to have seen a movie about it, robbing them even of the chance to experience the wonderful world of Douglas Adams *first hand*. I can not imagine what it would be like if I hadn't read the books first and based everything off a movie...

      This would be one of the worst things that could happen to a kid, literarily. Douglas Adams was a memorable portion of my adolescence escape.
      • Lord of the Rings. 'Nuff said.
      • by grub (11606) <slashdot@grub.net> on Thursday January 29, 2004 @05:40PM (#8128056) Homepage Journal
        Now every four year old is going to have seen a movie about it, robbing them even of the chance to experience the wonderful world of Douglas Adams *first hand*.

        So true. I'd love to know the stats of the people which paid to see the LotR trilogy multiple times, bought the various DVD editions, plastic cups from some fast-food dive but haven't read the books and have no intention of doing so.
        I'm not knocking Jackson or the movies, I think he did as good a job as could have been done, but no amount of CGI can beat the infinite movie screen of the imagination when fueled by a good book.
        • by Golias (176380)
          I'd love to know the stats of the people which paid to see the LotR trilogy multiple times, bought the various DVD editions, plastic cups from some fast-food dive but haven't read the books and have no intention of doing so.

          Here's your stats:

          Total: 0.
          Margin of error: Not enough to worry about.

          People who have not read the books tend to see them each once at the theater, and come out saying "a pretty good action flick, but kinda slow at times."

          The psycho-fans who are buying little Gollum statues and set

          • Re:What to expect.. (Score:5, Informative)

            by TexVex (669445) on Thursday January 29, 2004 @06:14PM (#8128464)
            People who have not read the books tend to see them each once at the theater, and come out saying "a pretty good action flick, but kinda slow at times."


            The movie Starship Troopers actually spurred sales of the original novel Starship Troopers. Despite the movie being a horrible rendition of the book (emphasis on the "rend"). I may be mistaken but I think the movie actually launched the book back into the bestseller lists (the first time would be when it was first published and won a Hugo award).
        • by NickFusion (456530) on Thursday January 29, 2004 @06:37PM (#8128746) Homepage
          Yes, everyone says that your own imagination is better than anything you'll see at the movies.

          Bah.

          Look at the credits for LotR. We're talking about 100s of professional dreamers, all channeling their combined skills into one magnificent creative act.

          They beat me. Their world was more brilliantly imagined, more consistently detailed than my lone brain could come up with reading those books as a kid.

          I think this is lazy-speak for another phenomemon. When you read a book, you are triggering fundamentally different feelings than you get watching a movie. There is a pleasure in reading that you don't get from film (and, I think, the converse is true).

          But, yes, I admit it. the combined talents of all the creative folk on LotR bested my imagination.

          Kudos to them. And good luck to the H2G2 crew, they have a big job ahead of them.
          • They did not best my own personal imagination. Some (but by no means all) of the reasons:

            1. A movie has to be everything to all people, and this necessitates many trade-offs. My hypothetical best story is different from yours, and there are more people out there who would be happy with some lasers and rocket engines than would be happy Adams' superlative wit, just like there were more people who thought the Scouring of the Shire was an unnecessary add-on to the story than thought, like the author did, th
      • Re:What to expect.. (Score:3, Informative)

        by netringer (319831)
        I can not imagine what it would be like if I hadn't read the books first and based everything off a movie...
        I may be wrong, but as I remember HHGG was a BBC radio serial script first. Then it was a BBC TV mini-series. THEN it was a book. The book might have come before the TV show. All the versions were slightly different.

        Maybe the radio listeners thought the visual versions ruined it for THEM!

      • by pyros (61399) on Thursday January 29, 2004 @05:53PM (#8128241) Journal
        My first exposure to Adams was as a child, seeing it on television in England. I didn't read the books until the past 5 years, and I think they were more enjoyable, because I had seen some of the TV stuff already. Anyone who wants to read the books still can. Anyone who wouldn't have read them anyways won't be missing out if they see the movie instead. Take a deep breath and relax.
      • You can tell a lot about a person if they know anything about Douglas Adams' books.
        Yeah, just ask them if they can figure out how the couch got stuck in the stairwell. If the don't know, then pass 'em by.

    • "A movie where quality will be second to the marketting of junk collectibles."

