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Slashback: XPiracy, Panel, Gentoo 335

Posted by timothy
from the hi-there-anna-in-the-library dept.
Slashback is back, with a boatload of updates, clarifications, and corrections to make previous Slashdot stories make more sense. This week, there are bits on BitKeeper, Microsoft's update policy when it comes to illegally copied versions of Windows, a change in schedule for an upcoming games panel, and more. Read on for the details.

The real requirements for Longhorn, at least at this juncture. Cryoknight writes "It seems that Longhorn will run on almost anything that's a P4 or better, judging by this article from C|Net News. You only need a 64mb graphics card to run the slickest version..."

(That's in contrast with earlier reports that the average Longhorn system would be hefty indeed; of course, listed minimums and recommendations are often worlds apart.)

How many bits could Mandrake chuck if Mandrake could chuck bits? Shipud writes "Speaking of AMD beating Intel, Mandrake have just released their v.10 for AMD64. Claiming to be on the average 20% faster, and compatible with 32-bit applications." As usual, it's never a good time to buy a computer.

The War Of The Word, Part II Random Guru 42 writes "Chris Pratley, whose earlier blog entry was the source of much discussion [referring to this Slashdot post of April 27], has just recently replied to everyone's feedback both here and as comments on that earlier entry."

Gentoo Community Reaches Out to Daniel Robbins nporter writes "Slashdot reported the news that Daniel Robbins has stepped down as chief architect of Gentoo Linux. It was revealed that due to his commitment to Gentoo he racked up a hefty personal debt of $20,000. The Gentoo Community is showing its appreciation to its founder in droves by placing donations to the Gentoo Store, proceeds of which will go toward paying down Robbins' debt. I count over a thousand dollars (and growing rapidly) has already been donated, just based upon posts to the forums. It's great to see Linux users coming together like this to show support for someone who has contributed so much to the Linux community."

Bitkeeper redux, redux. gosand writes "Part two of the two-part interview with Bitkeeper author Larry McVoy is up at Newsforge. (Part 1 was posted here yesterday). They essentially talk about why and how BK fits into the kernel development model. There are only two questions, one answered by Larry, and one answered by Linus. Maybe that is because BK makes them 2.5x as efficient, and they can answer everything in just one answer each. :-)"

MS Clarifies: No SP2 For Pirated XP Copies PingXao writes "Unlike earlier reports, this eWeek story says MS will not be allowing pirated versions of Windows XP to install SP2. They plan to release the update within a couple of months as everybody knows, but what's interesting is this quote from a MS spokesperson that supposedly explains their reasons for this approach: "... using genuine software is an important part of keeping systems secure and running smoothly because it means continued access to the latest security enhancements and product updates." Not that I blame them for not providing assistance to people who violate their copyrights, but I wonder if they actually paid someone to come up with that insightful explanation. Something like "We don't provide updates to pirates" would have done the trick. Why cloud the issue with talk about secure this and security that when the basis for the policy has absolutely nothing to do with security?"

Games panel at Smithsonian - update tripmaster writes "For those slashdotters that tried to get a ticket but were foiled by the smaller venue, the panel on games with Shigeru Miyamoto, Richard Garfield and Doug Church being held Sunday, May 16th at the Smithsonian in Washington DC has been moved to a bigger space. Miyamoto should be showing the same highlights of his latest game as premiered at E3. Questions from the audience will be collected and posed to the speakers -- a rare chance to ask query some of games' most visionary and influential creators."

Off again, on again. Doug Muth writes "According to this piece on Yahoo, the restraining order which was issued against SpamCop on May 10th has been dissolved by the judge who further remarked that, 'the TRO [entered May 10] was not a determination of the merits of the case.'"

This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Slashback: XPiracy, Panel, Gentoo

Comments Filter:
  • Very cool! (Score:5, Insightful)

    by erick99 (743982) * <homerun@gmail.com> on Wednesday May 12, 2004 @08:01PM (#9134233)
    Slashback needs to be more often if possible!

    Happy Trails!

    Erick

  • by securitas (411694) on Wednesday May 12, 2004 @08:06PM (#9134262) Homepage Journal


    As usual, it's never a good time to buy a computer.

    With prices constantly falling and better performance for price as hardware incessantly marches toward being a commodity good, one could just as easily say that it's always a good time to buy a computer.

