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Gifted Children Find Heavy Metal Comforting 585

Posted by samzenpus
from the the-soothing-side-of-slayer dept.
An anonymous reader writes "The Daily Telegraph is reporting that intelligent teenagers often listen to heavy metal music to cope with the pressures associated with being talented, according to research. Researchers found that, far from being a sign of delinquency and poor academic ability, many adolescent "metalheads" are extremely bright and often use the music to help them deal with the stresses and strains of being gifted social outsiders."
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Gifted Children Find Heavy Metal Comforting

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  • Punk (Score:5, Interesting)

    by BWJones (18351) * on Wednesday March 21, 2007 @08:48PM (#18437365) Homepage Journal
    Part of me wants to respond in an incredibly cynical manner to this as most "intelligent teenagers" are smart enough to be aware of much of the bullshit associated with growing up and being aware of wider sociopolitical, environmental and other issues and they need a release for the anger. Other cynical parts of me want to say they are also smart enough to be able to recognize the top 40 drivel that is being disseminated by the recording industry.

    However, stepping back from the cynicism, I would note that this was always my experience with the punk scene. Specifically, most people I knew in the scene were incredibly talented, highly intelligent and for the most part more articulate than average. I always wondered how it was that we seemed to find one another, self assemble and take part in a scene that was a retreat of sorts from lives and upbringings that were in most cases not "Leave it to Beaver" or "The Cosby Show" type lives.

    • Re:Punk (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Frosty Piss (770223) on Wednesday March 21, 2007 @08:51PM (#18437397)

      Other cynical parts of me want to say they are also smart enough to be able to recognize the top 40 drivel that is being disseminated by the recording industry.

      Really? Isn't most head bangin' heavy metal disseminated by the recording industry?

      • Re:Punk (Score:4, Informative)

        by BWJones (18351) * on Wednesday March 21, 2007 @08:58PM (#18437481) Homepage Journal
        Really? Isn't most head bangin' heavy metal disseminated by the recording industry?

        Perhaps you are revealing just how aware you are.... ;-)

        Seriously though, there is *lots* of very good music out there including metal and punk that does not come through the big RIAA dominated scene. If you will note, that is why I invoked punk.

        • Re:Punk (Score:4, Informative)

          by Terminal Saint (668751) on Wednesday March 21, 2007 @10:31PM (#18438397)
          Strictly speaking, punk ONLY comes from non-RIAA sources. As soon as you sell out you're not playing punk anymore, just a sad mockery of it.
          • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

            by confusednoise (596236)
            Strictly speaking then, we don't count the following bands as being punk:

            The Ramones
            The Clash
            Sex Pistols
            The Stooges

            All released on major labels (therefore RIAA)....lots and lots more, but I'm lazy. The whole "sell out" label that holier than thou types throw around with abandon really annoys the piss out of me.
      • Re:Punk (Score:4, Interesting)

        by pinkstuff (758732) on Wednesday March 21, 2007 @10:55PM (#18438585)

        No.

        It depends on your definition tho, the recording industry puts a lot of music out that they call Heavy Metal. It is quite easy for the avid Heavy Metal listener to filter out that crud.

        In other words, what they call Heavy Metal just ain't Heavy Metal :). Just look at Strapping Young Lad [centurymedia.com], those ugly old bastards are a PR/records label nightmare!

      • Re:Punk (Score:5, Informative)

        by alienuforia (1009777) on Wednesday March 21, 2007 @11:57PM (#18439097)
        Really? Isn't most head bangin' heavy metal disseminated by the recording industry?

        Nope. Actually, there's a truckload of metal out there that is completely dissociated from the current Top 40 music scene. In many ways, the realm of Top 40 radio hits has been on a dying path for some years. It still persists because it was a convenient way to find good music before the dawn of the digital age, and there will always be those among the masses too lazy to find what suits them best. Top 40 music is consistently available for those people looking for catchy tunes, but I believe you will find a much richer world of music if you look deeper into the lists of independent artists and bands out there. That feeling of discovering a new group with fresh sounds is unsurpassed by the record industry's efforts to pump out "Top Hits" every month.