      Yeah, but the collectables might be worth something in like 2000 years. I want to save them in the origional package.
      • A movie where quality will be second to the marketting of junk collectibles

        ah disney. they took victor hugo's classic "the hunchback of notre dame" and gave us...

        the lunchbox of notre dame.

    • by grahams (5366) on Thursday January 29, 2004 @05:38PM (#8128018) Homepage
      Perhaps a Hitchiker Ride at Disney World if the movie proves very successful.
      Yeah, and then 20 years from now they will make a movie based on the ride.
    • by petabyte (238821) on Thursday January 29, 2004 @05:38PM (#8128027)
      bah.. /. needs a "+1, Cynical Bastard" mod.

      I believe its called "insightful" :)
    • by thegoofy (301855) on Thursday January 29, 2004 @05:41PM (#8128074)
      Yes, I can see the advertising blitz now...

      "Towels in the kids meals - Yes, Kids! You can hide from your parents simply by placing this over your head!"

      "This weeks special, the so long and thanks for all the McFish"

    • by adler187 (448837)
      That would be McDonalds. I used to work at BK so I would know. BK only has the crappy Nickelodeon toys and other Non-Disney animation toys. And they wonder why BK sales are worse than MDonalds.

      I once had a lady ask me if the most important part of her kid's Kids Meal was in there as I handed her food out the Drive-Thru window. I asked her what the most important part was, and she said, "The Toy of course!" Kids dont care about the food, its all about the toy. Just my $.2
      • Re:What to expect.. (Score:2, Informative)

        by grub (11606)

        ..and she said, "The Toy of course!" Kids dont care about the food, its all about the toy.

        I highly recommend you read Fast Food Nation [amazon.com]. The author goes into some detail about marketting to children. Some parts are a bit alarmist but overall it's a thought-provoking read.
    • You forgot.........

      and

      * Profit!
    • Re:What to expect.. (Score:5, Informative)

      by Iffy Bonzoolie (1621) <iffy@x a r b le.org> on Thursday January 29, 2004 @06:02PM (#8128335) Journal
      cross-posting this from IMDB boards (yay, a quote of a quote of a quote):

      by The Duke of Dunstable [imdb.com]:

      For those of you who are worried about the Disney involvement of the movie, here's what Douglas said about it in December, 1998.

      "First of all, I have not tried to 'downplay' Disney's role in this. Disney is the studio which is making this movie, which is financing it, which will be distributing it. It couldn't really be much more central to the project.

      What I have tried to explain is that people's ideas of who or what Disney is is a little out of date. Yes, it made Bambi and Snow White and Flubber, but it also made Pulp Fiction, The Rock, etc., etc. It is a huge entertainment corporation, one part of which still makes what it originally made, i.e. family entertainment. So to talk about 'Disney-fying' Hitchhiker makes as much sense as saying 'Columbia-fying' it or 'Universal-fying' it. Yes, each studio has its strengths and weaknesses at any moment, depending on who's running what, but generalisations based on Bambi no longer apply. The important issues as far as I'm concerned is - who are the individual people I'm working with? The director, the producer, the studio executive etc. As things stand at the moment, I'm feeling very happy, confident and well looked after. But we have a huge task and huge challenges. Let's see how it goes."
    • by YOU LIKEWISE FAIL IT (651184) on Thursday January 29, 2004 @06:05PM (#8128372) Homepage Journal
      Multiple Hitchiker toys at (McDonalds|Burger King) so people have to make several visits to buy them all.

      I will gleefully whore out my favourite childhood novel if I can get a plastic Vogon figure with my Bugblatter Burger of Traal.

      YLFI
    • by jafac (1449) on Thursday January 29, 2004 @06:25PM (#8128607) Homepage
      Don't forget the lawyers putting the kibosh on the Babelfish and Learning to Fly, due to potential liability lawsuits ("My son Bobby put a Trout in his ear, and now he's deaf. I want 25 million dollars!" or "My daughter Suzie jumped off the roof trying to miss the ground, and broke her neck, and I want 50 million dollars!")

      So, the Babelfish will need to be wrapped in a towel and placed on the head,
      and Flying? well, with Disney, we're talking about at faerie dust, right?

