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$99 HD-DVD Player Coming Soon? 257

Posted by CowboyNeal
from the first-one's-free dept.
Frank writes "Rumors of the high definition holy grail persist. The latest is that Toshiba will be offering their basic HD-A2 player at $99 for one week only, beginning July 22. An added bonus is three free HD-DVD's."
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$99 HD-DVD Player Coming Soon?

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  • by streetphantom (1075615) on Saturday July 14, 2007 @12:22PM (#19859959)
    Blue Ray is being given away with Cornflakes soon.
  • by Bob Gelumph (715872) on Saturday July 14, 2007 @12:23PM (#19859963)
    but will there be enough units to give HD-DVD a good enough foot hold to claw back marketshare from bluray?
    • by dunezone (899268) on Saturday July 14, 2007 @01:05PM (#19860211) Journal
      Marketshare? Ill be honest, I haven't seen one Blu-ray or HD-DVD player in someones house yet nor do I know anyone that owns one. Wait, I take that back Ive see one Blu-ray player and thats a PS3.

      Is it just me? Is it the Chicago area and we just refuse to buy into it? Ive read countless articles on which one is better, which will win, and that the Blu-ray has already won. And I still haven't seen one outside a store yet.
      • It might be a Chicago thing. I haven't heard of anyone taking the HD-DVD/Blu-Ray plunge here either.
      • Is it just me? Is it the Chicago area and we just refuse to buy into it? Ive read countless articles on which one is better, which will win, and that the Blu-ray has already won. And I still haven't seen one outside a store yet.

        I think that doesn't prove anything other than Anecdotal evidence. For a "new product" and in a certain price range, a product can be a big hit... but still be on a small scale.

        I drive around a Mercedes Benz Sprinter (or whatever brand you want to associate with it), and they have b
    • by timeOday (582209)
      It's probably a loss-leader, but I'm willing to bet the loss on each unit is less than on the leading Blu-Ray player. (Granted, that one is rumored to play video games as well, but it seems to have been an afterthought :)
    • Why loss-leader??? If somehow corps can make a profit selling DVD players (regular kind) players for under $30, why can't they make a profit selling HD-DVD players for $99???

      Hardware is just about the same, except for some different (similarly cheaply mass-produced) components.

      When they quote "oh, it costs us such and such to make these things, therefore we're selling them for such and such..." it's all bull shit. It doesn't cost them any more than it is to make regular DVD players.
      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by jridley (9305)
        Probably largely true, but the video decoding part is going to require a lot more horsepower. A DVD MPEG2 stream can be played by very lightweight parts these days, but last I heard the chips that play HD streams are powerful enough that they require cooling fans. According to the MythTV howtos I've read, playing HDs on PCs requires a hefty graphics card that costs probably $300+ and about a 3GHZ machine. By contrast, you can play regular DVDs on a 600 MHz machine with an 8-year-old graphics card that yo
        • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

          by PygmySurfer (442860)
          That doesn't sound right - the Intel GMA950 (crappy onboard graphics chipset) can decode two HD streams at once. It doesn't even require a fan.
          • Not by itself, it can't. It needs at least a moderately powerful processor attached to it. Integrated graphics still offload a lot of work to the CPU.

            Note that the AppleTV, with a ULV 1GHz Pentium M, needs a Geforce 7300 chip in it to play 720p video. If Apple could run this thing with Intel integrated graphics, they would, to reduce heat and save money. However, to do HD video with GMA950, you'd need to move up to "budget laptop" specs, probably at least a modern 1.5GHz single-core processor. To play
  • by magarity (164372) on Saturday July 14, 2007 @12:25PM (#19859969)
    An added bonus is three free HD-DVD's
     
    Pink Flamingos, Alone in the Dark, and The Star Wars Holiday Special.
    • Quite a few die-hard Star Wars fans would pay $99 to be able to buy the Holiday Special. Even the crappy home-video rip is remarkably popular, if only for the humor value.