        If you think a record label and great music are exclusively hand-in-hand, then you are short-changing yourself in the world of music that exists today. You can find just about any genre that will blow your ears away from the lyrical depth, passion, and creative quality not found in the work of artists signed by the RIAA. Independent labels are unbound by the chains of corporate earnings and contract clauses that each record label artist must sign upon entering the business. That kind of unbridled freedom to make music is exciting in the mind of this audiophile. That's not to say that the RIAA doesn't have some great bands signed up, but the worldwide music scene has grown larger than the industry itself. You no longer need them to bring you good music when it's already sitting out there.
      • by Sloppy (14984)

        Isn't most head bangin' heavy metal disseminated by the recording industry?

        If by "most," you mean "nearly none," then yeah. Sheesh, go to a metal show sometime. After the show, when you're buying a shirt and CD so that the band has enough gas money to get to the next town, look at the "label" on the CD. It's almost always just some guy working out of his house, and he sure as hell ain't an RIAA member. Call it a recording "industry" if you want, but you just made that word mean nothing.

    • RTFA, baby. (Score:5, Informative)

      by khasim (1285) <brandioch.conner@gmail.com> on Wednesday March 21, 2007 @08:59PM (#18437493)

      Asked for their favourite type of music, 39 per cent said rock, 18 per cent R&B and 14 per cent pop. Six per cent said heavy metal and a third rated it in their top five genres.

        6% - Heavy Metal
      14% - Pop

      More of them listed the Britney Spears genre than the Angus Young genre.

      I'd say there might be some flaws in this "study". :)
    • Re:Punk (Score:4, Insightful)

      by Turn-X Alphonse (789240) on Wednesday March 21, 2007 @09:23PM (#18437757) Journal
      A lot of punks are very intelligent people (in a very warped way geeks are punks in many ways, we tend to over lap and have a usually left wing mentality), but you have to remember punk as we it should be is rather dead. Punk got too mainstream to the point where it became pop music and all it stood for became "lets do drugs and break stuff!" in the current climate. These "neo punks" are little more than teeny boppers dressed up as something else, still looking for something to call their own and a scene where "no one cares what you are (cough how it used to be cough)" is the obvious place to settle.

      As for heavy metal being related to gifted children.. Hmm no. Because music is a personal thing and people will tend to enjoy what they are exposed to at a young age and leaves a lasting impression. So right now rap, girl bands, heavy metal (the pointless screaming type) and punk would be popular with children (0-12ish) in most cases. Where as back in my day (born 86) we had more dance music and retro stuff from the 70s and 80s still hanging around. Which would be very similar to my taste in music now.

      Plus children are fickle, if we gave them the entire catalog of music they would have a new favourite band/style every other day.
      • Re:Punk (Score:5, Insightful)

        by Original Replica (908688) on Wednesday March 21, 2007 @10:03PM (#18438107) Journal
        Heavy metal and punk both have two characteristics that could easily appeal to gifted kids. There is a rejection of the mainstream average(you-don't-understand-me) and an inclusion in a brotherhood of "different-but-better". This misunderstood elite is obviously going to appeal to kids that are bored in class and frequently ostricized because of thier intelligence. Why do you think "news for nerds" is a source of pride for /.ers ?
        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by suv4x4 (956391)
          Why do you think "news for nerds" is a source of pride for /.ers ?

          Actually I'm ashamed I go back here and read Slashdot, but I'm addicted to posting comments clarifying the BS posing as articles. It's a trap. For reals.
      • Re:Punk (Score:5, Insightful)

        by anaesthetica (596507) on Wednesday March 21, 2007 @10:30PM (#18438381) Homepage Journal

        in a very warped way geeks are punks in many ways, we tend to over lap and have a usually left wing mentality

        I think this may reflect you reading your own political position into punk/geek culture more than anything else. Geeks and Punks share a kind of anti-authoritarianism that doesn't map well into the (mostly bullshit) left-right political spectrum. Geek libertarianism and Punk DIY-anarchism fit parts of the left and parts of the right. Matching the left, they care about solidarity, anti-corporatism, and socio-cultural liberty. Matching the right, they care about negative freedoms (small, limited government as opposed to the nanny state) and "rugged individualism."

