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New England Patriots Obtain Online Ticket Reseller Names 233

Posted by Zonk
from the nice-way-to-treat-your-fans dept.
Billosaur writes "The New England Patriots sued on-line ticket re-seller StubHub (a subsidiary of eBay) to obtain the list of names of people who tried to buy or sell Patriots tickets using the service. StubHub lost an appeal in Massachusetts state court last week, and was compelled to hand over the list of 13,000 names. It is currently not clear what the Patriots organization intends to do with the names, but they have intimated that they may revoke the privileges of any season ticket holders on the list. The Center for Democracy and Technology, a Washington D.C.-based advocacy group, said the court order to turn over the names infringes on the privacy rights of Patriots fans. At issue is whether using the on-line service allows an end-run around team rules and Massachusetts state law, by allowing ticket holders to charge extreme mark-ups on their tickets." How does this ruling apply to other pieces of transient property?
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New England Patriots Obtain Online Ticket Reseller Names

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  • To be fair... (Score:3, Interesting)

    by SRA8 (859587) on Saturday October 20, 2007 @01:19AM (#21052881)
    in a fair society, venues would be able to set prices at market prices, thus eliminating the need for entities such as stub-hub. However, setting prices at market would likely cause an uproar, so why should anyone have sympathy for organizations/individuals trying to profit from charity to society?
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by wizbit (122290)
      Bingo. I'm an occasional user of StubHub when I need to grab a few extra tickets last-minute, but the gouging that goes on (think Hanna Montana) for highly desirable and rare events just turns the whole model on its head. This kind of exclusivity in the NFL is generally limited to the playoffs, but if you have a perennial champion like the Pats, or just a huge market like NYC, "average" fans get the shaft during the regular season as well.
      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by m0rph3us0 (549631)
        With out the gouging the tickets would be unavailable for purchase. Thus you would have NO TICKETS. Fans don't "get the shaft" they get tickets at a price they are willing to pay.
        • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

          by toriver (11308)
          If the gougers did not hoard tickets for resale, those tickets WOULD be available for purchase. It's precisely because non-fans bought them that they are unavailable to fans.
    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward
      Is there a system where you need to provide ID that you bought the tickets?

      Something like;
      Paul Johnsmith buys 5 tickets, states he's the leader so all 5 of the tickets have "Johnsmith group".
      At entry presenting "Johnsmith Group" tickets, the father, Paul Johnsmith proves he's the group leader and they let him in.

      Paul buys 5 tickets, states he's the only person so the ticket has "Paul".
      At entry presenting "Paul" ticket, the father, Paul proves he's the owner.

      Then the ticket sellers could introduce a new serv
      • by walt-sjc (145127)
        Have you ever been to any kind of sporting event with tickets? Clearly not. Your idea is completely unworkable. Many tickets are sold by people with extras right at the event. People in groups may also not all go in at the same time.

        The fact is that it's PERFECTLY FINE to give your tickets to someone else, or to sell them. You just can't sell them for more than face value plus 2 dollars or whatever.
        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by kiatoa (66945)
          What baffles me is the same people who are so religious about the magic of the free market get so indignant when tickets get marked up 1000% by a scalper. Either embrace the free market and accept the associated consequences or accept the fact that the free market doesn't always yield the most optimal solution to all social and economic problems. Tickets (to sporting events) and oil need the same treatment in my opinion. Tax away the *unearned* profits. I.e. pay the bills, give the investors a reasonable ch
    • Re:To be fair... (Score:4, Insightful)

      by Peter Cooper (660482) * on Saturday October 20, 2007 @02:20AM (#21053179) Homepage Journal
      so why should anyone have sympathy for organizations/individuals trying to profit from charity to society?

      Charity? I don't think sports teams are being "charitable" per-se for selling tickets at under market rate.. they do it to enforce their brand and keep up the excitement in customers who can't get tickets due to overdemand and who will then try to fight for them next time.

