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Democracy Player Is Dead, Long Live Miro 296

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the lesson-in-marketing-101 dept.
MrSpin writes "Democracy Player has relaunched today as Miro. Developed by the Participatory Culture Foundation, Miro aims to make online video "as easy as watching TV", while at the same time ensuring that the new medium remains accessible to everyone, through its support for open standards. The open-source application combines a media player and library, content guide, video search engine, as well as podcast and BitTorrent clients. But why the name change? According to last100, who have published a full review and guide to Miro: "When Democracy Player launched back in February 2006, the feedback received was that the name evoked different, yet equally negative responses. For many Americans it conjured up an image of yet another left wing media project, and to the rest of the world it was, rather bizarrely, being associated with the policies of the Bush administration. In contrast, the new name is purposely abstract.""
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Democracy Player Is Dead, Long Live Miro

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  • by InvisblePinkUnicorn (1126837) on Wednesday July 18, 2007 @09:03AM (#19900309)
    Is there any reason to use Miro rather than VLC or BS Player? These seem to handle everything I've encountered.
    • by ringfinger (629332) * on Wednesday July 18, 2007 @09:17AM (#19900523) Homepage
      According to the article, Miro's content guide is one of it's strengths -- making it more than just a player.

      Miro's content guide is far better than the equivalent video podcast directory in iTunes. Not only does Miro list over 1,500 channels but it's also better organized, with content filtered by popularity, editor picks, genre, tags, and language. There's even a section dedicated to HD video.

      Still, I have a hard time imagining how a good content buide is better than having google seaarch behind it when looking for content (as youtube does).

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Oscaro (153645)
      s there any reason to use Miro rather than VLC or BS Player?

      No. Actually, I switched back to VLC almost instantly. It's totally unusable and awfully bloated.
      • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

        by sumdumass (711423)

        It's totally unusable and awfully bloated
        For some reasons, this probably means a lot of people will like it. I can remeber those exact words being said about almost everything else the got popular. I think some people (not you) like making this difficult for themselves.
      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by Bin_jammin (684517)
        Agreed. I believe this is actually name number 3 for this project. I've been a fan of the idea since it was announced (if I recall, in 2004 if I recall correctly) having downloaded almost every initial beta. Unfortunately whatever name it's been under I've never been impressed by the execution. Considering it uses torrents for content delivery it severely chokes bandwidth locally. Another gripe I've had with it is that downloaded content can be wrapped in order to let it expire from your machine. I'm sure
        • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

          by Darundal (891860)
          DL speeds are much faster now, and there is a ton of content. I have noticed no DRM (having no trouble playing anything downloaded with Xine). However, the last release had a slight issue where it decided to stop working on loads of linux systems, which thankfully the current version doesn't exactly have (at least so far).
    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by HomerNet (146137)
      Yes, actually, it is different. Whether you like iTunes or not would be a good indicator of whether you'll like Democracy/Miro. If VLC were like WinAmp, Democracy/Miro would be iTunes. It's a way of managing the videos you want to watch.

      In terms o feature-ness, Miro allows you to create playlists, automatic watch lists, and integrates video searches from Google, Yahoo, and a couple others. It's also a bittorrent client for videos, though admittedly I haven't figured out how to use that feature. One thi
    • by NetDanzr (619387)
      Please educate me; I'm pretty new to this. I've been using the Democracy Player for a while now, and I'll keep on using it (it prompts me to upgrade, but I ignore that). My main reason for using it is the automatic download of new episodes of German news broadcasts and Democracy Now, which I then can watch at my convenience. Does VLC or BS Player do the same? If so, I'll be happy to try it - they can't be worse than the 350MB of memory that Democracy Player hogs.
    • by misleb (129952)
      I don't really think there is much of a comparison. I played around with Miro when it was called Democracy Player. And it was much much more than just a player. It was supposed to be this whole way of managing, subscribing to, and downloading video. It is like iTunes with some free "channels" and a program guide, but it also includes things like a Bittorrent client.

      I never really got into it if only because I don't care to use my computer like a TV. Most of my major video downloads to directly to a MythTV b
  • Creepy (Score:3, Interesting)

    by boaworm (180781) <boaworm@gmail.com> on Wednesday July 18, 2007 @09:04AM (#19900313) Homepage Journal
    Creepy that so many people associate "Democracy" with bad things. Actually scares me...
    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by hey (83763)
      Partly/Mostly our president's fault. By bringing "democracy" to Iraq. Who would want that kind of "democracy" on their desktop!
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      Is it any stranger than associating "communism" or "socialism" with bad things? The ideals are generally good natured, it's the context attached to them that has become corrupt.
      • by boaworm (180781)
        That's taking it a bit too far i'd say.