    • by The_Mystic_For_Real (766020) on Wednesday May 12, 2004 @08:14PM (#9134317)
      With prices constantly falling and better performance for price as hardware incessantly marches toward being a commodity good, one could just as easily say that it's always a good time to buy a computer.

      I think the case is actually that tomorrow is always a better day to buy a computer. I have to say that I myself have procrastinated ad infinitum when upgrading systems because it always seems that something awesome is coming up in a few months.

      • I think the case is actually that tomorrow is always a better day to buy a computer.

        So today is a better day to buy a computer than yesterday, so today is a good time to buy a computer.
      • There's different types of awesome, however...

        For x86-64 systems, there's a major awesome just around the corner in the new CPU socket they're going to be releasing (which, among other things, will allow non-FX Athlon64s to use dual-channel memory).
    • Have you taken a look at the prices for ram lately? It's something like 4 times the cost of a month ago.
    • Today is a good day to buy yesterday's computer - unless you like getting gouged for bleeding edge components, of course.
    • by ColaMan (37550) on Thursday May 13, 2004 @06:07AM (#9137276) Homepage Journal
      Someone begs to differ:
      The Effects of Moore's Law and Slacking on Large Computations [gil-barad.net]

      Abstract :
      We show that, in the context of Moore's Law, overall productivity can be increased for large enough computations by `slacking' or waiting for some period of time before purchasing a computer and beginning the calculation.

      According to Moore's Law, the computational power available at a particular price doubles every 18 months. Therefore it is conceivable that for sufficiently large numerical calculations and fixed budgets, computing power will improve quickly enough that the calculation will finish faster if we wait until the available computing power is sufficiently better and start the calculation then.


      I particularly like their unit of measure : "slacktitude"
  • by FunWithHeadlines (644929) on Wednesday May 12, 2004 @08:06PM (#9134264) Homepage
    "using genuine software is an important part of keeping systems secure and running smoothly because it means continued access to the latest security enhancements and product updates."

    That's right, folks, only use "genuine" software for that clean, refreshing Microsoft feeling of comfort. The kind you cannot get with pirated software since they won't let you eliminate their own bugs that cause so many Net problems. The kind you cannot get with FOSS since you can see the code for yourself and fix the problems. No, if you want the genuine experience, the kind of out-of-the-box headache that only comes from Microsoft software, insist on "genuine" software! Our bank account balance will thank you.

    • by elid (672471) <eli.ipod@gm a i l.com> on Wednesday May 12, 2004 @08:17PM (#9134344)
      Where's the logic here? If you want to use Linux, use it. No one's forcing you to use a Microsoft OS. But don't pirate Microsoft software and expect to get updates. The only question up for discussion is whether not providing security updates for pirates will hurt people besides the pirates themselves.
      • "The only question up for discussion is whether not providing security updates for pirates will hurt people besides the pirates themselves."

        My precise point.

      • I don't use Windows, and as follows I don't pirate it. But I do expect updates for the pirates. Why? Because they screw up MY network, and Microsoft is to blame. I hate those bitches. Every last one of them.
      • ...The only question up for discussion is whether not providing security updates for pirates will hurt people besides the pirates themselves.

        I, for one, hope this does hurt the pirates. Why? Because anything that stops people from pirating software means they either have to pay for it or switch to something else (say GNU/Linux). Some will pay, but many will switch. I can't count how many times I've offered OpenOffice to people only to have them say they can get M$ Office for free (i.e. pirate it). Sto

      • The only question up for discussion is whether not providing security updates for pirates will hurt people besides the pirates themselves.

        There's not even a question there. It's a given in the whole thing. You think it's bad when people forget to patch and you have a Blaster epidemic, just imagine people that have to pirate a SECURITY patch. I don't kno about most people, but if I was on an ftp server (or whatever is used nowadays) and I saw something like Bryce 3D next to another package that said "Wi
    • by cyril3 (522783) on Wednesday May 12, 2004 @10:03PM (#9135131)
      since you can see the code for yourself and fix the problems

      Speaking as an average user can I just say that I don't wanna play with my kernel. I just wanna type my letters and go home. I don't wanna know what happens behind my desktop.