      They should just sell the damn things for market rate. I don't see beachside condos or Mercedes Benz cars being sold at under market simply to keep the proles happy.
      • Re:To be fair... (Score:5, Insightful)

        by wizbit (122290) on Saturday October 20, 2007 @02:33AM (#21053237)
        And I don't see any car dealerships selling Maybach jerseys. There's a bigger market than just tickets, and it's overwhelmingly driven by the middle class. Make it impossible for blue collar fans to attend a game and you drive down merchandising opportunities elsewhere. The NFL already has what's mostly become an exclusively white collar event - it's called the Super Bowl.
        • by Dahamma (304068)
          And I don't see any car dealerships selling Maybach jerseys

          Hmm, how many 14 year old boys (or even 30 year old men!) have Porsche or Ferrari posters on their walls, their screensavers, etc? How many of them will ever buy one?

          I almost started going off about how the NFL has been way beyond "blue collar fans" for decades (I guarantee 95% of the hardcore football fans glued to their TVs on Sunday have not attended an NFL game in years, if ever). And about how there are no more tickets available for them if t
    • Football clubs don't set their tickets at market prices because they need to protect their long term interests and markets. Current top teams could raise their prices and still sell out making short term gains, but those guy would be gone quicky enough when the success stops coming. Short term fans also don't buy the shirts and the merchandise.

      Clubs need to protect their real supporters, who are there for life, whose kids will support them and will be there through thick and thin. These people can't ne

      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        by oldelpaso (851825)
        Bingo. Steep price rises might sound like a good way to make money when every game is a sellout, but sports fans have long memories, and should the team's on-field performance fall on hard times those alienated would not return. Plus, ticket sales are only one part of revenue, merchandising and things like refreshments account for a significant proportion. I don't know if its the same in the US, but for the largest European football (soccer) clubs, gate money is a distant third behind TV and commercial reve
      • Re:To be fair... (Score:5, Informative)

        by walt-sjc (145127) on Saturday October 20, 2007 @06:46AM (#21054129)
        It's against the law in Mass. to resell a ticket for more than face value plus a small fee (which is like $2 or something...) That's why they were able to go after stubhub.
    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by J-1000 (869558)
      The price set by the venues IS the fair market price. They are the ones who do the market research, they are the ones with the customer relationship to maintain, and thus they set their ticket prices accordingly. When outside middlemen force their way into the equation it undermines not only the customer's best interests, but also the venues' as well.
    • The tickets *are* set at market prices. There is a select group of people who are willing to pay extreme prices for a regular season football game, and if they increased the price of tickets to what they went for on StubHub (many of those tickets never sell, BTW) they probably wouldn't sell out the event. There is a fine line between "more people want tickets than we have seats", and "we only sold half the venue". That makes a market for scalping a small percentage of the overall number of tickets.

      Don't thi
  • by andy314159pi (787550) on Saturday October 20, 2007 @01:19AM (#21052883) Journal
    I would really only want to hide my name if I'd bought season tickets for the Dolphins.
  • by Cryophallion (1129715) on Saturday October 20, 2007 @01:20AM (#21052889)
    The issue is the fact that they are selling the tickets above the face value.

    If I remember correctly, here in MA is is completely legal to resell tickets - just not for profit.

    Our local sports teams have more than just a few insanely loyal fans who will do just about anything to see a game. People try to take advantage of this, which results in prices nearing mortage levels (and at 300k for a 2 bed home in the suburbs here, that it quite a bit of money).

    I'm all for people being enterprising and making a little money - say 10% or at most 20% above face value. But anything over that is taking advantage of the fans, and preying on their obsessive love of the sports they love.
    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward
      Law says you can sell at face value + 10% max (not sure if your trading expences like postage are included)
    • by SnowZero (92219) on Saturday October 20, 2007 @02:34AM (#21053243)

      If I remember correctly, here in MA is is completely legal to resell tickets - just not for profit.
      If that's true, then law enforcement should be getting the list of names, not an NFL team. Are the Patriots now a law enforcement agency? Also, why do they need the list of people buying tickets?