        Quite a few "Democracy" experiments turned out quite well, especially when you compare the number of successful communist countries that turned out.. quite well...

        Regarding the matter at hand, as the OP, i find it really scary that these guys felt the need to/were forced to replace the name "Democracy" because some people dont like what Mr Bush is doing. There are quite a few other democracies on this planet that are doing OK. The original greek democracy only included
        • The problem is, people confuse communism with dictatorship and/or totalitarianism when really, they are mutually exclusive.

          There has never been any modern communist government in the past few hundred years.

          A real communist country WOULD BE a democracy; in fact if you take democracy to it's logical course (where everyone has a say) you inevitably end up with a communist state.

          A true communist country would have

          - A democratically elected government with 100% transparency
          - 100% nationalized economy where all w
          • Israel came pretty close with their kibbutzim.

            It turned out pretty weird though. When all the children in the community are raised communally, they all view each other as if they are biological brothers and sisters and don't really get attracted to each other. Most of them ended up marrying "outsiders".

            Also:
            "When we saw our first children in the playpen, hitting one another, or grabbing toys just for themselves, we were overcome with anxiety. What did it mean that even an education in communal life couldn't
          • - A democratically elected government with 100% transparency
            - 100% nationalized economy where all work equally and are compensated proportionally to their capabilities
            - Total freedom of expression and speech

            You've never read Marx, have you? The work is not meant to be distributed equally. Really.
            The proles do the work for the brains so the brains can relax and think big thoughts.
            Problem is the proles don't like that.

            The problem with reaching this goal, which all totalitarianist status that started out wit

            • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

              by brunes69 (86786)

              BTW, can you name one Communist country that wasn't totalitarian? You said they're 'mutually exclusive' however I have yet to see an instance where a Communist country was NOT totalitarian.

              That is my whole point. Communism is the antithesis of capitalism, which are both economic ideologies, not political ones. Totalitarianism is the antithesis of democracy, which are political ideologies, not economic ones. But the general public is always grouping these things together when really they have nothing to do

          • Communism is impossible given the nature of current humanity. Now maybe if you gave everyone lobotomies. Communism is the natural refuge of dictators who want to control sheep from behind the curtain of ideology. Fascism is the natural refuge of dictators who dispose of the curtain.
          • The problem is, people confuse communism with dictatorship and/or totalitarianism when really, they are mutually exclusive.

            There has never been any modern communist government in the past few hundred years.

            A real communist country WOULD BE a democracy; in fact if you take democracy to it's logical course (where everyone has a say) you inevitably end up with a communist state.

            It doesn't matter what "real" communism is. Every attempt at Communism has turned into vicious totalitarianism. "Real" Communism is an abstraction. The fact is, there is something about either the Communist system, or the people who are attracted to Communism, that makes any real world attempt at "real" Communism impossible.

            It would be kind of like I started a philosophy called "Chocolatism" that said "If you eat nothing but chocolate, you will live forever"... Then, when people ate nothing but chocolate a

      • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

        by Anonymous Coward
        I wish I had mod points. You are being modded down because of the exact thing you are talking about. Ironic, isn't it?
    • Re:Creepy (Score:5, Insightful)

      by SolitaryMan (538416) on Wednesday July 18, 2007 @09:28AM (#19900719) Homepage Journal

      Creepy that so many people associate "Democracy" with bad things. Actually scares me...

      Well, Bush and friends have done to the word "democracy" what Stalin and comrades have done to the words "socialism" and "communism"

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      Currently our democracy is a shining example of bad things. Its broken in every way, and that is why people around the world are down on it to an extent. It's not democracy itself, but our form of democracy, which is really a corporate driven government full of corruption with little real progress, change, or responsibility. We do scary things because power is unchecked. Our election system is broken and corrupt. Our sense of governing is broken and corrupt.

      Our idea of political debate is standing in an emp
      • Very nicely put. Why haven't you been slammed as some kind of hippie or commie yet? Obviously I'm joking, but truly it seems these days anyone who observes the lack of clothing is flamebait. I was bothered by the American reaction of "Democracy" evoking left wing media tricks. Where the hell does that come from?
      • We cant even provide healthcare for our people, and we're in serious fucking debt and we refuse to tax the corporations that now have the highest dow jones ever... SOMETHING is serverely broken... and by something, i mean everything.