      It's a tool, like my car. I wouldn't have a clue how the engine management system in my car works. Hell, I don't even know if it has one apart from Joe down the garage. So I pay Joe or Microsoft to know that stuff. And it gets updated every now and then and with a little effort and a decent AV package I've never been hit by any worm or destructive virus.

      I use a fairly vanilla hardwear setup and when the ease of installation, and use of the OS and applications (and the range of applications) reaches the same level as Windows let me know. I and millions like me just don't have the training, time, or inclination to fiddle with the box.

      I appreciate that many do and it is those people who will eventually move Linux up to a position where it can replace Windows. But I object to being ridiculed as a mindless automaton because I don't share your passion for fixing operating systems. Because from a users perspective, it isn't as broken as you claim.

      Unless of course the 'you' referred to is the 0.0001% of the computer using population that does eliminate their own bugs or see code and fix it.

      • by FunWithHeadlines (644929) on Wednesday May 12, 2004 @10:52PM (#9135477) Homepage
        I wasn't ridiculing people such as yourself. You do not have to tinker with anything, if you don't want to. That's cool. Just write your letters and go home, that's fine.

        But to use your analogy of the car further, although you may not want to learn how the engine management system works, isn't it good to know that you could learn it if you wanted to? That you could open the hood at any time to check on the work the mechanic did? Wouldn't it be awful to be told you weren't allowed to look at your engine and had to trust the auto manufacturer any time they made an adjustment to your car?

        That's the freedom part of FOSS. Not that you have to look at the code, but at least you can look at it if you wanted to. You have the freedom to look or not look as you want.

    • >The kind [of bug] you cannot get with FOSS since you can see the code for yourself and fix the problems.

      I wish more people could, and I expect if open-source operating systems become the de-facto standard that more and more people WILL be able to read the code and fix problems (after all, this is the infancy of the computer revolution, isn't it?)

      But I also believe 99.999% of people using Linux today CAN'T fix kernel bugs.

      And the percentage will surely go even higher
      (99.999999) when Linux becomes main
  • by jm92956n (758515) on Wednesday May 12, 2004 @08:08PM (#9134274) Journal
    MS Clarifies: No SP2 For Pirated XP Copies

    So much for the herd effect. It's simply, really. If everyone but me has gotten a polio vaccine, I'll still be fine because the polio has nowhere to hide.As soon as 10 - 20 percent of the population isn't vaccinated, suddenly the problem [polio] reemerges.

    Why can't Microsoft understand the basic concept?
    • by IO ERROR (128968) <error@@@ioerror...us> on Wednesday May 12, 2004 @08:21PM (#9134372) Homepage Journal
      This essentially means that any Windows system which Microsoft thinks is "pirated" isn't going to get security updates. I can't wait for the rash of legitimate users who get caught up in this, trying to update their systems and Windows Update tells them their product key is not valid. (It happened to me on a legitimate licensed copy on trying to install SP1, and I still have no resolution at all on it.)
      • by LostCluster (625375) * on Wednesday May 12, 2004 @09:09PM (#9134736)
        TechTV had problems that most of their on-air computers (which they're sure they paid for Windows on) ended up on the banned-number list when SP1 came out. See, it's kinda hard to do computer how-to segments and not accidently let the license key slip over the air a few times by mistake...
      • by gclef (96311) on Wednesday May 12, 2004 @09:38PM (#9134966)
        Actually, I'm waiting for the next virus/worm to change your activation key to a pirated one. That'll be interesting to watch.
      • did you try calling Microsoft? Although in my experience their tech support is weak, I have been told they are very good about resolving license issues for "legitimate" users.

        Although I haven't tried it myself, since our numbers at work have always been good, and at home I wouldn't touch Windows with a 10-foot mouse.
        • by cmacb (547347) on Wednesday May 12, 2004 @10:38PM (#9135368) Homepage Journal
          I called them a couple years ago about a registration issue. I had installed the product more than three times (legitimately, because it had been removed from two of the older computers at this point). I got a third party company who said the computer that they needed to verify my authenticity was down. I was given some sort of fallback universal key (I don't know if it was time limited etc.)

          I asked what would happen if at some point in the future I needed to install the program again and was told I would have to call back each time. I asked if Microsoft had a commitment to always have someone there to answer the phone. She didn't know.

          That's when I decided to stop using MS products. It was the best event in my 10 years as a customer of the company. I immediately uninstalled the program (FrontPage of all things) and within 15 minutes had located an Open Source program that I actually liked better. The Web browser, word processor and operating system soon followed. It took a few months to adjust, but it was well worth it.