        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by jejones (115979)
          In a bizarre way, that common description of libertarianism is sort of like accepting "grue" and "bleen" [wikipedia.org] as fundamental terms. Wouldn't it be better to describe the right and left as supporting liberty to varying extents and in different areas?
      • Re:Punk (Score:4, Funny)

        by laszlo462 (946606) on Thursday March 22, 2007 @12:09AM (#18439185)

        Where as back in my day (born 86)
        What the hell are you talking about? Back in "your day" was like 4 years ago.
    • Re:Punk (Score:5, Insightful)

      by AcidArrow (912947) on Wednesday March 21, 2007 @10:07PM (#18438155)
      Meh.

      Linking music tastes and intelligence is really, really, wrong. What kind of music you like depends on so many factors, mostly environmental but... anyway.

      Let's take a look at the article:

      Mr Cadwallader then held an online discussion involving 19 members of the academy, 17 of whom were heavy metal fans.
      Translation: Some psychologist asked some kids what kind of music they liked and they answered heavy metal. Oh and they also weren't complete idiots.
      Since the sample was so big (almost 20 people!), obviously all "gifted" (definition?) children must listen to heavy metal. But since most of heavy metal is crap, he couldn't help but wonder why did these kids listen to this kind of crap.

      One student said: "It helps me with stress. It's the general thrashiness of it. You can't really jump your anger into the floor and listen to your music at the same time with other types of music."
      Ah! That makes sense, because smart people worry about society and stuff. The psychologist thought that his findings were so great he had to share them with the rest of the world, but he needed some statistics, so on his way home he asked some more kids about what kind of music they liked so he can make useless statistics that help make a research look all that much more professional:

      The researchers surveyed 1,057 members of the National Academy for Gifted and Talented Youth - a body whose 120,000 student members are within the top five per cent academically in the 11-19 age range. Asked for their favourite type of music, 39 per cent said rock, 18 per cent R&B and 14 per cent pop. Six per cent said heavy metal and a third rated it in their top five genres.
      Okay so he found that from a group of supposedly smart kids (although I'm not sure that academia equals intelligence), SIX percent really likes bands like tool, slipknot and system of a down (which are very popular bands anyway) and about one third said "tool? they're cool, I used to listen to aenima a lot". Did that miniscule percentage surprise him that much that he had to go and tell the world?
  • by DeadSea (69598) * on Wednesday March 21, 2007 @08:49PM (#18437375) Homepage Journal
    If you are having trouble being gifted, try eating heavy metals rather than listening to heavy metal. That way you won't be gifted very long.
    • by cuantar (897695)
      That's actually what I thought the article was about after reading the headline: gifted teenagers experiencing life-changing epiphanies after eating lead paint.
  • by grub (11606) <slashdot@grub.net> on Wednesday March 21, 2007 @08:50PM (#18437381) Homepage Journal

    Let's see... I'm 41, have loved metal since I was 14 (Motorhead is the greatest band EVAR) and am the smartest guy on slashdot...
    The evidence is overwhelming.

    • by BWJones (18351) *
      Ha ha ha grub,

      Very funny. Seriously though, you should know that there is *always* someone smarter than you out there. The trick I've found is to find as many of them as you can and surround yourself with them so they continue to challenge you, introduce you to new thinking etc...etc...etc...

    • by Jesterboy (106813)
      IRON MAIDEN?!

      Excellent idea, old bean!
    • Re:It's so true. (Score:4, Interesting)

      by Dachannien (617929) on Wednesday March 21, 2007 @09:27PM (#18437801)
      You forgot the heavy metal umlaut! [wikipedia.org]
  • Heavy Metal (Score:5, Funny)

    by user24 (854467) on Wednesday March 21, 2007 @08:52PM (#18437403) Homepage
    Yeah, I love listening to mercury
  • Yep. (Score:5, Insightful)

    by MostAwesomeDude (980382) on Wednesday March 21, 2007 @08:54PM (#18437423) Homepage
    It's entirely true. I first dug into Metallica and Black Sabbath when I was about 13, and I find myself hooked on Dream Theater, Shadow Gallery, and Symphony X now.