        What a fucking twit. Currently we're running around 3 trillion in debt each year because of your precious health care and safety net in the form of Medicare and SocSec, but you never see that reported because our gov. is highly dishonest about the way it calculates debt.

        Econ 101 asshole, so listen up. There are two primary types of accounting. The first is known as cash accounting. It's what you or I, or really, really small companies use. The second is known as accrual accounting. It's what every ma

    • by MikeRT (947531) on Wednesday July 18, 2007 @09:48AM (#19900987) Homepage
      Everytime you hear crap about "saving our democracy" you ought to cringe. Democracy and freedom are not the same thing. You can have a monarchy and have a free society. You can have a democracy or representative democracy and have a society that is all but a police state. The abuse most commonly occurs when leftists criticize actions by regimes like the Bush Administration.

      Truth is, America was a lot freer when we weren't even a democracy in name. When our founders created our country, only 1/3 of the federal body politic was directly elected. We had the lowest taxes, fewest regulations, our federal civil service was actually serving, rather than ruling, the people and federal police powers were few and far between. Today, well, speaks for itself.

      I'm glad they changed the name. Their project has a lot more to do with freedom than democracy.
      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by uradu (10768)
        > Everytime you hear crap about "saving our democracy" you ought to cringe.
        > Democracy and freedom are not the same thing.

        True on both counts, but not for the reasons you cite.

        > You can have a democracy or representative democracy and have a society that is all but a police state.

        Explain. Just because a country like the ex-GDR called itself democratic didn't make it so. It is not about what a country CALLS itself, but how it FUNCTIONS. If its branches function along truly democratic processes that
        • I read the bit about the police state as implying that USA is now all but a police state . . . which I have heard from many people, mostly travelling here (yes I'm in the USA) from abroad. If it is true, which I am sometimes close to thinking, then it is because we citizens tend to gladly grant our freedom to settle our own affairs to the institutional justice system. The police are now enforcers, rather than a group that serves communities. The mayor of my city called the police force a "para-military"
    • Re: (Score:2, Offtopic)

      by hey! (33014)
      Well, maybe if "democracy" immediately evokes "left wing", there are other conclusions that might follow that than "and therefore democracy is bad."

    • Re:Creepy (Score:4, Insightful)

      by Kenshin (43036) <kenshin@@@lunarworks...ca> on Wednesday July 18, 2007 @10:15AM (#19901463) Homepage
      Essentially, the Bush administration has twisted and perverted the term. "Spreading Democracy" now means "We're gonna invade your country and enforce our will."

      Similarly, before Hitler adopted it for his own nefarious uses, the swastika was seen as a symbol of luck in the west.
      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by DeepHurtn! (773713)
        As is often the case, and contrary to what many Americans would like to believe, the problem goes back much further than Bush. American governments have been pissing on the word Democracy for over 50 years now, and everyone (outside the States, at least) knows that it's just American-speak for "country that does what we tell it", regardless of whether or not it's actually a democracy or a military dictatorship. In fact, if anything, looking at the US's history in Latin America, the word "Democracy" is pro
  • Makes a bigger difference than we realize. Sort of makes you wonder how many other smaller projects don't make it because of a poor name. I hate coming up with a name for anything I work on... Heck there is times when I sit and stare at the screen because I can't think of a good name (that will get me through code review). -Wes
    • Exactly. A good name for a software product is like the location for a restaurant. If you're REALLY good or market a lot people will know you and find you, but otherwise you'll be ignored.
    • This is the third name too. I think the previous name was something like DTV.
  • DP to Miro, Gaim to Pidgin, Beryl and Compiz rejoining... what next? GCC becomes Gnucco?
  • by eldavojohn (898314) * <eldavojohn AT gmail DOT com> on Wednesday July 18, 2007 @09:05AM (#19900331) Journal

    ... and to the rest of the world it was, rather bizarrely, being associated with the policies of the Bush administration.
    I hope, for the sake of everything that I believe in, this is a false statement. It's sad that I have to go on living knowing that while I was alive a man was elected president of my country (twice!) & in that time, he was able to put a foul taste in your mouth upon saying "democracy."