          I hope they keep up the good work. Make the product buggy, insecure, hard to use and too expensive. Maybe the US won't be so far behind the rest of the world when it comes to adopting open standards if MS cooperates by alienating their own customer base.
    • But the ones who aren't "vaccinated" are the only ones at risk. They're the same ones who are pirating Windows. Why should Microsoft be at all concerned about them?
    • jm92956n: MS Clarifies: No SP2 For Pirated XP Copies
      So much for the herd effect. It's simply, really. If everyone but me has gotten a polio vaccine, I'll still be fine because the polio has nowhere to hide.As soon as 10 - 20 percent of the population isn't vaccinated, suddenly the problem [polio] reemerges.
      Why can't Microsoft understand the basic concept?

      It could be because they answer to share holders and their chief goal (as a business) is to make money. If not releasing a service pack to pirates
    • As soon as 10 - 20 percent of the population isn't vaccinated, suddenly the problem [polio] reemerges. Why can't Microsoft understand the basic concept?

      Uh, 'cause they want 10 - 20 percent of the population to die of polio?

    • It wouldn't be that hard to make it work anyway, just extract the files from SP2 and replace the older ones in the system by overwriting them.
  • Read it Again... (Score:5, Insightful)

    by still_sick (585332) on Wednesday May 12, 2004 @08:09PM (#9134287)
    MS isn't saying they won't support Pirated versions - that implies that they're somehow changing their security scheme regarding service packs. They're NOT.

    The installation hurdles that existed in SP1 will be back again for SP2 - no more, no less.

    Nothing has changed, Move along, Move along...
    • Re:Read it Again... (Score:5, Interesting)

      by cubic6 (650758) <tom@NospAm.losthalo.org> on Wednesday May 12, 2004 @08:48PM (#9134590) Homepage
      "The installation hurdles that existed in SP1 will be back again for SP2 - no more, no less."

      Yes, and as with SP1, the day after SP2 comes out, there'll be 10 warez releases of WinXP with SP2 slipstreamed in for your downloading pleasure. They will also come complete with working CD keys and some handy tools to bypass activation if necessary. I agree, this isn't really news at all.
      • the day after SP2 comes out, there'll be 10 warez releases of WinXP with SP2 slipstreamed in for your downloading pleasure.

        Apparently, somebody didn't learn much from the story [slashdot.org] posted earlier today.

        Of course, anyone who downloads WinXP from an unofficial source deserves what they get.
        • I'm not really worried about those type of scares. what made it so interesting on the story you pointed out is that it was a mac were people don't expect virus infection. most mac owners ( i know) don't even have an antivirus. I would totally expect a virus or trojan and do other things to secure it.

          Of course that would be if i was the type of person to pirate microsofts ip. Actually i have a msdn license (thru ym work) and i can get them all free for testing as long as i can get access the first source co
  • Word (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Unnngh! (731758) on Wednesday May 12, 2004 @08:10PM (#9134288)
    From the blog,

    [re: star/open office]Their stated goal is to clone Office97, and they are so focused on that that there simply isn't anything to learn from or appreciate.

    While I understand his point, I don't see much innovation between office 2000/XP at all, at least not from an end-user perspective. It's become, to a large extent, bloatware. How much innovation does an office suite need, anyway? You get things like clippy when innovating a basically simply product to death. KISS.

    • It's not really so much innovation as it is slickness of UI. I currently use Office XP (but with no real plans to use 2003), and, yeah, it's more or less the same as Office 2000, only prettier. Office 97 looks clunky by today's standards; its successors are more or less functionally identical but look cleaner and more polished. On a slightly off-topic and rather contradictory note, they took a huge step backwards with Office 2003. It just looks ugly. I mean, that blue color scheme. And yes, I am aware
    • Re:Word (Score:3, Interesting)

      Agreed that Clippy is an annoyance. Also KISS is good, where the problem domain is S.