      And it would be even more popular among the disillusioned George Lucas haters.
  • I wouldn't buy it (Score:5, Informative)

    by Durrok (912509) <calltechsucksNO@SPAMgmail.com> on Saturday July 14, 2007 @12:25PM (#19859973) Homepage Journal
    I might use it if they give it away. This player has numerous issues, highlighted here.

    For those of you who don't like to click links:

    The HD-A2 is the least capable of the current crop of HD-DVD players available from Toshiba. Both of the other two models, the HD-A20 (Buy now) and the HD-XA2 (Buy now), support 1080p video. In fact the HD-A20 is nearly identical to the HD-A2, it just adds 1080p for an extra $100 more on the MSRP. So the odds that a firmware upgrade will ever be available for the HD-A2 to allow 1080p are pretty slim. How would you explain that to someone who bought an HD-A20? The HD-XA2 also comes with HDMI 1.3, better video processing, and gold plated input jacks. But the HD-A2 is the one that's getting all the hot sale prices, so it appears to be the most popular right now. But if you shop around, you might find a great deal on the HD-A20. For example, right now it's only about $25 more than the HD-A2 at the HT Guys store (as of 6/22).
    • Dammit (Score:5, Informative)

      by Durrok (912509) <calltechsucksNO@SPAMgmail.com> on Saturday July 14, 2007 @12:29PM (#19860005) Homepage Journal
      The link was there in the preview, I swear! Here it is [hdtvmagazine.com]
    • by John Betonschaar (178617) on Saturday July 14, 2007 @01:18PM (#19860301)
      So if you just have a 720p TV (like I do) and don't care about 'HDMI 1.3' (whatever benefit you might get from that) or gold-plated connectors (for *digital* signals??), it's actually at least a half-decent player?
      • by Durrok (912509)
        Sure, until you get a 1080p a year or two down the road. Just seems kinda shortsighted not to spend the extra $100 and to get a player that is going to support you for much longer.
        • by Basehart (633304)
          "...spend the extra $100 and to get a player that is going to support you for much longer."

          It's like buying a walking stick without a rubber plug thing on the end. Why spend $70 for a regular walking stick without a plug thing when you can spend an extra $5 and get one with one on it, on the end there. So that's $75 with a plug as opposed to $70 for one without one. Seems like a no-brainer to me. Spend the extra $100 and think of the future you. You'll thank yourself down the road.
        • by 7Prime (871679)
          Why would I get a 1080p set a year or two down the road? I had my last SDTV for 10 years, and I just spent $450 on a new HD set.
        • by Wdomburg (141264)
          The HD-A20 costs about $320 right now, so make that an extra $220. And most peoples brains to money ratio are such that they won't be buying new televisions every year or two.
        • by jridley (9305)
          Sure, except in the context of this sale (if real, and if generally available), it's $99 versus $400.

          I have a 720p projector, and I'm very unlikely to get a 1080 one for at least 5 years. It'd be nice to get a player that did 720p. For $99, who the hell cares if I throw it away in 3 or 4 years?

          I actually probably wouldn't even spend $400 versus $300 for 1080. It was a big step for me and a lot of money for me to get the 720p projector, and it really is going to be quite a while before I upgrade it. I'd
      • I'm going to take the question mark at the end seriously.

        Honestly, a regular def DVD looks pretty decent on a good quality 42" 720p display. HDDVD would probably look good on something much larger or very close in detail (like when you pause to want to read a name on a movie character's shirt).

        Why would you WANT to watch HDDVD on 720p display? You really aren't getting much more than the much cheaper to rent or buy DVD disc. It isn't just the cost of the player, the cost of the movies!

        And no, it probably
        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by 7Prime (871679)
          Ummm... no

          Resolution aside, you still get two things that a DVD player won't do: progressive scan, and widescreen. To be honest, the biggest visual difference *I* see between SD and HD is getting rid of interlaced video. NTSC resolution is actually pretty good at the distances you usually watch TV. But with the flicker that interlacing causes, NTSC is crap. SD -> ED is a much bigger jump in quality than ED -> HD. So, for me the difference between 720p and 1080p is a drop in the bucket.
          • by jridley (9305)
            I've got an upsampling DVD player with HDMI output into a 720p projector. I don't have interlacing when I play my regular DVD movies. The player does both progressive scan and widescreen.
            • by 7Prime (871679)
              well, deinterlacing isn't the same as natively progressive, though.
              • well, deinterlacing isn't the same as natively progressive, though.