    • by allrong (445675) on Thursday January 29, 2004 @06:43PM (#8128823) Homepage
      Surely the mice won't all look like Mickey will they? So long and thanks for all the Nemo?
  • Disney (Score:5, Funny)

    by funny-jack (741994) on Thursday January 29, 2004 @05:32PM (#8127930) Homepage
    But it's Disney, so what do you expect?

    Umm... a happy ending?
  • by phoenix321 (734987) on Thursday January 29, 2004 @05:32PM (#8127933)
    After his death, Karey Kirkpatrick came aboard for a rewrite.

    Written in hell. No doubt...
  • With all the Lord of the Rings ads, I was a little confused about what I was looking at. Usually pictures about the story accompany the story...
  • Would he have one head with makeup, and the other without? - Cake or Death, Little Red Cookbook!
  • Elf (Score:2, Funny)

    by Dreadlord (671979)
    Zooey Deschanel (Big Trouble, Elf)

    Wow, I didn't know that the elves started to do movies for Hollywood ;)
  • H2G2 (Score:5, Informative)

    by Archangel Michael (180766) on Thursday January 29, 2004 @05:33PM (#8127955) Journal
    For those who don't know ...

    HitchHikers Guide to the Galaxy

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/h2g2/guide/
    • by yoz (3735) on Thursday January 29, 2004 @08:47PM (#8130004) Homepage
      Heavy sigh...

      h2g2 (note the lower-casing) is the name of the online guide inspired by The Hitch Hiker's Guide To The Galaxy. It's considered "official" because it was created by The Digital Village Ltd., the new media company that had Douglas Adams amongst its directors, and he assisted in its creation. It is not the name of the book, the radio series, the game, or anything else. Just the online, fact-based guide.

      If you want to reference the fictional story or Guide with an abbreviation, I'd recommend HHGTTG. Or HHGG. Or HHG.

      -- Yoz, who was one of the four original developers of h2g2.com, and is also horrifically pedantic
  • On the studios... (Score:5, Interesting)

    by brucmack (572780) on Thursday January 29, 2004 @05:33PM (#8127962)
    But it's Disney, so what do you expect?

    Adams on this subject in The Salmon of Doubt:

    "The Hollywood process is like trying to grill a steak by having a succession of people coming into the room and breathing on it."
  • by AvantLegion (595806) on Thursday January 29, 2004 @05:34PM (#8127970) Journal
    ... what the appeal behind Hitchhiker's Guide is, and where one should start if it sounds good to them (books? radio? Infocom games?)

    What was it that drew everyone to Hitchhiker's? Or did some people gain interest just from all of the different forms?

    • Go get the book [bizrate.com]. The games and other media can wait.
    • I'm only familiar with the books. But they're really good. Start with the first one (aptly titled The Hitchhiker's Guide to The Galaxy). Then read the second, third, fourth, and fifth books in the ``increasingly innacurately named Hitchhiker's Trilogy''. Assuming you enjoy the first one. Which you will.

      The reason the books are popular is because they are outlandish and enjoyable satire. Very comedic, very fun, very radical. A good read.

    • You should start with that wholly remarkable book, "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy". And get yourself a towel.
    • My uncle bought me "The more than complete Hitchiker's Guide", which contained all four books and that fifth one no one really likes to talk about. The books are easily the funniest thing I've ever read.

      The Infocom game, IMO, is just about the most frustrating thing known to mankind, even for someone who's read the books many times.
    • Start with the books. i was first introduced to it/them through the Infocom game sometime in elementary school. I didn't quite understand the jokes or what was going on (why do i have to put the towel over my head again?) until I had read the book. Which I think I read concurrently with the game after I couldn't get past the introduction of the game. Haven't ever listened to the radio play...

      One can play the game online here [elsewhere.org].
    • What drew me to the Hitchhikers Guide series?

      Humor would have to be number one.
      Unpredictability would be second.

      Adams takes the reader on many twists and turns to wind up where we least expect.

      My favorite aspect of the books is how a single event in one book can be later explained in another book from a wildly different perspective (e.g. a bowl of petunias thinking "not again" in one book is not explained until a later book).
      • What drew me to the Hitchhikers Guide series?

