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Leaked RIAA Training Video 335

Posted by samzenpus
from the gateway-crime dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Gizmodo has a clip of that RIAA training video produced with the NDAA for US prosecutors that was leaked to torrent sites a few days ago. It argues they should pursue piracy cases because it leads to bigger and badder wares, like handguns, drugs, terrorist orgs, and hardcore repeat offender criminals. It's kind of sad how far they're stretching to bring law enforcement into the matter."
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Leaked RIAA Training Video

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  • by themushroom (197365) on Wednesday February 20, 2008 @09:12PM (#22497572) Homepage
    Because, you know, terrorists always watch pirated movies and download pop albums, and they're constantly Torrenting weapons of mass destruction (though it takes awhile with their throughput).

    RIAA, Homeland Security... who knew they were one and the same?
    • by Jarik_Tentsu (1065748) on Wednesday February 20, 2008 @10:49PM (#22498332)
      In future news...

      George W. Bush: We have EVIDENCE that Sweden is hosting the servers of mass destruction owned by the notorious terrorist organisation, The Pirate Bay! Sweden is refusing to shutdown this evil group, so we must invade them to maintain peace in the world!

      Random Person: But Mr. President...what does file-sharing have to do with terrorism?

      George W. Bush: You must have missed that informative video presented by our friends, the RIAA linking file-sharing to terrorism. These 'torrents' can cause mass destruction and have already resulted in billions of dollars of damage to our economy and this is the beginning to them...torture, rape and murder is what is to come! We must liberate the internet from the tyranny and dictatorship of these file-sharers!

      *Post-War with Sweden*

      George W. Bush: I don't understand! We flattened every single server cluster in the country and Pirate Bay is up again...!

      CIA: It seems they have multiple mirrors across the globe.

      George W. Bush: They're all terrorist supporters! NUKE THEM ALL!

      ~Jarik
      • by superash (1045796) on Wednesday February 20, 2008 @11:45PM (#22498730)
        Pirate Bay's reply to George W. Bush - "Arrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr"
      • Sweden's neutral! (Score:3, Insightful)

        by volpe (58112)
        I can see Bush figuring that attacking Sweden would be a piece of cake, seeing as how they're a neutral country with no army [nytimes.com].
        • Re:Sweden's neutral! (Score:5, Informative)

          by Foobar of Borg (690622) on Thursday February 21, 2008 @12:42AM (#22499124)

          I can see Bush figuring that attacking Sweden would be a piece of cake, seeing as how they're a neutral country with no army.
          Well, like most other countries, if anyone tries to actually invade Sweden, they would be met with a lot of resistance. You don't need a standing army to get people mobilized in a hurry. Sweden was able to stay out of the first world war and keep an "armed neutrality" during the second world war. There is a short but descriptive video of Sweden during the second world war here [google.com]. Only the title is in Swedish. The audio is English.
          • by Cassius Corodes (1084513) on Thursday February 21, 2008 @02:10AM (#22499590)
            While that might be true, it takes a while to build up an army, with a professional and experienced core to serve as the officers. You can expand an army to be 10 times the size fairly quickly but you need some core to start from and that can take up a generation to succeed. You need to train the pilots, design and acquire hardware all of which takes time in modern warfare.

            As an aside, Sweden stayed out of the first and second war by NOT being important either strategically or resource-wise, rather than some kind of political strategy (they pissed off Hitler plenty but there was really no need to do anything about it). Belgium (in both world wars) and Netherlands + Denmark + Luxembourg + Norway (in second world war) were officially neutral yet got wiped because of strategic and resource reasons.
            • Re:Sweden's neutral! (Score:5, Informative)

              by Paolone (939023) on Thursday February 21, 2008 @03:56AM (#22499990)

              Sweden stayed out of the first and second war by NOT being important either strategically or resource-wise
              Except for the enormous amount of iron ore mined out shipped out to Germany and Britain, of course: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swedish_iron_ore_during_World_War_II [wikipedia.org]
            • by stupidflanders (1230894) on Thursday February 21, 2008 @05:55AM (#22500488)
              The Viet Cong [wikipedia.org] held off pretty darn well without the tools of "modern warfare" in 'Nam. Guerilla warfare [wikipedia.org] is amazingly effective in some situations. Even George Washington [washingtonpost.com] used it in the American Revolutionary War [wikipedia.org]:

              ...he came to understand that what we now know as guerrilla warfare was the only way to fight in the American wild, and he mastered it


              I can see it now: Sweede/geeks hiding behind server clusters, plotting raids on Rockstar caches, wearing down the morale of the enemy by constantly playing Hamster Dance.
            • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

              by microbox (704317)
              While that might be true, it takes a while to build up an army, with a professional and experienced core to serve as the officers. You can expand an army to be 10 times the size fairly quickly but you need some core to start from and that can take up a generation to succeed. You need to train the pilots, design and acquire hardware all of which takes time in modern warfare

              IAAACG (I am an arm chair general), but, AFAIK, Sweden has a very large and well trained reserve comprising of pretty much every able-
            • Re:Sweden's neutral! (Score:4, Interesting)

              by Ox0065 (1085977) on Thursday February 21, 2008 @10:45AM (#22503006) Journal
              so...

              compulsory military service (or alternatively community service) exists in Sweden. (^-^) Didn't you know?

              ...also, as I understood it, Sweden & Finland were instrumental in disabling Germany's hard water (read nuclear bomb) plant for long enough for the USA to steal all the technology / scientists they needed to whip up a couple first. 12 Scandinavian commandos bombed a factory guarded by 500 SS soldiers in the middle of German occupied Norway TWICE with no casualties. They went to ground in the countryside after the first attack. There had been an earlier British attempt of which there were no survivors.

              http://www.espionageinfo.com/Gu-In/Heavy-Water-Technology.html [espionageinfo.com]
          • by Anzya (464805) on Thursday February 21, 2008 @04:34AM (#22500162)
            Actually, Swedens official strategy for an invasion is to only hold out long enough to allow all our milita to run into the woods and get armed. After that: guerilla/terrorist warfare for all :)

            A tactic I belive USA in Iraq called unfair ;)
          • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

            by DataBroker (964208)

            Sweden was able to stay out of the first world war and keep an "armed neutrality" during the second world war.

            I went to Denmark, and was told all about Sweden's "armed neutrality". I was told that the only reason that Sweden was allowed to remain neutral was because it succumbed to Germany's will. It essentially agreed to work full-time supplying war materials (iron ore) if Germany agreed not to destroy it. For more, check out this link. [wikipedia.org]

            Minor disclaimer: I'm relaying info a Dane gave me on the Swedes

        • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

          by me at werk (836328)

          I can see Bush figuring that attacking Sweden would be a piece of cake, seeing as how they're a neutral country with no army [nytimes.com].
          Tell my wife I said... Hello.
        • Re:Sweden's neutral! (Score:5, Informative)

          by arivanov (12034) on Thursday February 21, 2008 @02:58AM (#22499792) Homepage
          No army?

          Bwahahaha... They do not just have their own army, they are also one of the biggest manufacturers of weapons in the world. Ever heard of Bofors? Swedes make their own small arms, artillery, tanks, even fighter aircraft.

          All of that considerably cheaper than USA or UK and a lot of that much better quality than the USA or UK. They buy some avionics from BAE, but otherwise their weapons industry is mostly native. In fact, IIRC, USA is importing some small arms from Sweden for their special forces. So does UK.

          While the Viggens and Griphens do not look so fancy they can actually stand their own against most NATO or Russian aircraft. Same for other Swedish kit.

          This is one "neutral" country I will definitely not f*** with. It is neutrality armed to the teeth.
    • by cgenman (325138) on Wednesday February 20, 2008 @11:18PM (#22498532) Homepage
      It's true, isn't it? Your average terrorist is probably out there pirating software, cheating on their spouses, and experimenting with illegal narcotics.

      Of course, terrorists also eat, go to the bathroom, and occasionally bathe too. That's because it's what people do. Correlation does not equal causality, unless you're very well paid to believe so.

    • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday February 20, 2008 @11:50PM (#22498776)
      Well it's obvious you haven't got a fucking clue what you're talking about because the video is NOT talking about downloads, it's talking about ACTUAL piracy. That is, counterfeiting. Copying something and then selling it for a profit. And you know what? I'm dead set against that. I support the police and the MPAA/RIAA in their crusade to stamp out counterfeiting, because that really DOES harm the producer as well as the consumer. I only wish they'd spend half the effort stamping that out as they have trying to convince people that copying DVDs and CDs is wrong.
      • by KDR_11k (778916) on Thursday February 21, 2008 @01:38AM (#22499390)
        I thought when you said actual piracy you meant boarding freighters, killing the crew and taking their valuables. I can see how that might lead to more violent crimes.
        • by Fred_A (10934) <fred@freIIIdshome.org minus threevowels> on Thursday February 21, 2008 @03:30AM (#22499908) Homepage

          I thought when you said actual piracy you meant boarding freighters, killing the crew and taking their valuables. I can see how that might lead to more violent crimes.
          I can't.

          But then I can't really find a "more violent crime", especially since I know a number of people who have been captains or senior officers on large long haul freighters that have seen piracy up close. Even cruise ships and private small crafts such as sailboats aren't immune either in some areas.

          Piracy can get very very nasty despite the romantic image it currently carries.
    • by Serengeti (48438) on Thursday February 21, 2008 @12:04AM (#22498876)
      Hate to ruin the fun here... seriously I love all of you... but no where in the video were they suggesting that piracy and terrorism, murder or drugs are related.

      All that was suggested was that if officers wanted into a suspects home, but did not have enough evidence to issue a warrant on the suspected charges alone, they could use piracy as a means to get that warrant. The intent, which should be obvious by now, is to get into the house so that evidence of terrorism, drug trafficking or violent intent involving firearms might then be 'coincidentally' discovered.

      And hey... sounds like it's a great strategy. How many people do you know that haven't pirated anything at all? The police just found themselves a skeleton key.
      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by imemyself (757318)
        Interesting, and IANAL, but it seems like that wouldn't necessarily work real well. If mean, if you get a warrant for someone "pirating" music, the only things that they can really look at/take would be the computers, maybe some CD's, etc, right? I was under the impression, that (as some example I read put it), the police could not get a warrant to search a home for a stolen piano, and then arrest the owner because they found drugs in a cabinet, because they could not have reasonably expected to find the
        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          In theory they can't, but in practice they could easily come up with an excuse, and after they found something its too late.
      • by mitchellfx (411302) on Thursday February 21, 2008 @04:57AM (#22500248)
        Here's a quote from the video. According to a prosecutor from the RIAA:

        "I think number one it has to be stressed that this crime, this type of crime effects quality of life in the DA's, uh, jurisdiction in the cities in which they work and live, but the other thing is that it's a link to a lot of other crimes. And I tell the prosecutors and I tell the police officers that I work with all the time use this type of a crime as a tool this might lead you to a drug investigation...It also has links to terrorism organizations for you federal prosecutors out there..."

        You can find this about 2 minutes into the video.
      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by gstoddart (321705)

        All that was suggested was that if officers wanted into a suspects home, but did not have enough evidence to issue a warrant on the suspected charges alone, they could use piracy as a means to get that warrant. The intent, which should be obvious by now, is to get into the house so that evidence of terrorism, drug trafficking or violent intent involving firearms might then be 'coincidentally' discovered.

        That is a very terrifying concept. Will the RIAA fake some evidence to suggest that someone at that addr

    • Going after piracy cases leads to terrorist organizations-- you know, organizations which terrorize people.

      What they mean is that going after piracy helps bolster one of these organizations, known as the RIAA.....
    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      So Comcast aren't limiting their "unlimited" broadband service - they are fighting terrorism
  • by Ariastis (797888) on Wednesday February 20, 2008 @09:12PM (#22497576)

    A CD today, tomorrow the world! arrrrrrrrrrr....
  • How? (Score:5, Funny)

    by TubeSteak (669689) on Wednesday February 20, 2008 @09:13PM (#22497584) Journal
    How will they pursue piracy cases without a Navy?
  • by Will the Chill (78436) on Wednesday February 20, 2008 @09:13PM (#22497586) Homepage
    This is just the same old "gateway crime" argument, which, if history is any example, will inevitably be scientifically proven false by statistical studies showing (perhaps a correlation, but) no causation.