      I think scalping sucks too, but you really can't fight the market and pretend there isn't scarcity.
      • If that's true, then law enforcement should be getting the list of names, not an NFL team. Are the Patriots now a law enforcement agency? Also, why do they need the list of people *buying* tickets?
        Bingo. Mod this man up.
      • by pipingguy (566974) *
        Have ticket prices been artificially pushed up due to team/venue owners pandering to corporate clients that can easily pay triple the price that a typical fan can afford and advertise their company "for free" and buy blocks of seats and boxes just to offer prime seats for visiting executives/clients or favoured friends?

        Probably not.
      • If that's true, then law enforcement should be getting the list of names, not an NFL team. Are the Patriots now a law enforcement agency? Also, why do they need the list of people buying tickets?

        If the ticket is listed as non-transferable (you can buy ten, but only if you plan on going with nine of your friends... or you can buy them, and do what you want, but you can't re-sell them for a profit), then isn't it a contract issue and not so much a criminal law issue?

        (Unless, of course, your state has speci

    • by Lord Kano (13027) on Saturday October 20, 2007 @03:00AM (#21053351) Homepage Journal
      The issue is the fact that they are selling the tickets above the face value.

      Why in the fuck else would people create a marketplace for the buying and selling of tickets if not to make profit on it?

      I'm all for people being enterprising and making a little money - say 10% or at most 20% above face value. But anything over that is taking advantage of the fans, and preying on their obsessive love of the sports they love.

      The same can be said for coin or comic book dealers. Does it matter that Action Comics #1 originally cost $0.10? If some dork is willing to pay $250,000 for it now, there's nothing wrong with selling it at that price.

      What teams make in endorsements, broadcast rights and merchandising is so substantial that they're already taking advantage of the fans by charging $50.00 or whatever per ticket.

      It's pure economics, when there is great demand for a product that is in limited supply, prices will rise. There were jackasses who paid $2,500 for Playstation 3 consoles because that was the only way they could get them. Should Sony have been able to sue to prevent people from reselling things that they legitimately bought? Why is that any worse than selling tickets at higher prices? What would be wrong with having an auction? If two people want the same ticket and are willing to bid against each other to buy them, why should the owner of the ticket be kept from allowing them to do so?

      LK

      • by pipingguy (566974) *
        But with sports events, the true local fans are getting shut out of the event because big money is inflating the cost of going to the game. Once any team loses its local fanbase the game is over (so to speak).
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by LordLucless (582312)
      I'm all for people being enterprising and making a little money - say 10% or at most 20% above face value. But anything over that is taking advantage of the fans, and preying on their obsessive love of the sports they love.

      That's right. But why stop there? Why shouldn't the government force, say, Apple to sell their products for no more than 10-20% markup - after all, anything more than that is taking advantage of Apple fanboys, and trendies who just have to have the latest chic tech. And excessive marku
      • by mmkkbb (816035)
        That's right. But why stop there?

        Because tickets are a funny resource in that more of them can't be issued. Anti-scalping laws, combined with per-order limits on the number of tickets you can buy, are there to prevent ticket scalpers from buying up as many tickets as possible and artificially restricting the supply of available tickets in order to make a profit. This is similar to the alleged practice of NYC slumlords leaving entire buildings empty in order to drive rents up by restricting supply.
        • by LordLucless (582312) on Saturday October 20, 2007 @09:12AM (#21054719)
          It's just the same as any other limited resource - it's just that that particular resource is limited enough that people can get a near-monopoly without significant investment. But in the end, its just the same as anything else - in fact, its the same thing we saw with the Playstation 3 earlier - limited supply, people grab up plenty, then flog em on eBay.

          I don't really have any problem with pre-order limits, or conditions on tickets that invalidate them if they're not held by the purchaser, or any other sort of controls imposed by the retailer, within their authority. It's additional government controls that I don't particularly like.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by clarkkent09 (1104833)
      I'm all for people being enterprising and making a little money - say 10% or at most 20% above face value. But anything over that is taking advantage of the fans, and preying on their obsessive love of the sports they love.

      Sorry about the rant, but comments like this (and people who mod them up) drive me up the wall! Its amazing how many people simply don't this whole liberty business. Who exactly are you to decide how much profit someone else should make or not make? Should every business be restricted
      • by zotz (3951)
        "Sorry about the rant, but comments like this (and people who mod them up) drive me up the wall! Its amazing how many people simply don't this whole liberty business."