    Hard rock, progressive rock, and heavy metal all usually talk about social and political issues in a manner that is both musical and lyrical, and it's a lot easier to dig into and associate with than the lamenting dorks that populate alternative and indie rock nowadays.
    • by rob1980 (941751)
      Dream Theater owns my face. And you're exactly right about social issues, how about Kick the Chair by Megadeth, or The Great Debate by DT? Better than some hip gangsta rollin on dubs.
      • Re:Yep. (Score:4, Informative)

        by psykocrime (61037) <mindcrime@cpp[ ]ker.co.uk ['hac' in gap]> on Wednesday March 21, 2007 @11:00PM (#18438625) Homepage Journal
        Dream Theater owns my face. And you're exactly right about social issues, how about Kick the Chair by Megadeth, or The Great Debate by DT? Better than some hip gangsta rollin on dubs.

        Yep. And how about S.D.I. by Bonfire, Fight for Your Rights by Motley Crue, Symphony of Destruction by Megadeth, When Freedom Dies by Nuclear Assault, The Needle Lies by Queensryche, Lack of Communication by Ratt, Institutionalized by Suicidal Tendencies, etc., etc. Lots of metal bands have written songs that were raised awareness and created discussion about important social issues. The myth that metal is all nihilistic "suicide music" is so much bullshit...
  • by condour75 (452029) on Wednesday March 21, 2007 @08:55PM (#18437437) Homepage
    Look for the ones with AC/DC and Metallica shirts. Also look for signs of Aspberger's syndrome in their interaction with hippie teachers, redneck neighbors, Daria...
  • Also.. (Score:2, Insightful)

    by Doddman (953998)
    Consider that some heavy metal is very intellegent music. Sure, when most people hear "heavy metal" they think Slipknot, Korn, Marilyn Manson and the ilk, but I can get into some Iron Maiden (The Rime of the Ancient Mariner is singularly the greatest metal song ever, and not only for it's music), Metallica (80's era) has some great political meaning, and Tool is fun to listen to and try to contemplate the possible meanings of the song. Or am I the only gifted nerd who thinks so?
    • Marilyn Manson (Score:5, Insightful)

      by ScaryMonkey (886119) on Wednesday March 21, 2007 @09:30PM (#18437819)
      As a side note, I've seen a couple interviews with Marilyn Manson and he comes across as surprisingly intelligent and well-spoken, even while still wearing the freaky makeup.
      • Re:Marilyn Manson (Score:5, Interesting)

        by jamrock (863246) on Thursday March 22, 2007 @12:33AM (#18439343)

        "As a side note, I've seen a couple interviews with Marilyn Manson and he comes across as surprisingly intelligent and well-spoken, even while still wearing the freaky makeup."

        Florence Henderson (the mother in The Brady Bunch) said almost the exact same thing after meeting Marilyn Manson on Bill Maher's former show, Politically Incorrect. She was doing an interview and was asked how she felt about the incongruity of the two of them participating in a round table discussion, and she replied that she thoroughly enjoyed talking with him. She said that she was struck by how intelligent and articulate he was, and that she found him to be extremely charming.

    • Re:Also.. (Score:5, Informative)

      by dc29A (636871) on Wednesday March 21, 2007 @10:10PM (#18438201)
      Consider that some heavy metal is very intellegent music. Sure, when most people hear "heavy metal" they think Slipknot, Korn, Marilyn Manson and the ilk, but I can get into some Iron Maiden (The Rime of the Ancient Mariner is singularly the greatest metal song ever, and not only for it's music), Metallica (80's era) has some great political meaning, and Tool is fun to listen to and try to contemplate the possible meanings of the song. Or am I the only gifted nerd who thinks so?