                It is for most films on DVD, though not for NTSC TV.

                The process is called IVTC [wikipedia.org], and it reconstructs the original progressive frames, if the source was progressive before being put on DVD.

                It doesn't work for NTSC TV, where the source is interlaced and was put on DVD interlaced. For that you need smart de-interlacing that is likely to cause blurriness due to combining two slightly different interlaced fields into a frame.

                (I do IVTC every time

      • by timeOday (582209) on Saturday July 14, 2007 @02:54PM (#19860867)
        Especialy since the cheap player does output 1080i (following the above link). Personally would not pay double to get the "p." There are hardly any 1080p movies out anyways, and I don't think the difference from 1080i would be noticeable. Paying double for a small degree of "future-proofing" is not a good value in my book.
      • by Wdomburg (141264)
        Gold is a non-corrosive and highly conductive. Good choice for plating contacts and connectors. For the quantity necessary for that application, it's not even particularly expensive from a manufacturing perspective.
    • Re:I wouldn't buy it (Score:5, Interesting)

      by santakrooz (517854) on Saturday July 14, 2007 @02:56PM (#19860877)
      1080p vs 1080i is a non-feature when it comes to HDDVD or BluRay that Sony has "invented" for marketing purposes. Here is why. Movies are filmed at 24 frames per second. They are displayed at 30frames or 60frames per second on high def DVD formats. All HDDVD and BluRay content is stored on disc in "1080p" meaning 1080x1920 full frame non-interlaced. Your 1080p display can take 1080i input from a 1080i source such as the A2 and will recombine fields to create full frame images. 1080p displays don't actually display anything interlaced. So when you're watching a 1080i source on a 1080p television you are actually effectively seeing 1080p 30frames per second instead of 1080p 60frames per second. You will not see a single bit of difference because the content is 24fps to begin with. Even 100% digitally filmed/produced movies such as CG cartoons (Nemo) or movies (Star Wars Prequels) are still mastered at 24fps...

      1080p is good for displaying 1080 content that is higher than 30 frames per second - such as video games. Basically with 1080i you're limited to 30 frames per second at 1080 vs 60 frames for 1080p. Playstation has 1080p because it's a game machine and 1080p provides potential for higher framerates at 1080 for gaming which is advantageous. But for movies? the difference betweek i and p is meaningless.

      • by evilviper (135110)

        Your 1080p display can take 1080i input from a 1080i source such as the A2 and will recombine fields to create full frame images.

        3:2 pulldown reversal has never been, and never will be perfect. You will have artifacts from the unnecessary two conversion steps.

        So when you're watching a 1080i source on a 1080p television you are actually effectively seeing 1080p 30frames per second instead of 1080p 60frames per second.

        You're omitting the fact that deinterlacing is a difficult and inexact process that horribl

    • Re:I wouldn't buy it (Score:5, Interesting)

      by Shabbs (11692) on Saturday July 14, 2007 @03:39PM (#19861141)
      1080p is marketing hype. Feeding a 1080i or a 1080p signal to a 1080p TV will be EXACTLY the same if the source is HD DVD or Blu-ray.

      Now, 1080p/24 is interesting. The HD-A20 and XA2 are going to be getting firmware updates to allow 1080p/24 output. The HD-A2 will not get this update. That is cool, if you have a 1080p/24 device you can watch HD film as it should be. But, how many people have a 1080p/24 display device? How many are even out there? Very few.