        I like the liberty business just fine, but I often find calls for government intervention come in areas where the free market is already distorted.

        Does the NFL get and "special" treatments? Lots of other businesses in our supposedly free market seem to.

        all the best,

        drew

        http://openphoto.net/gallery/index.html?user_id=178 [openphoto.net]
      • What kind of fascist are you to tell sports teams which conditions they can put on the tickets they sell?

        If you don't want to adhere to the conditions on the ticket, then don't buy it. But don't pretend that this is a liberty issue. It isn't. If you buy sports tickets then you agree to all sorts of things that are usually written on the ticket. Sometimes this includes a prohibition on resale.

        Sports teams have their own reasons for pricing their tickets as they do and for wanting to prevent resales. Why shou
        • What kind of fascist are you to tell sports teams which conditions they can put on the tickets they sell?

          If you don't want to adhere to the conditions on the ticket, then don't buy it. But don't pretend that this is a liberty issue. It isn't. If you buy sports tickets then you agree to all sorts of things that are usually written on the ticket. Sometimes this includes a prohibition on resale.

          Sports teams have their own reasons for pricing their tickets as they do and for wanting to prevent resales. Why should you be able to tell them how much to sell their good for and under what conditions it ought to be sold?

          The OP was commenting on MA law and a previous poster who seems to be saying that the law should not allow people to resell tickets for whatever the market will bear. At the end of his post, he explicitly states that he is fine with the team attaching whatever conditions they want to the sale of the tickets.

    • by Arthur Grumbine (1086397) on Saturday October 20, 2007 @04:31AM (#21053713) Journal
      $300,000 for a 2-bedroom home, you should be so lucky...

      When I was young we had to pay $650,000 for 3 walls and a tarp for a roof, and we didn't even have a pro football team...

      Oh wait...that's not when I was young. That's right now. Fucking Orange County.
    • by Dredd13 (14750)
      But if I bought those tickets in, say, New York (because Ticketmaster doesn't limit sales to MA residents), I can sell them for, legally, "whateverthefuckIwant".

      The Patriots are assuming that "their laws" apply everywhere, which certainly isn't the case at all.
    • Registered fans could buy non-resellable ticket.
  • Ironic? (Score:5, Funny)

    by dotslashdot (694478) on Saturday October 20, 2007 @01:30AM (#21052939)
    Isn't it ironic that the team allegedly invading privacy is called the Patriots?
    • Re:Ironic? (Score:5, Funny)

      by shoemilk (1008173) on Saturday October 20, 2007 @01:35AM (#21052953) Journal
      Not after the PARTIOT Act...
    • Isn't it ironic that the team allegedly invading privacy is called the Patriots?

      What privacy? These people gave their info to an online retailer, of course it is going to be shared with 3rd parties. The only thing different in this case is that the retailer is not getting paid to share the info.
    • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

      by Anonymous Coward
      Nope, not at all. Then again, I remember that they are, after all, the team that was caught spying on other teams [go.com]. (Apparently the penalty for cheating in major league sports is to pay a fine and nothing else. You'd think they'd get kicked out of the league, but apparently not.)

      I guess they thought the warrantless wiretapping privileges granted via the USA PATRIOT Act applied to them as the Patriots...
    • by Chapter80 (926879)
      You're looking at it all wrong. This is total consistency.

      The original 18th century New England Patriots were considered criminals. They broke all sorts of laws, including tax evasion and treason!
      The PATRIOT act continued that trend. And now there's NFL Camera cheating and privacy invasion.

      That's not irony.

      Irony is the condition my Tom Brady jersey is in - it was wrinkly after last week's game, though.

  • Read it and weep (Score:3, Informative)

    by davmoo (63521) on Saturday October 20, 2007 @01:31AM (#21052945)
    the court order to turn over the names infringes on the privacy rights of Patriots fans

    Too effing bad. Every sports related season ticket by any team in any sport always has rules attached. And if one of those rules is season ticket holders can't resell their tickets, then the franchise has every right to find out who is reselling and cut them off. If you don't like their rules, then don't buy their tickets. That's your only option.
    • While I agree with you in principle, there's more to it than that.