      The beauty of metal, especially after it's "death" in the early 90s is that it's been reborn and many new sub genres are born. Everything from Symphonic Metal to Melodic Death to Progressive to Doom to Gothic to whatever!

      Some lesser known but very talented bands:

      Therion [wikipedia.org] - Sopranos, tenors, baritones, lot of classical instruments. Pure genius. Theli, Vovin, Secret of the Runes are great albums. Their live shows are also very interesting, they usually travel with about 5-6 opera singers.

      The Gathering [wikipedia.org] - One of the first gothic metal bands (now more gothic/atmospheric rock). Mandylion, if_then_else, How to measure a planet, are all very good. Due to some experimental guitar work, their style has been labeled sometimes "shoe gazing".

      Tiamat [wikipedia.org] - Pink Floyd meets Gothic Metal. Wildhoney is among the best gothic metal albums. Awesome albums are also Prey and A deeper kind of slumber. Another band that evolved from extreme metal to some weird psychedelic gothic style.

      Agalloch [wikipedia.org] - Atmospheric, lot of doom/dark ambiance. Every record from this band is worth it's weight in gold. I do have a soft spot for Ashes against the grain.

      Nightwish [wikipedia.org] - One of the bands who defines the Symphonic Metal sub genre. Lot of uplifting melodies, great shows. Once, Century Child and Oceanborn are really good.

      Katatonia [wikipedia.org] - Everything from doom metal to gothic rock. They started as some extreme metal band and evolved into some weird dark/doom rock/metal mix. Viva Emptiness and The Great Cold Distance are great.

      Symphony X [wikipedia.org] - Progressive Metal at it's best. Jazz and classical influences. Albums like The Diving Wings of Tragedy and V are their best.

      Iced Earth [wikipedia.org] - How Metallica should have evolved. The Gettysburg 1863 trilogy is a pure masterpiece of symphonic metal. The rest of their work is more classical thrash with Iron Maidenesque melodies and gallops. Something Wicked and Dark Saga are very strong albums.

      Opeth [wikipedia.org] - Progressive Death Metal, extreme on some albums and some dark haunting lullabies on some others. Orchid, Damnation and Deliverance are my favorites.

      Ayreon [wikipedia.org] - One composer, Arjen Lucassen, almost every album is a concept album. Invites various singers to sing for him. Style is mostly progressive rock/metal.

      Tristania [wikipedia.org] - Probably the most beautiful female voice in the metal world (hopefully the future Nightwish singer). Ashes and World of Glass are amazing gothic metal albums.
  • Really? (Score:2, Funny)

    by mushadv (909107)

    I thought'd it be math rock. [wikipedia.org]

    Sorry, sorry, sorry. I'll leave through the side door.

  • by Swift Kick (240510) on Wednesday March 21, 2007 @08:57PM (#18437465)
    From the article:

    The researchers surveyed 1,057 members of the National Academy for Gifted and Talented Youth - a body whose 120,000 student members are within the top five per cent academically in the 11-19 age range.

    Asked for their favourite type of music, 39 per cent said rock, 18 per cent R&B and 14 per cent pop. Six per cent said heavy metal and a third rated it in their top five genres.

    So no, not 'many adolescent metalheads', but a few happen to be gifted, compared to the rest who listen to other types of music.

    Also from the article:

    The heavy metal fans in the study had lower self-esteem and more difficulties in family relationships and friendships.

    So, if anything, one could hypothesize that gifted teenages that listen to heavy metal are more likely to have shitty self-esteem and quite possibly being perceived as asshats by family and friends, and listened to heavy metal as a way to 'cope' with the anger.

    Just you wait until they start playing those tracks backwards....
  • I was the same way in the 90's. I found the wave of impressive metal tunes rather impressive, almost nourishing. The emotional content was almost meaningless - but the intricacy and drive behind the chords made up for the annoyance with the manipulative and occasionally insipid emotional content of the songs.