        For me, I was in middle school and the Book Fair came into the library, offering to sell us all books. I remember seeing 12" LP's for this "Hitchhiker's Guide" thing and wondering what it was all about - and one of the books for sale was H2G2, so I bought it (amusingly, it reccomended "mature audiences"). Been hooked ever since.

        For the uninitiated, go into any bookstore in America and look for the "Ultimate Hitchhiker's Guide" [barnesandnoble.com] - one volume, five+ books, $15.

    • Start with the books (Score:3, Informative)

      by StringBlade (557322)
      Unless you're attention span is so limited or work better audibly. The books have more detail than even the books on tape (sometimes) and you can read at your own pace.

      Additionally, the first three books are the best (Hithchiker's Guide to the Galaxy; Resturant at the end of the Universe; and Life, the Universe, and Everything -- I may have mixed up the order of the last two). So Long and Thanks For All the Fish and Mostly Harmless are ok, but get worse and worse. The trilogy probably would have been be

    • by kalidasa (577403) * on Thursday January 29, 2004 @06:49PM (#8128887) Journal

      Read the first three books first, in order (*Hitchiker's Guide*, *Restaurant at the End of the Universe*, and *Life the Universe, and Everything*). Then listen to the radio shows (it is vitally important that you listen to the radio shows and read the books BEFORE you watch the BBC television series). I'd suggest the books first because they are the highest quality, even if the radio series is the fons et origo. Note that there are important differences in the organization of the books and the radio series: but you'll be able to see how DNA reworked the material for the books, and will hear the actors rather than seeing them.

      After that, watch the BBC series. The BBC cast used mostly the folks from the radio cast. Thing is, they're radio actors, and they act like radio actors - their movement, blocking, etc. are all a little stiff, even if their voices are superb. Also, the budget was very tight, and the production quality (special effects, sets, wardrobe, and especially the prosthetic head) leaves much to be desired.

      Next, read two stories that appear in *The Salmon of Doubt*. The first is "Young Zaphod Plays it Safe* - the version in *Salmon of Doubt* is uncensored in the US, while the on in the *Ultimate Hitchiker's Guide* and the other omnibus editions are censored in the US so that the ending leaves you a little confused (the last line is dropped). The second (though probably the oldest story of all, though I never checked on it) is "The Private Life of Ghenghis Khan".

      After you've read those, it's time to read *So Long, and Thanks for All the Fish*. Enjoy. This one is a little more surreal than anything else, but it's still pretty damned funny (the biscuit story, which is absolutely realistic, is funny as hell).

      Now, wait until some time when you're in such a good mood that nothing, not enough universal apocalypse, will make you sad. Get your favorite blanky out of the attic, and call up your significant other and ask him/her/shim/sher to remain on standby for a call. You are now prepared to read the last book, *Mostly Harmless*. The whole book is very, very dark, even though it is still quite funny. A lot of people hated it because the ending is rather depressing, and there's some retroactive continuity that's stretched a bit thin, but if you're over 30 you'll get it right away (if not, I've got terrible news for you: this is what life is like).

      Then go out and get yourself a nice glass of orange juice and a breakfast sandwich. It will cheer you up.

  • by Xolotl (675282) on Thursday January 29, 2004 @05:34PM (#8127972) Journal
    Disney did The Pirates of the Caribbean" [imdb.com]. If they do HHG with the same degree of style (and don't screw with it too much) it might be quite good.
  • by Dimensio (311070) <darkstar&iglou,com> on Thursday January 29, 2004 @05:34PM (#8127978)
    I admit that I'm not a fanatic like some, but I have never heard that particular string used as a short way to refer to the Hitchiker's Guide series. I've seen HHGttG once or twice, but usually I just see the whole thing written out.

    It took me a moment to figure out the meaning of the headline. I had to actually read some of the additional commentary. If I had to actually read some of the commentary before posting on all articles, how could I shoot off an ill-informed comment that so blatantly exposes my ignorance?
    • H2G2 is the name Adams used for the Hitchikers website (h2g2.com) now owned by the BBC. That was the first I heard of it, but I think it's pretty common now.
    • I admit that I'm not a fanatic like some, but I have never heard that particular string used as a short way to refer to the Hitchiker's Guide series. I've seen HHGttG once or twice, but usually I just see the whole thing written out.