      The venue has every right to revoke these tickets. However, what's at issue is whether or not StubHub has any obligation to tell the venue which tickets are being sold. If they're not based in Massachusetts, the fact that what they're doing violates Massachusetts law is entirely irrelevant. Unless there's a federal law (or state law in the state they do operate in), they have every right to tell the venue to figure it out on their own.

      If a st
      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by tm2b (42473)
        Uh, no. You're subject to the laws of a state if you do business in it - it should take little thought to see why this is necessary.

        The question isn't whether they're based in Massachusetts, it's whether they're doing business in Massachusetts. And they are.
        • How so? (Score:3, Insightful)

          by Rix (54095)
          Are their offices in Massachusetts? Do they have any presence in Massachusetts?

          If China bans baseball, should patriots.com be required to hand over a list of Chinese IPs which visited the site?
          • by walt-sjc (145127)
            They are selling to people in MA for events in MA. CLEARLY they are doing business in MA - it doesn't matter where their offices are.
  • This is an interesting case, but scalping laws vary by state, so it should pretty much only apply to MA. In Cali, it's only illegal to resale if you do it on event premises (CA Penal Code 346) without permission. It may be less stringent than that (I seem to recall it needing to be on the day of the event for over face value to qualify, but I'm not sure and IANAL). Personally I hate professional scalpers, but at the same time I don't have a problem with some fan selling their seat (even for above face) i
  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday October 20, 2007 @01:37AM (#21052965)
    FTFA

    Team rules bar reselling game tickets for a profit. State law, though rarely enforced, restricts ticket markups to $2 above face value plus some service charges. Patriots tickets have been offered on StubHub at prices many times higher, including two 50-yard-line seats for New England's Dec. 16 game against the AFC rival New York Jets listed Thursday for $1,300.05 each. Their face value is $125.

    StubHub, one of the largest online ticket sellers, argued that the Patriots' request violated its confidentiality agreement with its customers and said the team wants to create a monopoly on the resale market for its own tickets.
    under state law tickets can be resold just at a very low profit though "the team rules" forbid any resale. that is anti-competitive though hording tickets and selling them at 10x what they are worth isn't any better. don't feel sorry for either side, neither is correct- both are screwing people over.
    • by definition tickets are worth what willing buyers will pay.

      Seems to me the tickets are under-priced from the get-go.

      There wouldn't be a problem if sports teams, concert venues, etc. just charged scalper like fees to begin with, then discounted the unsold tickets closer to the event time, if needed.

      That gives all the profit to the right people, not artificial middle-men (scalpers).

  • well, as far as the whole season ticket issue goes, i wonder if part of getting the tickets is that you sign a contract with the team about what you can and can not do with those tickets. And if one of the things you can not do is resell them for a profit over the legal state limit, there might be some very worried season ticket holders out there right now. As a contrast to this, the philadelphia phillies use stubhub as their official 'reseller' and even sent out links to stubhub's website in some of thei
  • by iminplaya (723125) <iminplaya.gmail@com> on Saturday October 20, 2007 @01:43AM (#21052999) Journal
    We need the Department of Gameland Security. If you want a ticket, you must ask permission 72 hours in advance. Upon entering the stadium, you must show your passport or a government approved ID. Under the state's secrets act, you are prohibited from discussing the events. Woe to you who cheers for the wrong team. You will be placed on the "no seat list". See, this is why the airlines really want ID...to prevent you from selling your ticket. Don't be surprised to see it here also "for your protection".
  • by eln (21727) on Saturday October 20, 2007 @02:00AM (#21053093) Homepage
    This story is an interesting counterpoint to the news that Major League Baseball has agreed [usatoday.com] to endorse StubHub as their official ticket reseller.