    It's hard to find music that holds a lot of interesting 'content' per second of sound. Perhaps in a signal-to-noise ratio, where crooning voices or cheap noise effects, metal just held the greatest s
  • From TFA (emphasis mine):

    The researchers surveyed 1,057 members of the National Academy for Gifted and Talented Youth - a body whose 120,000 student members are within the top five per cent academically in the 11-19 age range.

    Asked for their favourite type of music, 39 per cent said rock, 18 per cent R&B and 14 per cent pop. Six per cent said heavy metal and a third rated it in their top five genres.

    The heavy metal fans in the study had lower self-esteem and more difficulties in family relationship

    • "Alternately, if your kids likes rock, they are 6.6 times more likely to be a genius"

      I'm sure you have no difficulty figuring out how this statement is wrong.
  • Damn kids (Score:5, Funny)

    by localroger (258128) on Wednesday March 21, 2007 @09:08PM (#18437589) Homepage
    In my day, we made do Elton John and DEVO. And we LIKED it.
  • by fred fleenblat (463628) on Wednesday March 21, 2007 @09:09PM (#18437603) Homepage
    I suppose some of it might be that gifted children could have a degree of asperger's syndrome and aren't as able to relate to the oh-baby-baby emotive style of typical pop music.
    • by 644bd346996 (1012333) on Wednesday March 21, 2007 @10:04PM (#18438115)
      I think it is more that gifted children deal with a very different set of emotional challenges. For example, not many pop artists sing about the excruciating boredom of being stuck in a middle school when you are academically ready for college. Nor do you hear much about the angst of being eight years younger than the dumbest people you would consider peers. Also, gifted kids are usually far less interested in the dating scene during the teenage years. All of the really gifted kids I know have developed really weird or dangerous hobbies to cope with the relative monotony of suburban American life.

      When you are dealing with profoundly gifted kids, it is a safe bet that any antisocial behavior is mostly intentional and the kid is fully aware of how other people interpret those actions. I've known at least one kid who could fool most any psychologist into thinking he had Asperger's, at first glance.
  • by MisterCookie (991581) on Wednesday March 21, 2007 @09:10PM (#18437609)
    Maybe they just like the music? I'm a member of the International Baccalaureate program and few of my peers have similar tastes in music. I waste my life listening to video game soundtracks, a few other members like classical, one likes techno. And for every smart kid who listens to heavy metal, there's fifty moronic ones that do the same. Only six percent of intelligent students like it and they act like its a massive majority.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Bralkein (685733)
      Right. I'm pretty sure preference in music is just a matter of taste (or lack thereof). People have been telling me that I'm clever for as long as I can remember, and I think metal is at best silly and at worst pathetic. My favourite band is Sonic Youth. However, at school I used to hang out with a bunch of other very intelligent people who were similarly ostracised for being good in class. Our group of friends spanned a wide range of musical tastes including classical, hip-hop/r&b, experimental, classi
  • by MrSteveSD (801820) on Wednesday March 21, 2007 @09:10PM (#18437615)
    If you show keenness or interest in a subject at school, you are already likely to be treated as an outsider. You don't have to be a genius to be an outcast. I think the pressure to conform to the "hive mind" at school is the thing that really holds children back.
  • ...I just really, really dig dragons.
  • Pantera! (Score:3, Informative)

    by Saint Stephen (19450) on Wednesday March 21, 2007 @09:15PM (#18437663) Homepage Journal
    Go youtube Pantera - Walk. Now.

    Or maybe watch Lemmy sing Ace of Spades on the Young Ones. Loser!
  • by imAck (102644) on Wednesday March 21, 2007 @09:20PM (#18437721) Homepage
    You've not experienced The Rhyme of the Ancient Mariner until you've read it in the original Iron Maiden.
  • by suv4x4 (956391) on Wednesday March 21, 2007 @09:22PM (#18437747)
    This article basically makes no sense.

    Gifted children: is there a single type of gifted children? Gifted in what? You can be very gifted in certain areas and suck in other areas.

    Also, it's funny that the fellow Slashdot commenters which listen to heavy metal read this as "you listen to heavy metal, so this confirms you're gifted". I don't blame anyone for putting on his rose glasses though. It's only natural.