      Cheers.
      • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

        by MrDERP (1004577)
        Well, I am not sure, but I have heard, that It's good to set the refresh rate to 72Hz for watching movies because 3 * 24 = 72 so every 3 refresh cycles the movie syncs with the HDTV. Setting it at 60hz they don't sync. Luckily I have an HDTV 42" that supports 72 Hz at 1080p and doubles as a computer monitor. Highly recomended Westinghouse, the only thing I ever got at best buy for a good price (was an "open box" deal.. Anyway my point.. Set your HDTV/Monitor to 72 Hz so it will sync up with 24 fps movies.
        • by Shabbs (11692)
          Blu-ray and HD DVD source are both 1080p/24 natively on the disc. So, if you have a player that can output 1080p/24 and a display that can show 1080p/24 you will see the native format, untouched. The less conversions, the better. Right now, it goes 1080p/24 (disc) --> 1080i/60 (leaving the player) --> 1080p/60 on the TV. The signal gets touched quite a bit.

          Cheers.
      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by evilviper (135110)

        Feeding a 1080i or a 1080p signal to a 1080p TV will be EXACTLY the same

        That would be true if your TV has perfect 3:2 pulldown reversal... which doesn't exist.

        Feeding hard telecined 24fps material guarantees artifacts.
        • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

          by Shabbs (11692)
          The only way to avoid the 3:2 pull down is to have a 24fps device. So, a 1080p/24 source (like HD DVD or Blu-ray) output to a 1080p/24 capable display device will eliminate the issue you keep posting about.

          For others, more info about 3:2 pull down (Telecline) can be found here:

            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Telecine#3:2_pulldown [wikipedia.org]

          Cheers.
  • Ya, sure just 1 week. 3 weeks later, a new special for $69 :)
  • wow (Score:2, Interesting)

    by androvsky (974733)
    In today's class, we'll look at how to tell who's losing a format war...

    This is why Toshiba's having trouble getting other hardware manufacturers on board, with them selling at such a loss. Sure HD-DVD is supposed to be cheaper than blu-ray for disc pressing, but the players have pretty much the same specs, it can't be that much cheaper for Toshiba to build them.

    • by DrXym (126579)
      This is why Toshiba's having trouble getting other hardware manufacturers on board, with them selling at such a loss. Sure HD-DVD is supposed to be cheaper than blu-ray for disc pressing, but the players have pretty much the same specs, it can't be that much cheaper for Toshiba to build them.

      Exactly HD-DVD & Blu-Ray share the same blue laser diode, similar hardware specs, and a similar software stack. If HD-DVD players are selling for less than Blu-Ray it is because Toshiba is heavily subsidizing them

    • by TheMeuge (645043)
      The players probably cost $20 to make.
      • Re:wow (Score:4, Insightful)

        by toleraen (831634) on Saturday July 14, 2007 @12:56PM (#19860157)
        Yeah, and the R&D probably cost 'em $50, a couple pizzas, a case of beer, and a long weekend.
        • by orasio (188021)

          Yeah, and the R&D probably cost 'em $50, a couple pizzas, a case of beer, and a long weekend.

          R&D doesn't have marginal cost.
          The whole idea of selling at a loss is gaining traction in order to sell big volumes.
          Nintendo could sell the Wii at $1000 to pay for R&D, but probably they pay for it sooner selling tons of units at a cheaper price, because R&D doesn't have marginal cost!
          R&D is a sunk cost. It doesn't affect unit price. They price stuff based on marginal cost, and marketing.

          It's the total earnings that count.
          Even selling at a loss is good for paying R&D costs, because you

          • by jridley (9305)
            It was a joke. He didn't say that was a marginal cost, he was poking fun at the $20 by saying that the ENTIRE R&D cost was $50 plus pizza and beer.
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Locutus (9039)
      that was what I was thinking when I read this. What I've noticed recently was that when marketshare numbers where put out on HD players, they would note later on that the PS3 shipments were excluded and that, IMO, shows that HD-DVD is losing. Having to play tricks with market share numbers is one indicator of what's really going on and this price cut also shows who's got to try harder to get customers. Who in their right mind wouldn't pick up a PS3 for their HD video( BluRay ) player when for maybe $100 you
      • by Sancho (17056)
        Lots of problems here.

        What I've noticed recently was that when marketshare numbers where put out on HD players, they would note later on that the PS3 shipments were excluded and that, IMO, shows that HD-DVD is losing.