    I guess we can still say that the core ideas of democracy are good, that only awful men with awful goals and intentions used democracy to do wrong. I guess today Marxism sounds like an idea with potential though historically men like Joseph Stalin & Mao Zedong have given it a social stigma that the terrible things they did under its name are inherent and must occur when the idea is put into practice.

    I hope the rest of the world is not convinced that democracy comes hand in hand with the actions of the United States of America today. Hopefully other countries [wikipedia.org] will become model democracies for the rest of the world.

    I hope the theory of democracy is resilient enough to withstand the current administration and that it survives as a concept that can be taught to children as the model of the most fair form of government. I also hope that the rest of the world aspires to become democratic--as has been the popular progression for quite sometime. Ironically, we are tarnishing the image of a system that we hope the Iraqi people to embrace--quite possibly the reason that effort fails.

    The history books will indeed be interesting to read when I am a withered old man.

    I like this quote from Winston Churchill [wikiquote.org] that explains while democracy is not perfect, it is the best we've got:

    Many forms of Government have been tried, and will be tried in this world of sin and woe. No one pretends that democracy is perfect or all-wise. Indeed, it has been said that democracy is the worst form of government except all those other forms that have been tried from time to time.
    • Republic! (Score:2, Insightful)

      by pentalive (449155)
      Remember, the United States has a "Republic" -

      A Democracy is two wolves and a sheep voting for "what's for dinner".

      (hmm, I wonder how you relate a republic to two wolves and a sheep...)
      • Re:Republic! (Score:4, Interesting)

        by hey! (33014) on Wednesday July 18, 2007 @10:21AM (#19901537) Homepage Journal
        If you studied predator to prey relationships, you'd probably recognize that two wolves and a sheep scenario as non-sustainable in any case. You probably need a wolf to sheep ratio of something like 1 : 10 or 1:20. If what we're talking about is one wolf and ten sheep voting on what's for dinner, the wolf is SOL unless he learns to eat grass.

        So this explanation of why the republic subtype of democracy works better than the direct democracy subtype doesn't work.

        There are two reasons that do explain the value of a democratic republic. The first is the impracticality of deciding on everything by a direct vote. The second is that we each play different roles on different issues: we aren't always the sheep or always the wolf in every single question. If we were always in the sheep class, our rational interest would say throw wolves to the, er.. wolves.

        But the reality is that we're all minorities. Maybe it's the people we like to sleep with. Maybe its the fact we like to collect guns. Or look at dirty pictures. Or have heretical ideas. Pure majoritarianism means everybody sooner or later feels the hand of tyranny.

        Our democratic republic works because of a rough and approximate egalitarianism, in which we can see ourselves as belonging to the wolf class or the sheep class. That was the genius of FDR, who was considered a class traitor by many. He realized that a society which was polarized into wolves and sheep had to end up in one kind of tyranny or another, most likely something like what happened in the Soviet Union: a tyranny of a small set of erstwhile sheep. A "social democracy" is not necessarily one of radical egalitarianism, it is one in which no person is for practical purposes relegated to perpetual sheep status.
    • by mwvdlee (775178)
      The reason is probably that the USA portrays itself as the most democratic country (you know, things like the US labelling their presidents "leader of the democratic world"). So if something comming from the US (or atleast, written in English) states itself as being "democratic", the rest of the world is atleast a bit skeptical.
      • by Belacgod (1103921)
        And then there's the Democratic Republic of Congo.

        Democracy has been dragged through the linguistic mud already.

        • by mwvdlee (775178)
          And when Congo claims something to be democratic, the rest of the world would be equally (or perhaps a bit more so) skeptical as when the US would claim such.

          I'm not saying the skepticism is justified, it just seems to be how the rest of the world sees the US.
        • Or let's not forget the German Democratic Republic. Not very Democratic at all!
    • by hey! (33014)
      The thing that makes democracy work in a society like the US is accountability.

      It is the lack of accountability that makes a benevolent dictatorship an impossibility. But without accountability, democracy doesn't work either.

      You need independent information sources, as well as legal checks and balances, to make democracy work. If you don't have that, it really doesn't matter that much how you choose your leaders: you're just being given a choice of dictators.
      • The thing that makes democracy work in a society like the US is accountability.

        That's the optimistic view.

        It seems to me that maintaining a functional system of accountability for any official of the federal government in a country of more than 300 million people may be impossible - especially if you have an economy structured the way the US economy is.

        • by hey! (33014)
          I never said it was easy. But I stand by my statement: US democracy works precisely to the degree that its officials are held to account for their actions.