      So I'm guessing you've never been to h2g2.com.

      It's about as official as it gets.

  • by xao gypsie (641755) on Thursday January 29, 2004 @05:35PM (#8127980)
    ....what company will be supplying the towel???
    • by Dr. Zowie (109983) * <slashdotNO@SPAMdeforest.org> on Thursday January 29, 2004 @07:02PM (#8129007)
      ... where his towel was. It was in a large auditorium at the University of California (San Diego). He was talking about his new book, "So Long, and Thanks for All The Fish". It turned out that he didn't know where it was. But about half of the audience happened to have brought theirs, and started waving them about... :-)

      The towel story, he said, came from being on an extended vacation in Greece and never having a towel with him when his buddies wanted to go to the beach. The cooler folks always seemed to have theirs along.

  • having never read H2G2 i got to say now i whole lot more OSS and freeware product names make sense. until i read comments and what H2G2 ment i was truely baffled about what hollywood had to do with my favorite chat client.
  • When I read the story, Arthur was black and Ford was chinese. How dare they change the characters all around!

    (And what's with them removing the Dutch accent that all the Orcs had in LotR? Everyone knows that's how they talked!)
  • I've got low hopes (Score:3, Insightful)

    by KrispyKringle (672903) on Thursday January 29, 2004 @05:36PM (#8127999)
    Somehow, things that were anti-establishment, outlandish, and unique seem to lose that anti-establishment fun when they're reproduced by a major motion picture studio.

    It always seems like they spend less time poking fun at things like how major motion picture studios do product placement and regurgitate the same old shit and spend more time doing product placement and regurgitating the same old shit.

    But I don't know. Maybe I'm just being cynical. After all, it's Disney! The people who brought us Brother Bear and, uh...yeah, Brother Bear!

  • I think I preferred the casting for LOTR. Martin Freeman looks like a good pick for Arthur, but the actors chosen for Ford and Trillian just do not fit my mental image.
  • Keaton as Zaphod? (Score:3, Interesting)

    by Wraithlyn (133796) on Thursday January 29, 2004 @05:37PM (#8128013)
    Once upon a time I read that Micahel Keaton was their choice for Zaphod. I think he'd be great. :) This was years and years ago though.
    • That would be a cool choice. The last time this came up on Slashdot someone made a pretty good case for Bruce Campbell... and had me convinced it was a good idea. :)
    • Perhaps years ago, I think he's a little past his prime to pull of a really hoopy frood like Zaphod. Taco's suggestion of Eddie Izzard is great, though it's likely another in a long line of false rumors/ruined hopes that he would play everything from Dr. Who to the next Bond (in heels!).
  • by wildsurf (535389) on Thursday January 29, 2004 @05:38PM (#8128016) Homepage
    I never could get the hang of Thursdays.
  • But it's Disney (Score:2, Interesting)

    by frovingslosh (582462)
    But it's Disney, so what do you expect?

    Nothing. Loved the books. Enjoyed the BBC video, enjoyed the BBC radio play. Will not have it ruined by Disney and their idea of a rewrite. I'm so opposed to seeing this that I wouldn't even download it from the web.

  • by elsilver (85140) on Thursday January 29, 2004 @05:39PM (#8128038) Homepage
    It worries me when they say things like,...

    Don't Panic.

    E.

  • by onyxruby (118189) <onyxruby@@@comcast...net> on Thursday January 29, 2004 @05:39PM (#8128040)
    I think my head shall explode. Have loved the books for longer than I can remember. I even adapted part of one book for a play in college - went over well. Have also been boycotting Disney for longer than I can remember. Refuse to give them any money since long before their whole DRM, MPAA etc behavior. Head going to explode! Have I been sent to hell, with this as my punishment?
  • by EverStoned (620906) on Thursday January 29, 2004 @05:41PM (#8128064) Homepage
    That's gonna be a tough one to pull off..
  • by tweder (22759) <{moc.liamg} {ta} {edewts}> on Thursday January 29, 2004 @05:41PM (#8128070) Homepage
    Does the casting for Ford Prefect seem odd to anyone else? At least when I read the books, I NEVER pictured Ford Prefect to look like this [imdb.com].
    • I thought that too, however since Ford is not even human (or at least not from Earth), insisting he be white and speak with a Britishaccent is a little limiting. After all, Ford grew up with Zaphod, right? Zaphod grew a third arm and second head on a whim, right?