        If you buy a Bluray player, there's a damned good chance that you bought it to play Bluray discs. If you buy an HD-DVD player, there's a damned good chance that you bought it to play HD-DVDs. But according to one report, 70% of console owners don't realize that their game systems play DVD discs[1] [theglobeandmail.com]. It seems like including every PS3 purchase (many of which were returned due to problems/lack of games) as a Bluray player sale artificially inflates the success of Bluray. Excluding the

        • If you buy a Bluray player, there's a damned good chance that you bought it to play Bluray discs. If you buy an HD-DVD player, there's a damned good chance that you bought it to play HD-DVDs. But according to one report, 70% of console owners don't realize that their game systems play DVD discs[1]. It seems like including every PS3 purchase (many of which were returned due to problems/lack of games) as a Bluray player sale artificially inflates the success of Bluray. Excluding them entirely may not be fair,
          • by Sancho (17056)
            Your arguments are wholly unsupported. I at least provided a link which gave some data.

            Also, you don't have to be confrontational to get your point across. "I suppose you could substitute your own reality?" That was unnecessary to a good argument. I'll be ignoring further posts by you.

            Good day to you, sir.
        • by Cowclops (630818)
          "I've been wanting an upscaling DVD player, anyway,"

          Either your TV doesn't need to scale the image (because its a 480i CRT) or it MUST be scaled to the native res (because its an LCD). An unscaled image on an LCD would have black bars around the outside and it would be the wrong pixel ratio.

          Since scaling must occur somewhere, it either happens in the TV or the DVD player. The only way an upscaling DVD player can be "better" than just plugging 480i from your DVD player to your TV is if the TV's built in hard
          • by Sancho (17056)
            First of all, you make a quite large and erroneous assumption. I actually have a CRT HDTV, so there isn't the fixed-pixel problem you mention.

            Second, one of the benefits of an upscaling DVD player is that it produces a signal which is, natively, one of the common HD resolutions. No TV that I've seen takes the digital data on the disc and rescales it to the appropriate resolution--rather, they take the signal and scale it. This can lead to distortion and/or unnecessary bits of the picture being cut off.
      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        While tempting, I still don't want to get caught with a device only supported by such a limited market. Not to mention such a lowend device/player.

        Thats what i was thinking at first, too, but for $100 for the player, and another couple bucks a month on my netflix, i can have an essentially throw-away player if HD-DVD loses, and not really need to own any movies I'd get stuck with. Its actually kindof a tempting deal if you're willing to just count the $100 as a loss from the get-go.

      • by Wdomburg (141264)
        Who in their right mind wouldn't pick up a PS3 for their HD video( BluRay ) player when for maybe $100 you get a 3rd Gen game console thrown in?

        s/maybe $100/twice as much/ (at current market prices)
        s/maybe $100/$400 more/ (if the deal mentioned in the link is available)

        And with the PS3 you're getting a player that doesn't auto-play when you swap discs (unless you power the player off), doesn't have a remote control, is incompatible with standard universal remotes, and draws a whopping 170W (even playing
      • by jridley (9305)
        Who in their right mind wouldn't pick up a PS3 for their HD video( BluRay ) player when for maybe $100 you get a 3rd Gen game console thrown in?

        I've got no use whatsoever for a game console, and a PS3 is going to look like crap in my media equipment stack.
  • by DrXym (126579) on Saturday July 14, 2007 @12:28PM (#19860001)
    The blog makes it sound like only show attendees may be able to apply for this. I don't see how they could offer it to the general public unless Toshiba was prepared to lose hundreds of millions in a last gasp bid to win the format war.
  • $50 (Score:4, Funny)

    by Anne Thwacks (531696) on Saturday July 14, 2007 @12:29PM (#19860007)
    If only we could get $50 HDI cables to go with it!
  • by jsldub (133194) on Saturday July 14, 2007 @12:31PM (#19860017)
    Did you read the fine print in the press release?