      What I really prefer about OpenOffice is the user interface. It seems cleaner and yet I can still get to everything. Navigator is a good way to move around a document, and shows you the structure's big picture. Floating toolbars can be docked on the sides where they expanded or contact with a click, like mozilla's sidebar or adobe acrobat, just plain rock. Saves serious screen realestate, and yet I can have what I ne
  • Slashback Reguarly (Score:5, Insightful)

    by beatleadam (102396) <flamberge&gmail,com> on Wednesday May 12, 2004 @08:11PM (#9134298) Homepage Journal
    If this feature were to have a regular day of posting (i.e. Every Wednesday at 5:00pm or somesuch time frame) it would go a long way in adding credibility to Slashdot as a source of news.

    No joking/flames intended but every news source makes mistakes and has to either back pedal or update or simply roll with an ever changing or expanding story or what would be now defunct "facts".
  • Blackmail (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Xhad (746307) on Wednesday May 12, 2004 @08:12PM (#9134301) Homepage Journal
    "Why cloud the issue with talk about secure this and security that when the basis for the policy has absolutely nothing to do with security?"

    I think what they're trying to get across is, "If your PC is insecure because you pirated our software, tough shit. Buy it next time and you can stay secure." I don't know that I like that attitude, since these unpatched machines as a whole also affect the people who do practice good security (usually through network traffic), but they're trying to equate "OS piracy" and "security risk", and just might succeed if new worms increase.

    • I don't know that I like that attitude, since these unpatched machines as a whole also affect the people who do practice good security (usually through network traffic), but they're trying to equate "OS piracy" and "security risk", and just might succeed if new worms

      What is interesting to me is, new worms or virus' could be released by microsoft itself to drive this point home.

      Noticed i said "could". I don't think Microsoft would do that but, I can't say I wouldn't put it past them. The question we need

  • wow (Score:5, Funny)

    by edrugtrader (442064) on Wednesday May 12, 2004 @08:12PM (#9134305) Homepage
    "... using genuine software is an important part of keeping systems secure and running smoothly because it means continued access to the latest security enhancements and product updates."

    double speak is awesome.

    Q: why can't pirates get updates.
    A: you shouldn't be a pirate because pirates don't get updates.
    Q: i know, i implied they didn't get updates in my question, and you just repeated it to me...
    A: you should know that... i just told you.
    Q: see, you did it again. why are you doing that?
    A: you would be better off if you knew why i was doing this.
    Q: REM this is a question.
    A: ...
    Q: IS THIS A MICROSOFT PR BOT?!
    A: abort; goto end; kill();

    • Re:wow (Score:5, Funny)

      by gstoddart (321705) on Wednesday May 12, 2004 @09:20PM (#9134810) Homepage
      Oh, man! Now they're gonna come out with the freakin' "install therapist" or something.

      "I see you've chosen to install the software o, D:, are you sure you wouldn't rather have it on C: where everyone else puts it?"

      "You haven't chosen to register now. Only bad people don't register now."

      "You don't call anymore, you just launch Mozilla and don't consider my feelings."

      Bastards!
    • Re:wow (Score:3, Funny)

      by moosesocks (264553)
      Yes. Only microsoft would combine the worst elements of C and BASIC to write a bot...

      (Explination -- in the parent post, his code is mostly BASIC, although the semicolon and kill function call are all C (or C++) syntax)
  • by Shapemaker (779051) <<mikko.tanner> <at> <gmail.com>> on Wednesday May 12, 2004 @08:12PM (#9134306)
    As a happy Gentoo user, I can testify to the usefulness of the system as a whole. Robbins and his crew really have done it right. It is the least the community can do to give something back to him for his hard work.

    We shall see how well the rest of the developers can knit the project together during the following months. It shall be interesting to see who will step forward as the new project leader as well.
    • by IO ERROR (128968) <error@@@ioerror...us> on Wednesday May 12, 2004 @08:34PM (#9134478) Homepage Journal
      $20,000 is a large chunk of change to be in debt. I personally use Gentoo and I'm going to have to go over and give him some money for putting together such a great system. I'd urge anybody who's happy with Gentoo to do the same.
      • by Anonymous Coward
        From listening to some of the developers talk, that $20,000 figure is not telling the whole truth. A lot of his debt was accumulated from poor life decisions (buying cars he couldn't afford, as an example) and questionable "bills" that he rang up on Gentoo's behalf. He also spent a lot of the Gentoo money that came in on silly things like airfare for friends to meet him at conferences.