    For the record, gifted children are not a monoculture. There are some gifted children who listen to heavy metal to deal with stress of being a teenager. Nice. There are also gifted children who don't listen to heavy metal, and heavy metal listeners that aren't gifted.

    You're walking away from this article slightly less mentally gifted. Slashdot, you suck.
    • There are also gifted children who don't listen to heavy metal, and heavy metal listeners that aren't gifted.

      Agreed. Without access to the full study, this writeup doesn't really mean anything.

      TFA: Asked for their favourite type of music, 39 per cent said rock, 18 per cent R&B and 14 per cent pop. Six per cent said heavy metal and a third rated it in their top five genres.

      From the sounds of this, articles could easily have been written stating that "Gifted Children Find R&B Comforting" or "G
  • by edunbar93 (141167) on Wednesday March 21, 2007 @09:30PM (#18437821)
    I know for absolute certain that the kids in *my* highschool that listened to heavy metal were most certainly not the best and the brightest. But that was back when bands like Metallica and Megadeth were at the top of the music charts, and Jerry Falwell and Tipper Gore were trying to make a political career out of the genre.

    I think that this article is more like "nerdy kids listen to music that isn't cool."
  • Academic ability? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Jartan (219704) on Wednesday March 21, 2007 @10:12PM (#18438223)
    Did anyone else roll their eyes at academic ability? I admit Britain might be different but I can't say as I've ever seen anything that convinces me academic ability makes someone smart or that lack of it makes them dumb. In fact I've always considered excessive willingness to engage in a system that amounts to government funded daycare as a sign that the other person might lack intelligence.
  • *favourite genre* (Score:4, Interesting)

    by Average (648) on Wednesday March 21, 2007 @10:59PM (#18438619)
    God, I'd be buggered to name a *favourite genre*. I'm curious if they got a list to pick from. I know I've had that problem when asked similar questions. Probably easier to say "none of these" than try to get into:

    Singer-songrwriter Folk
    Bluegrass esp. New Acoustic/Newgrass
    Celtic (stronger toward Scottish or Newfoundland)
    Blues, Polka, Jazz, Klezmer, old Country, slightly harder New Age (Jean Luc Ponty or Ralph Towner), Scandinavian (NorthSide records artists), Jam Bands, etc etc.

    You know, the stuff that is categorized as "Other" and not even counted in such surveys. Mostly I'm sad that the "gifted" kids have such limited horizons that 80% answered "eh... rock, I guess".
  • by mapkinase (958129) on Thursday March 22, 2007 @08:53AM (#18441705) Homepage Journal

    The researchers surveyed 1,057 members of the National Academy for Gifted and Talented Youth - a body whose 120,000 student members are within the top five per cent academically in the 11-19 age range.

    Asked for their favourite type of music, 39 per cent said rock, 18 per cent R&B and 14 per cent pop. Six per cent said heavy metal and a third rated it in their top five genres.
    I guess one needs to compare this statistics to a result of the refrence group. Below is the excerpt from the poll results [usaweekend.com] done by "USA WEEKEND Magazine's Teens & Music survey, published last fall. Nearly 60,000 teens responded to our poll in the magazine, at our Web site and through this year's partner, MuchMusic USA".

    If you had to choose just one type of music to listen to exclusively, which would it be?

    Hip-hop/rap 27%
    Pop 23%
    Rock/punk 17%
    Alternative 7%
    Christian/gospel 6%
    R&B 6%
    Country 5%
    Techno/house 4%
    Jazz 1%
    Other 4%
    So make your own judgement.

    About the author of the paper [nagty.ac.uk]:

    Stuart Cadwallader BSc (First Class Honours) Psychology, University of Kent. I am currently studying for an MA in Educational Research methods.
    Webpage is updated at least this year. So the author of the survey called "psychologist at the University of Warwick" in the Telegraph article does not have a master degree yet. Hmm...

"In matters of principle, stand like a rock; in matters of taste, swim with the current." -- Thomas Jefferson

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