    Questex Media Group provides certain customer contact data (such as customers' names, addresses, phone numbers and e-mail addresses) to third parties who with to promote relevant products, services, and other opportunities which may be of interest to you...
    • by timeOday (582209)
      Wow, they throw in free opportinuties of interest!? Now if only it were bundled with a two-year commitment to AT&T wireless...
  • ...for my PC. THAT'S what I'm waiting for. RO media is so passe.
  • by josquint (193951) on Saturday July 14, 2007 @01:16PM (#19860289) Homepage
    Its a promotional stunt to promote the conference!

    Now, next time I walk into Mall Wart and see a (name brand) HD-DVD or Blu-ray player for $148.97, then THAT will be a big deal.
  • by josquint (193951) on Saturday July 14, 2007 @01:26PM (#19860343) Homepage
    It looks like the only information is an email from a listserve?

    Umm.. I just got several emails promising to enlarge body parts, improve bodily functions, and sell me prescription drugs at unreal prices. An the fax I got the other day lets me in on an offere to go to Disney World for $69. So what?

    So a slashdot article now has come down to some dude posting the cool spam they got?
  • by mustafap (452510) on Saturday July 14, 2007 @01:29PM (#19860363) Homepage
    > HD-A2 player at $99 for one week only, beginning July 22.

    What, and then we give it back after the weekend?
  • by BlueParrot (965239) on Saturday July 14, 2007 @01:39PM (#19860413)
    We know for sure that SONY cannot win a format war because then the universe would implode. We also know that Toshiba is not winning this format war. The logical conclusion is that the whole HD-DVD concept is about to fail miserably in favour of increased internet bandwidth and magnetic storage. Heck, the standard offers over where I am is already in excess of 5 mbit. By the time either HD DVD format has a chance to overtake DVD ( guessing 5-10 years at least ) it will be more than enough to doom the entire HD-DVD concept. Unless the MPAA can cripple broadband deployment in key markets ( read US ) sufficiently of course.
    • We know for sure that SONY cannot win a format war because then the universe would implode. We also know that Toshiba is not winning this format war. The logical conclusion is that the whole HD-DVD concept is about to fail miserably in favour of increased internet bandwidth and magnetic storage. Heck, the standard offers over where I am is already in excess of 5 mbit. By the time either HD DVD format has a chance to overtake DVD ( guessing 5-10 years at least ) it will be more than enough to doom the entire
    • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

      by noidentity (188756)
      "Optic storage is losing the format war"

      Where will I store my eyeglasses and magnifiers in the future?!?

  • Wake me up when one format is open, either by unilateral action by whoever controls the format (say, Sony gets a conscience), or by cracking it so thoroughly that we can have something like a libaacs to rival libdvdcss.

    Or if it happens to both at once, the winner will be whichever has the best price/storage deal. (If it happens to both at once, I'm rooting for Blu-Ray, but that's only because I like the idea of using a real programming language (Java) instead of some hacked-together "menu" system.)

    Until it'
    • That's becoming a big part of it for me. With Handbrake and ffmpegX, I can take a DVD movie and put it on any device I want (and no, I don't file-stea...share). The convenience of watching movies on my laptop during long airplane trips without swapping discs is great, plus it's nice to have movie playing in a corner of my screen while working at home.

      Until either format can do that, count me out.
  • by zymano (581466) on Saturday July 14, 2007 @02:38PM (#19860737)
    I will be pissed still if we can't FF through those damn things.

    If i buy it I should be able to CONTROL MY DAMN MACHINE.

    Sue the manufacturers?
  • Won't buy till... (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Nonillion (266505) on Saturday July 14, 2007 @02:47PM (#19860811)
    I for one WON'T be buying till the machines include the following.