    Personally, I'm torn on this issue. Basically, as a person on a fairly standard middle class income, it sucks that I'll likely never be able to attend major sporting events because scalpers quickly scoop up all of the tickets and price them out of range of the normal fan. On the other hand, if teams insist on building stadiums that don't hold the number of fans that would actually be willing to go to the games (for example, Invesco Field in Denver was built to almost exactly the same capacity as the old Mile High Stadium, even though waiting lists for season tickets there are decades long), it might make sense to let the free market determine the price of seats.

    Personally, I think that scalping should be illegal, as scalpers essentially make their money by employing dirty tricks to corner the market on tickets, thereby possibly artificially inflating the cost of tickets. I understand the free market argument, but I think measures should be taken so we can be sure that fans at a game represent a true cross section of the fan base for the team, not just the ones that can afford $500 or more for tickets.
    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by Lord Kano (13027)
      I'll likely never be able to attend major sporting events because scalpers quickly scoop up all of the tickets and price them out of range of the normal fan.

      What's stopping you from going to the place that the scalpers go and getting a ticket for yourself?

      LK
    • ", thereby possibly artificially inflating the cost of tickets."

      If people are willing to pay $10,000 for a ticket, then by definition, that's the value of the ticket. That's not an artificial inflated value, that's the actual value.

      It doesn't seem immoral, I don't see that it should be illegal.

      If a ticket scalper scooped up every patriot ticket and was selling them for $10,000 per ticket and they sold them all, god bless them for being clever entrepreneurs. If they scooped up every ticket and couldn't se
      • by Chmcginn (201645) *

        If people are willing to pay $10,000 for a ticket, then by definition, that's the value of the ticket. That's not an artificial inflated value, that's the actual value.

        If the club wants to sell their tickets below market price, it's totally within their rights to do so. If they want to prevent resale of a ticket (which isn't a physical good so much as rent on a very tiny piece of real estate for a very short period of time), it's totally within their rights to do so.

        If the patriots are angry about this, t

        • Here's a somewhat tongue in cheek suggestion then...

          Charge a large amount for the ticket. Make the assumption the team is going to win every game and win the superbowl.

          For every game the team loses, they refund part or all of the admission to the original owner. If they don't make the playoffs there is an amount refunded, if the team wins everything, the club keeps all the money. If the club loses all the games, they refund all the money.

          In fact, maybe the NFL should mandate that approach, because it fo
    • by Ichijo (607641)

      Some transportation companies like Skybus and Megabus have come up with an answer [chron.com] to the high price of tickets: sell the first few at a very low price, and sell the rest at incrementally higher prices. Then even the poor can buy tickets, if they get in line early enough.

    • by barzok (26681)
      Define "major sporting events."

      Football game tickets have always been hard to come by because there are so few games in a season. Yes, that one sucks. I wanted to get tickets for my brother, father & I for the Bills/Giants this December but the best non-StubHub seats I could find (via TicketMaster or Bills.com) were over $50 each and horrible seats.

      But you can usually get regular-season baseball tickets for under $30. I went to an NLCS game in 2006 at Shea Stadium and IIRC the seats were only $45 each -
  • "Scalping" should be legal. I bought a ticket, I should be able to do as I wish with it. Neither the government nor the venue should be able to stop me.
    • "being a douche" should be legal. i am a douche, i should be able to commit as much douchery as i wish. neither the government nor the bag should be able to stop me.
      • by pla (258480)
        "being a douche" should be legal. i am a douche, i should be able to commit as much douchery as i wish. neither the government nor the bag should be able to stop me.

        Wow, great comeback. And so apropos - You do have the right to act like a douche, as illustrated by your responding to a blunt yet insigntful comment with the above drivel.

        With so many Slashdotters self-proclaimed Libertarians, it amazes me that people have a problem with scalping. The "manufacturer" (the team/stadium/league) has foolishl
  • GO CHARGERS!

    *ducks*
    • Dude, this is Slashdot. What are you ducking for?

      Oh, Chargers, I see. Your ducking to avoid the hail of used batteries from you hated rivals, the Disposables! Carry on then...
  • I kind of imagined that buying a season ticket entitled the buyer to something more than a privilege to attend games. I suppose they could give a prorated refund for unused tickets, but I doubt they would get very far "revoking" the ticket. I guess it's not a bad as "Hannah Montana" tickets, that the promoters seem to scalping themselves.
  • Wait, you mean it's still a crime when it's Web 2.0.