          The early years of this decade were a low point in government accountability in living memory. But I think that's changing. The blogosphere, as ugly and unwashed as it may be, is allowing people to bypass the mainstream media gatekeepers who are far, far too cozy with the people they are covering.
  • Abstract? (Score:5, Informative)

    by MarcoG42 (1087205) on Wednesday July 18, 2007 @09:06AM (#19900337) Homepage
    I wouldn't call the name abstract, as miro is Spanish for "I watch." Seems perfectly suitable to me.
    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by aichpvee (631243)
      Sssssshhhhhhhhhh... don't ruin the surprise that English isn't the world's only language.
    • In Japanese, "miro" (or the closest phonetic equivalent) is the imperative form of "look", so it works there too.

      • by lawpoop (604919)
        And it kind of sounds like 'Mirror' in English. A perfect name for a community based video player -- a mirror for the community to see itself.
  • by mwvdlee (775178)
    You mean the german Miro (http://www.miro.com) that now produces computer displays, that formerly produced multimedia hardware for computers (http://www.mirosupport.de/)?
    I see absolutely no problem with trademarks here.
  • So now Bush has tarnished Democracy as badly as Stalin tarnished socialism.

    Particularly sad, since neither one practiced either doctrine.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by pete-classic (75983)
      Get a sense of proportion! If we add all of the highest estimates, and then assume they're all gross under-estimates we still can't hang 1,000,000 deaths on Bush. (Please note that I'm not saying that his policies are swell, just establishing an order of magnitude.) The most conservative estimates put Stalin's body count at 3,000,000, and it is almost certainly greater than 10,000,000. This number ignores WWII related deaths!

      Bush's policies are indefensible. Every human life is precious. But for the l
      • by pmsr (560617)
        Right on. But keep in mind that to the parent post a million deaths is most likely a mere statistic. ;-)

        /Pedro
      • This number ignores WWII related deaths!

        As it should. But, have you compared Bush to Stalin over time? According to the Arab press, Bush has already beaten Saddam Hussein for bloodyhandedness - once you adjust the figures for relative time in power. Stalin was in power for decades, and Bush only has eight years to get his slaughtering done. If you divide both by the days in office, what happens to the numbers then? How does Bush score on a level playing field?

        There's no such thing as an "inappropriate" comparison. The results of the proces

      • The grandparent never said Bush was like Stalin. His comments was of the form 'A is to B what C is to D'. Your comment then replied with the form 'You can't compare A to C!'
        • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

          by pete-classic (75983)
          Yes, but B and D are both major systems of government. (Though socialism is really in tension with capitalism, not democracy . . .) Since B and D are so directly comparable it is reasonable to assume that the original poster intended to compare A and C.

          It isn't as if B was democracy and D was the rules at my apartment's swimming pool.

          -Peter
      • by Chandon Seldon (43083) on Wednesday July 18, 2007 @10:37AM (#19901835) Homepage

        The highest estimate for civilian deaths in Iraq that I've heard is 600,000. If we consider the existence of the war in Afganistan, that implies that we *could* get to an estimate 1,000,000 using the method you describe.

  • Bizarre? (Score:3, Insightful)

    by kripkenstein (913150) on Wednesday July 18, 2007 @09:21AM (#19900613) Homepage

    For many Americans it conjured up an image of yet another left wing media project, and to the rest of the world it was, rather bizarrely, being associated with the policies of the Bush administration.

    Not 'bizarre' at all. Actually I and everyone I know expected exactly those reactions, and were therefore puzzled by the name choice of 'Democracy Player'. It was just a half-step better then 'Freedom Player' (to make the comparison to 'Freedom Fries' even clearer, not that there is any need).

    The project itself is a nice idea. Hopefully the misguided name choice didn't set it back too much.
    • by ktappe (747125)

      Not 'bizarre' at all. Actually I and everyone I know expected exactly those reactions
      In no way in your post explain why it was distasteful.

      If you don't like me or my methods and I call myself a kumquat, do you suddenly find the term "kumquat" distasteful? If not, then why does Bush make you dislike "democracy"?

  • by idontgno (624372) on Wednesday July 18, 2007 @09:24AM (#19900647) Journal

    has cleared their trademark with Joan Miro's [wikipedia.org] estate?

    If not, queue intellectual property lawsuits in 5..4..3..

    It's happened before. [sfgate.com]

  • Is that "miro" in French means someone who has very low vision.

