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Education Technology

Some Mexican Classrooms Adopt Hi-Tech Teaching 150

Posted by Zonk
from the creepy-but-cool dept.
An anonymous reader writes "It what is believed to be the most ambitious project of its kind in the world. In a program called Enciclomedia, giant electronic screens have been attached to the walls of about 165,000 Mexican classrooms. Some five million 10 & 11 year-olds now receive all their education through these screens. 'From maths to music, from geography to geometry, black and white boards have given way to electronic screens. During a biology lesson we watch as pupil after pupil comes to the screen to piece together the human body... electronically. One boy taps his finger on the screen and brings up the human heart. He then slides his finger across the screen, taking the heart with him and places it where he thinks it belongs on the body located on the other side of the screen.'"
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Some Mexican Classrooms Adopt Hi-Tech Teaching

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  • by ciaohound (118419) on Friday March 30, 2007 @01:44PM (#18547119)
    "One boy taps his finger on the screen and brings up the human heart."

    This wasn't part of an Aztec ritual, was it?
  • by Mazin07 (999269) on Friday March 30, 2007 @01:45PM (#18547135) Homepage
    This is great! Now teachers can do even less work while the magic screen on the wall teaches the kids!

    I had Bill Nye the Science Guy as a science teacher once. There was also some other guy there, but I think his job was to manage the VCR.
  • by danpsmith (922127) on Friday March 30, 2007 @02:08PM (#18547549)

    Is why in some variants of English is math pluralized to maths? It seems not to be the case with most other things, for example they didn't say "musics". Where I grew up (southwest USA) it was always math, singular, which makes sense to be. Though there are different facets, it is all the same field much like there are different styles of music, but it is all music.

    Just a suggestion, but maybe it gained popularity through "Karma Police", if you hear anyone saying that people "buzz like fridges", or reports of people being akin to "detuned radios" please let me know, as this is vital to my theory.

  • by Grishnakh (216268) on Friday March 30, 2007 @07:02PM (#18551233)
    You (by which I mean, Americans) wouldn't say "mathematic"... or would you?

    No, but I wouldn't say "maths" either.

    It's a lot easier to say it without the 's' on the end.

    American English is full of things like this. Get over it. It's just like how we changed the "-ise" suffix to "-ize", because it looks like it sounds that way. Or how we got rid of the 'u' in colour, etc., because it's not pronounced.

    Like it or not, that's how it is, and it's been that way for around 200 years (the early colonists intentionally made many of these changes).

Disclaimer: "These opinions are my own, though for a small fee they be yours too." -- Dave Haynie

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