      • For me, given that it was a radio series first, I'll go with your first but not your second point.

        To expand a little. Yes Ford can be what ever colour you like, NAP. But Douglas Adams was a _very_ English writer, and if he wrote Ford with an English accent (witness accents on original BBC Radio4 series: mostly, but not entirely, English accents), I'd prefer it to stay that way.

        That said, without DNA to keep the director/movie corp in line, I'm re-jigging my expectations for the film.

        Disney doing subtle mi

    • It's not strange, just imagine Chicken George in Roots being played by Jim Carrey. It makes perfect sense. You are just being racist with you anglo-centric mind.
  • zaphod actor (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Stinking Pig (45860) on Thursday January 29, 2004 @05:43PM (#8128100) Homepage
    really, really ought to be Tim Curry.
  • by Dolemite_the_Wiz (618862) on Thursday January 29, 2004 @05:44PM (#8128115) Journal
    The last thing Hollywood needs is another crappy adaptation of cool Sci-Fi media by Will Smith. Wild, Wild, Wild West and MIB were enough.

    Dolemite
    _________________________
  • ...that can't be good.
  • by TheMonkeyDepartment (413269) on Thursday January 29, 2004 @05:44PM (#8128120)
    Throughout the history of H2G2, Douglas Adams adapted and re-adapted his works to multiple media. Starting with a radio show, moving to books and TV, even a computer game -- with every adaptation, he fearlessly changed it around as he saw fit, to embrace the strengths of the medium. The computer game is not the same material as the book, which is totally different from the radio series, etc. etc.

    In other words, The Hitchhiker's Guide To The Galaxy series is all about change. If the movie is 100% faithful to the books, I'll be very disappointed. I want them to switch it around a little bit, give us some of the stuff we love, but also some new stuff too.

    I want to see the wonderful spirit of H2G2 and the sense of humor of Douglas Adams accurately reflected in these movies. If that's done, I don't care if Ford is black, if Arthur Dent is Latino, if Trillian is played by Queen Latifah or if Fenchurch is played by Harvey Fierstein.
    • by Kjella (173770) on Thursday January 29, 2004 @06:19PM (#8128527) Homepage
      Throughout the history of H2G2, Douglas Adams adapted and re-adapted his works to multiple media.

      And you can beat your ass that no matter what anyone else does, it'll be shot down in flames. Just look at all the things they had to change in LotR - if JRR Tolkien had been there and said "We need to do this to make it work on the screen" noone would have complained. But even the things that were absolutely necessary got flamed from here to the moon.

      Besides, I'd love to see a good movie version of it as it is, I have the TV series. I just hope they can keep it just as British as the original, not hollywoodify it (as seems to happen to so many movies, whether they were made there or not). And at the same time give me some dazzling CG graphics, a proper 2nd head and third arm on Zaphod (real ones, just CGI attached).

      I really hope they can do it. Like that scene where they approach Magrathea, and the book steps in to tell the audience that noone will get hurt in the impending rocket attack. It's as un-hollywoodish as can be. And I love them for it.

      Kjella
  • by ausoleil (322752) on Thursday January 29, 2004 @05:45PM (#8128134) Homepage
    So after the Lord of the Rings, comes another well-regarded piece of literature in the Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy. Hollywood did well by LOTR, let's hope "they" learned their lesson and will let a piece of classic writing stand on it's own and not try to stuff the story into a 2-hour formula.

    My great fear of this is that the wit, sarcasm and anti-religious rage will be written out and instead, we'll get...Spy Kids in Space. The anti-religious part will be the first to go, otherwise Pat Robertson will be ranting and railing on Fox News about a horrible, blasephemous film coming from that esteemed home of children's entertainment, Disney. But it's a part of 'The Guide' and should stay in. Otherwise, it becomes...something else.

    On the other hand, I suppose Disney should be given a little benefit of the doubt, after all, Pirates of the Caribbean was a highly entertaining film.