    And "Miro", in Spanish is, of course, a famous modern painter [wikipedia.org]... Not exactly very well known for being "easy" to understand.
  • Now they feel "democracy" is tainted too, just because bush tried to use it as a veil. Now you cant use that word that easily. Its just stupid. If some jerk comes and tries to exploit the word "good", what will happen ?
  • Accurate name? (Score:3, Insightful)

    by lawpoop (604919) on Wednesday July 18, 2007 @09:31AM (#19900751) Homepage Journal

    For many Americans it conjured up an image of yet another left wing media project...
    Uh, isn't that exactly what this project is? Don't get me wrong, I'm a lefty. If you have something small scale and open to anyone, then by definition there is going to be more working and middle class voices on it. The traditional media that requires a lot of capital to produce and distribute, such as newspapers, television, and radio, will, by definition, be the voice of its wealthy owners.
    • Except the leaders of left wing movements are almost never working or middle class...Teddy Kennedy, John Edwards, John Kerry. If you check the political opinions of the working and middle class you usually find that they tend to be more conservative.
      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by lawpoop (604919)

        Except the leaders of left wing movements are almost never working or middle class...Teddy Kennedy, John Edwards, John Kerry.

        You're claiming that John Edwards isn't middle class? He's from a solid working class childhood. Wikipedia says [wikipedia.org]:

        Edwards was born on June 10, 1953 to Wallace Reid Edwards and Catharine Juanita "Bobbie" Wade in Seneca, South Carolina. The family moved several times during Edwards' childhood, eventually settling in Robbins, North Carolina, where his father worked as a textile mill floor worker, eventually promoted to supervisor; his mother worked as a postal letter carrier when his father left his job.[2] Edwards was the first person in his family to attend college. He first attended Clemson University and later transferred to North Carolina State University. Edwards graduated with a bachelor's degree in textile technology in 1974 from North Carolina State University, and later earned his law degree from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), both with honors.

        Anyways, the democrat politicians you mention aren't leaders in the sense you are talking about. Left-wingers don't go and do whatever they say. They are more like public servants.

        If you check the political opinions of the working and middle class you usually find that they tend to be more conservative.

        That's not true. There is a broad spectrum of political opinion in the working and middle

        • by simong (32944)
          Hang on a minute, you're suggesting that John Kerry is left wing? I do despair of some Americans. The ones that inhabit Fark, mostly.
    • by sumdumass (711423)
      Working and middle class doesn't doesn't define left wing. The rich and upclass doesn't define either too. I think maybe you should rethink your self described political affiliation is you think that was true.

      It seems contradictory when all the left wing politicians are rich. The class of the people don't denote the political affiliation of them. You need to define further into the classes before you can get close and even they it is a generalization. There are sure to be people who would prove you wrong.
  • by elrous0 (869638) * on Wednesday July 18, 2007 @09:35AM (#19900803)
    The problem isn't the lack of a good PLAYER. The problem is the lack of good CONTENT.

    So how about we focus instead on getting some free resources for the production of decent content? Right now, there is a VERY sharp divide between professional studio productions (that are heavily DRM'ed and can only be accessed by paying $ at sites like iTunes) and crappy home videos/video podcasts that look like they're made in a junior high AV room.

  • Miro happens to be the name of the company that started the Mambo Server open-source CMS project. Since I know they existed before today, they might have a good claim to stop the Miro player from using the Miro name. Software trademarks seem to go across many types of software - Firefox had to change its name to Firefox from Firebird because of the open-source relational database called Firebird. Seeing as though both Miro's Mambo and the Miro player deliver content to users, it would seem they are more
  • I'm sure some looser right wing republican troll will mod this down, but...

    Since when is democracy a left wing idea in America? Wasn't that what we were trying to do in Iraq, bring democracy to Iraq?

    WTF!

  • I wonder if they fixed the horrible torrent support. It always starts fast then bogs down and slows to a crawl. What makes it worse is the inability to see the actual torrent peers information to see if it's a problem with the torrent network or something closer to home.
  • it could have been the Gnu Improved Multimedia Player...

    I'll get my hat... kthxbye
  • by muszek (882567) on Wednesday July 18, 2007 @11:18AM (#19902551) Homepage
    I haven't used DP since it originaly started (and I have to say it didn't sound either right- or left-wing. to me it was just plain stupid). Does the linux version stil suck? It was pretty unusable back then.

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