        There has never been a public accounting of all the money that came in and all the money that went out. If there was, I
      • I've used Gentoo as my primary OS for years and never donated. I've just chipped in myself, despite not usually using my card over the net (the store is personally run by Daniel Robbins and so I trust it). After my donation I just feel like I've had the best value for money ever. All the pleasure and excitement Gentoo has given me, and the sheer amount of time saved and enhanced productivity through the power of emerge.

        Daniel not only put in so much work into coding, but also seemed to live in the IRC chat
    • I just went over and gave $20 and I am hoping to get a shirt when they get back in. Like the average ./ reader I cannot fit in a med.
  • Getting a release for AMD64 is a very good move for Mandrake. I just bought an AMD64 laptop, and I've looked around for linux distributions, but the discussion groups have mentioned problems with many of them. An Official Release by Mandrake is a good sign that the majority of the problems have been solved.

    Open Note to Mandrake: I'm running Mandrake right now on my office machine. If this version of Mandrake works well on my laptop, I intend to buy a box. Way to go!
  • by binarybum (468664)
    I'm afraid I do not agree with the policy of M$ to attempt to prevent pirates to get this update. I understand blocking piracy at the installation level , but since SP2 is touted to be a huge security update it seems that preventing it from installing on a certain population of systems will somewhat undermine the security of microsoft's global network (ie. the internet). Most of the powerful exploits are currently worms, and unpatched (sp2 disabled pirated copies)systems may serve as propogation nodes to
    • The real question is whether MS will continue to support pre-SP2 installations. Is there some compelling need for SP2? Otherwise, why not just stay with earlier versions and continue to get security updates.
    • Most of the powerful exploits are currently worms, and unpatched (sp2 disabled pirated copies)systems may serve as propogation nodes to either attack those legitimate(read wealthy)users that have not yet installed SP2 or to exploit windows issues that remain unfixed by SP2.

      I can see where your argument is coming from, but the likely situation will be that even legitimate installations will not all be patched either. MS doesn't have an obligation to the illegal installations. I imagine that if the probl
  • I just started an "emerge sync" and donated $5 (I'm a poor student). Gentoo is the bees knees as they say.
  • by Gldm (600518) on Wednesday May 12, 2004 @08:17PM (#9134343)
    I mean it must be comforting to know you can just blacklist the compromised install keys that pirates use and be done with it right? I mean it's not like anyone could possibly have made a key generator for Windows XP right?

    Is it just me or are anti-piracy measures just growing more and more inconvenient for legitimate users (product activation etc) and not at all more inconvenient for pirates (who get modified versions with the annoying features removed)?
  • All it'll take is 15 minutes and a smart cracker to allow you to install SP2 in all it's glory.

    Not to mention that almost all the XP users that have an illegal copy run a "corporate" version with a legit serial number anyways, so this won't even affect them.

    Of course, then there's the users that actually won't be able to install it, and we'll all pay for it with clogged up networks due to all the bugs and crap still in there.
  • Microsoft are saying that they wont provide the latest service packs for their software for pirates. Doesn't most of the world pirate MS Windows? Do you think people pay for it if they had to? What do you think would happen to the market share of Windows if Microsoft make it tougher to pirate their OS? Do you think developers will be so keen to support an operating system with a declining user base?

    All this could be a blessing in disguise for Linux/MacOS as people may be forced to look for an Alternative
  • by Cranx (456394)
    But, I thought open source products are far more profitable than closed-source projects in the long run. Maybe he quit too soon.
  • and saw this message:

    Your order has been successfully processed! Your products will arrive at their destination within 2-5 working days.

    I wonder which products they're talking about
  • Otherwise they'd be saying that they don't care about persuing people who pirate their software. On the other hand, it'll take a day or two just like SP1 for people to get around it. To install SP1 on a machine with a blacklisted cd-key takes about 5 minutes of googling, downloading, reading, and cracking. Outside the corporate world, it seems it's impossible to get caught using pirated software. This whole genuine software bit was just the work of some PR person who's knowledge in software doesn't matt
    • And by the way, this isn't going to make anyone switch to linux, i don't care what people say or annoyingly ironic links to gentoo.com they put in their posts. When you don't pay for software in the first place, it doesn't make a difference to switch to free software.