    No 2.0 way!!!
  • The people who tried (but didn't succeed) to buy tickets have undoubtedly had their privacy violated. Those names should have been excluded, since they've not completed any transactions with the team. I don't see what business the Patriots have with their names.
  • Do they not believe in freedom of exchange of goods? Pure capatalist economics. Supply and demand.

    Oh wait, this is Soviet America wher capitalism only is good if you are a big company.

    Next you will see that Microsoft demands the name andress and phonenumber from each person who has ever downloaded a Linux distribution.

    Also how much of a fight have they put up? "Give us the names." "Only if we have an order" "Here it is." is something different then "Give us the names" "You can have those names if you pry th
  • Mixed Feelings (Score:3, Interesting)

    by DavidD_CA (750156) on Saturday October 20, 2007 @03:21AM (#21053461) Homepage
    I'm not 100% sure where I stand on issues like this.

    A part of me gets sick when I go on eBay and find tickets for a concert or sporting event that is up for sale by a "professional" scalper. Especially annoying are when these tickets were obtained from a fan club membership, or sold out within minutes only to appear right on eBay. It makes it more expensive for a real fan to get decent seats.

    Then the other part of me is a capitalist pig and says there's nothing wrong with that.

    As for selling these season tickets... I don't see what the big deal is. People have done that for years, only now it's easier. They've also bought season tickets for the purpose of giving to clients (or prospects).
    • by ari_j (90255)
      Here's what pisses me off, as a capitalist pig. If there is such a market for vastly overpriced, scalped tickets, then the solution is to increase the original sale price. Demand far exceeds supply at the original sale price point, and that's why scalpers are able to make huge profits. If the original price were higher, then the scalpers would fall out of the picture and, while some fans would pay more for a ticket, many would pay much less.
  • by flyingfsck (986395) on Saturday October 20, 2007 @03:21AM (#21053463)
    The fact is that the scalpers legally bought the tickets, so why may they not resell them? The only issue should be if they don't declare the income for tax purposes.
    • by Kwirl (877607)
      Yes, they legally bought the tickets. They also agreed to abide by the rules and conditions that went along with ownership of that ticket. I realize that most comments here are of the 'how dare anyone try to tell me to abide by rules or agreements' attitude, but that still does not mean that there are some of us who believe that our word and signature should have some value. When I agree to a commitment, then upholding my end of that agreement should be a given.

      When the season ticket was purchased, the b
  • This is BS (Score:2, Redundant)

    by nurb432 (527695)
    Its my ticket, i should be able to sell it if i want. Or just rip it to shreads.

    The ball team got their money, i paid for it. Screw em.
    • Absolutely.
      "The consumer is sovereign."

      It seems our current government, and many of our people, have forgotten that this whole experiment in Democracy called the USA was designed to give Live, Liberty and Happiness to the people. There isn't anything in their about the RIGHTs of corporations, or even of such a thing called a "multinational." You make a product and you sell it -- once you sell it, you no longer have any control over that thing you sold -- none.

      The loophole has been to "lease" the seat -- not
  • per (Score:2, Interesting)

    by kurtis25 (909650)
    I'm sure like all tickets this come with strings attached. But this issue is about two questions, can the Patriots force a company to turn over lists of sellers, what privacy issue does this have, what is included in the list, do they know how much I sold my ticket for? Is this concept of restrictions on sales fair? Can I buy a ticket and be told what to do with it (can MSFT sell me an XBox then prevent me from modding it?) In Ohio folks sell pencils with free tickets to the Michigan Ohio State game. Since
  • That they're not getting in on the extreme markup action themselves. I'm surprised they didn't get the addresses too and case the homes of the people on the list and film them, to use in a later ga...court case.
  • Minnesota repealed a decades-long scalping prohibition just this August with the image that it would only legalize the people hawking tickets outside the stadium who have always been there and always will be there. But it has become clear that the ticket reselling companies are the ones that benefit grabbing everything up the moment an online sale starts.
     

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