    It will interesting to see what happens with this. I was hoping secretly Peter Jackson would handle the director's chair, given the respect he gave LOTR as literature. To me, Hitchhiker's Guide is a classic and should not be "messed with."

    • by Dr. Zowie (109983) * <slashdotNO@SPAMdeforest.org> on Thursday January 29, 2004 @07:08PM (#8129058)
      I heard Adams speak, in 1984, about the television series and, in particular, the HHG sequences within the series. Those sequences were all hand-animated (since computer graphics were actually expensive then!). He talked about how he saw the initial draft animations, and figured that that they were too complex for an American audience (in keeping with conventional Hollywood wisdom). Then he happened to be in the U.S. (maybe to cut a deal for the series, I forget why) and spotted some teenagers playing video games. That was the time when Xevious, Defender, and Sinistar were all the rage. Adams went back to the studio, he told us, and insisted that they redo the animations to make them more complicated.


      Here's hoping the creative/adaptive tam here has the same spirit of humorous overload!

  • Offtopic but, I really like Mos Def's music, I watched the Italian Job and had no idea that was him. Wow he is extremely talented, should be a good film.
  • So I guess (Score:5, Funny)

    by iminplaya (723125) <iminplaya.gmail@com> on Thursday January 29, 2004 @05:58PM (#8128289) Journal
    we're not going to boycott disney anytime soon, eh?
  • by thelizman (304517) <.hammerattack. .at. .yahoo.com.> on Thursday January 29, 2004 @06:04PM (#8128359) Homepage
    ...why not, it worked in blazing saddles...
  • by NanoGator (522640) on Thursday January 29, 2004 @06:12PM (#8128454) Homepage Journal
    "No word on who's playing Zaphod (but wouldn't Eddie Izzard be great?"

    I nominate Darl McBride, he's already two-faced!
  • by MROD (101561) on Thursday January 29, 2004 @06:14PM (#8128468) Homepage
    Well, by-passes are out.. the American 13-18 male demographic don't know what they are.

    You can't have drinking to excess (even if it is with peanuts to help offset matter transfer and hyperspace) in a teenager film, so that's out.. It'll have to be Coca-Cola/Pepsi and Doritos instead.

    The mid-western 13-18 male demographic wont understand probability, so the infinite improbability drive is out. It must be the particle of the month, just like Star Trek.

    Satire isn't funny enough. Eddie the ship board computer will have to be smutty and/or throw custard pies. Marvin will be the cheery, slapstic C3PO look-alike.

    I'll just go and drink a Pan-Galactic Gargle Blaster (tm) (c)Zaphod Beeblebrox, (available at a seedy space ranger's bar near you) and drown my sorrows. (Oh, and that'll be canned as well!)
  • by iapetus (24050) on Thursday January 29, 2004 @06:36PM (#8128731) Homepage
    I thought everyone knew that Fords could be any colour you like, as long as they're black...
  • by cens0r (655208) on Thursday January 29, 2004 @06:41PM (#8128799) Homepage
    Just remember that this is actually being developed by Spy Glass Entertainment which is a subsidiary of Disney. Saying that the movie will suck because of Disney's involvement is like saying that ABC and ESPN are horrible because Disney is involved. Spyglass is the arm of disney responsible for The Insider, Seabiscut, The Sixth Sense, and Unbreakable among others. Now you may or may not like those movies, but I don't think they were especially Disneyfied. Saying that this is a Disney picture is like saying Kill Bill is a Disney picture simply because disney owns Miramax.
  • by tklancer (6643) on Thursday January 29, 2004 @06:46PM (#8128860) Homepage
    For those of you that are interested, KCRW has the original BBC Hitchhiker's Guide radio series up, accessible via RealWhatever.

    The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, by Douglas Adams [kcrw.org]

    Now, please refrain from slashdotting it until I've gone home for the day. I'm trying to listen to Fit the Third.

  • My .02 (Score:3, Insightful)

    by presearch (214913) on Thursday January 29, 2004 @09:19PM (#8130282)
    I wish that Terry Gilliam would have been chosen as director.
    This movie treatment deserves to be something special/spectacular.

    also

    DNA narrated all of his books for Dove audio, and added (again) something special.
    It would be lovely if they would his voiceover for narration or for the guide itself.

To thine own self be true. (If not that, at least make some money.)

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