      It might not make a difference to you, but to some people it does make a difference. You see, there are these things called "ethics", and these other things called "morals", and they are tied together by this thing called "conscience". Maybe y

  • Bitkeeper (Score:3, Interesting)

    by AeiwiMaster (20560) on Wednesday May 12, 2004 @08:41PM (#9134533)
    Could someone which is using bitkeeper
    update this comparison [gnuarch.org] with the bitkeeper data.

  • by xxx_Birdman_xxx (676056) on Wednesday May 12, 2004 @08:54PM (#9134644)
    Unfortunally most people I know who aren't interesting in computers (I'm mainly thinking family members here), just want to turn on their computers, do some typing, send an email and surf the web.
    The are simply not interested in updating their OS. Most of them don't understand what updating is for. They only time they worry about it is when I get a phonecall going:
    "Ryan, the computer keeps shutting down for no reason.. what should I do?" - then i go in for cleanup, patches, firewall, firefox, etc, etc...

    So what happens is that you can end up with lots of legal AND illegal versions of software that aren't patched. I think many people wouldn't even know if they have a legal version or not.. They just use what is given to them.
    This is why worms lately have been able to cause so much havic lately. People just don't understand they have to update.

    So stopping the service packs from being installed just increases this issue and we have more and more machines on the net that are a breeding ground for worms- its hard to get people to update as it is!
    People see all these computers around with problems with Windows and form a bad opinion of it. Isn't it better to try to aim to have ALL copies of Windows installed around the world up to date and working smoothly, than risk getting the reputation that it's a bug-riddled OS?
  • by Dwonis (52652) * on Wednesday May 12, 2004 @08:59PM (#9134682)
    Why cloud the issue with talk about secure this and security that when the basis for the policy has absolutely nothing to do with security?"

    Well, if you can't dazzle them with brilliance...

  • I am supposed to keep Windows updated. AND have an antivirus program?
  • Every one seems to think that SP2 will really, truely make Windows more secure. With Microsofts track record, I'm not so sure. I'm willing to bet that it's going to open all sorts of new problems, and Windows it going to continue to be the mess of an OS that it always has been.
  • by leshert (40509) on Wednesday May 12, 2004 @09:35PM (#9134936) Homepage
    Not that I blame them for not providing assistance to people who violate their copyrights, but I wonder if they actually paid someone to come up with that insightful explanation.

    Yes. They're called PR people. And they all sound like that. :-)

    The funny thing is, the ones I've know talk like that all the time. It's a little uncanny--having lunch with one feels like reading about your day in PC Week.
  • Consider this... (Score:2, Insightful)

    by geekanarchy (769840)
    So assume, M$ doesn't release SP2 to the illegal WinXP users. Now as all the new (and existing) worms start their squirm of terror over the net, who should we blame? The worm coders, of course; but how responsible is it that a certain company knows that worms will quickly propogate through their widely pirated software and refuse to make available a patch? So the whole internet must pay the price becuase Microsoft wants to get back at the teenagers who won't dish out the $300 for their buggy OS. Yeah, that
  • by evilviper (135110) on Wednesday May 12, 2004 @10:28PM (#9135295) Journal
    For all you Windows users out there, I have a solution... DON'T UPGRADE!

    If you need to use Windows, at least be smart and don't get XP. MS insists on making you jump through extra hoops, so why not stick with good old 2000? It can do anything XP can, without registration, without the nasty new interface, and faster of course. Now that XP is the current Windows version, you can find perfectly legal copies of 2000 really cheap.

    Personally, I never upgraded from NT4. It's more stable than any other version (I would know), insanely fast compared to any other version, hardware drivers are always available, and it's still got rather modern Windows features (like DirectX 6). Runs all the same Windows programs as XP/2000.

    Now for some interesting prices:
    WinNT 4.0 Full $21.00 [trustprice.com] <-- recomended version
    Win 2000 $88.00 [trustprice.com]
    Win 95 OSR2 w/USB Full $17.00 [trustprice.com]
    Win 98 $49.00 [trustprice.com]
  • by SuperKendall (25149) * on Thursday May 13, 2004 @12:15AM (#9135928)
    This may be a little extreme even for Slashdot, but it seems like Microsoft almost has an obligation to support SP2 for everyone, including pirated copies. Otherwise legions of infested computers will linger all over, leading to future headaches for all...

    It's almost like they sold teddy bears to children with vials of some terrible virus embedded inside and are refusing to give the antidote to people without a receipt for the bear.

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