    1.15 pin VGA connector
    2.DVI connector
    3.component RCA connectors
    4.composite connector
    5.RF 'F' connector

    I recently looked at several HD-DVD machines, all of them have HDMI and component connectors, NO VGA, no DVI. Uh excuse me, that's NOT good enough. If Toshiba, Sony and others expect me to jump on the HD wagon they're just going to have to offer these connections at FULL RESOLUTION. I am not about to go out and buy another TV just for the HDMI connector. I don't care about the MPAA, I don't pirate their fucking shit anyway. I just want to be able to watch HD on ANY monitor I choose, period.
    • Re:Won't buy till... (Score:5, Informative)

      by dpaton.net (199423) on Saturday July 14, 2007 @03:43PM (#19861169) Homepage Journal
      Sorry, you're delusional. Asking for HD output on a commodity composite connector is like asking for GB ethernet on a cat3 cable.

      Component can only do 1080p over short distances without the addition of expensive repeater boxes or expensive cables.

      VGA is the same.

      An F connector could, if you got people to change to expensive high grade coax and got all the TV manufacturers to put GOOD ATSC tuners in their sets.

      DVI is dead as a consumer A/V interface. It's still great for computers, but it offers no A/V connection capability. People don't like dealing with a mountain of cables. Yes, the change to HDMI was industry driven, but it was also consumer driven. It was generally good thing, despite the inferior connector that HDMI came with.

      If you're really intent on complaining about the HDMI/DVI issue, spend $20 over at Parts Express and get a DVI to HDMI adapter cable [partsexpress.com]. I use two, they work just fine.

      Honestly, your bitching and whining post struck me like someone asking their computer to support dual layer DVDs and magtape at the same time. It's just lame and uneducated.

      I'm not going to get into the DRM argument, but suffice it to say that for the short term, if you want 1080p, you need a digital connection. That means DVI or HDMI. You don't get any other choices. Put up or shut up.
  • by MSTCrow5429 (642744) on Saturday July 14, 2007 @03:02PM (#19860913)
    What is the business/marketing logic behind selling them at a presumed loss for 1 week only? I'm quite happy with my cheap Apex DVD player that is maybe 4-5 years old or so, and have no plans to move to anything else, as I'm also quite happy with my 15 year old 20" TV set. It does seem to me that Blue-Ray is far and away the winner of this very brief format war, so maybe this is just an attempt to sell some HD-DVD players while they still can?
  • Do I care if a $99 HD-DVD player is coming soon? I think the whole HD business is a stinky mess. As for the $99, I expect players cheaper than that to be available sooner or later.
  • As I read this heading, I can't help but comment on a conversation I heard today at Best Buy. As I waited for the clerk to finish with a customer to ask if an item was in stock (RE4 for Wii) I overheard him assure the customer that the format wars was over and that BluRay was going to be dominant. The customer stated that he didn't want to make the BetaMax mistake.
    The sad thing is that although there's increasing support for BluRay from the content providers, there is still not a compelling reason or a k
  • Or at least really cheap. Then we (the media corporations) can lock you in and rape you at our leisure.

    That's all it's about folks.
  • Ok so if you get to pick the 3 free HD-DVD's, it might be. But as I've said in the past the only way to get main stream penetration for either format is to make them equally priced as a regular standard DVD player is now. I can walk into Wal-Mart now and pick up a nice little dvd player for $60-70. Sure it doesn't have a shit ton of features but it plays dvd's which is all I require. When I can pick up a HD-DVD player or Blu-Ray for $50-70 then I'll buy one. This deal is pretty nice itself, but they probabl
  • For comparison's sake, the online price of that unit from Walmart is $299. A 2/3rd's discount off a Wal*Mart price is probably half the cost of making one.
  • If HDDVD doesn't pull ahead and win this I will be a very pissed off consumer. It's not like I actually have bought into it yet, I'm not that stupid, but the only reason bluray has any market share at all is pure consumer stupidity and a distinct disinterest in saving any money whatsoever. When this whole mess started and they presented us with two formats, one being signifgantly cheaper to manufacture than the other, why EVERYONE didn't immediatly back the cheaper one I do not understand. How bluray is
  • I can hear the swarm of rednecks talking about how much better their Dale Earnhart DVD looks on the 5 year old bigscreen sitting in their garage they're still paying Rent-A-Center for with their new $99 HDDVD player now.
    I don't care who you are, that's funny right there.

We don't know one millionth of one percent about anything.

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