    All agressive prosecutors (persecutors?) will fall back on this precept when it starts to become clear the "crime" they're fighting against is victimless and thus shouldn't be considered a crime at all.

    I find this is mostly caused by greed and ignorance on the part of the persecuting party and any agencies they employ in their unethical battle.

    -WtC

    *error 404: sig not found*
    • by DracusMage (825973) on Wednesday February 20, 2008 @09:33PM (#22497754)

      'Cause you start out stealing songs and then you're robbing liquor stores
      And sellin' crack and runnin' over school kids with your car

      I never thought that a Weird Al song would actually be a part of the RIAA's groundwork for getting the government to do their bidding. But if the RIAA says that downloading songs is going to lead to running guns and drugs, then we should take this a step further.

      In order to better "think of the children" we should immediately disband the RIAA and all of the record companies. I mean, if stealing songs leads to drugs being sold to children, or guns being fired at people, we should do the "right thing" and keep anyone from stealing music. Since they can't do this the way they are going at it, then obviously we should stop the music piracy by stopping the music.
      • by tubapro12 (896596) <ubelkatze2004 AT gmail DOT com> on Wednesday February 20, 2008 @10:53PM (#22498360) Journal
        Interesting idea, but the way I see it, if they're going to argue that piracy is a gateway crime, how can they not argue that music makes people violent [nytimes.com]? I have to offset this with the fact that they are the RIAA, nevertheless, combining these two opinions seems roughly logically consistent to me.
      • by dbIII (701233) on Wednesday February 20, 2008 @11:59PM (#22498834)

        we should stop the music piracy by stopping the music

        You can't stop the music. Nobody can stop the music. Take the cold from snow. Tell the trees, don't grow. Tell the wind, don't blow, 'cause it's easier.

    • by IdleTime (561841) on Wednesday February 20, 2008 @09:48PM (#22497878) Journal
      USA should follow Norways example on how to deal with RIAA, MPAA and other such extortion outfits.
      http://torrentfreak.com/norwegian-police-deal-massive-blow-to-mpaa-lawyer-080220/ [torrentfreak.com]

      "Like many lawyers in the anti-piracy arena, Tøndel tries to blur civil and criminal law to obtain leverage. The police are clear - their priority is investigating real crimes, such as murder and robbery and sadly for him, file-sharing does not fall into those categories. Tøndel must now make his claims against alleged pirates in a civil court.

      Following this major setback, Tøndel wrote to the Department of Justice and demanded a meeting with them. Unfortunately for Tøndel, the response wasn't what he'd been hoping for -the Department of Justice completely refused him a meeting- leaving him to start suing IP addresses, which he's not allowed to do. Ouch."
      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by OECD (639690)

        Tøndel must now make his claims against alleged pirates in a civil court.

        Nooooo! The humanity!!! Think of the terrorists/children!

        Barely off topic: How hard is it for a Yank to immigrate to Norway?

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Scrameustache (459504)

      This is just the same old "gateway crime" argument, which, if history is any example, will inevitably be scientifically proven false by statistical studies showing (perhaps a correlation, but) no causation.
      Science which will be ignored by lawmakers and buried by the media [salon.com].
    • by Samgilljoy (1147203) on Wednesday February 20, 2008 @10:30PM (#22498224)

      This is just the same old "gateway crime" argument, which, if history is any example, will inevitably be scientifically proven false by statistical studies showing (perhaps a correlation, but) no causation.

      And the old gateway crime argument is just a form of the ancient post hoc ergo propter hoc fallacy.

      People fill in the gaps in their information with ideology. Unfortunately, a great deal of law enforcement training perpetuates these ideas. Time and again, they'll tell you that people convicted of felony X first committed misdemeanor Y, but they fail to notice that they have no idea how many people actually commit misdemeanor Y without ever coming under the radar. Counterarguments which are under the radar, like the hordes of people who smoke pot but don't do crack, are filed away as potential crack smokers rather than demonstrations that smoking pot does not necessarily lead to smoking crack. They also ignore extensions of their own arguments, and not just the ad nauseam examples. For instance, one could just as easily say that drinking beer leads to smoking crack even in adults, but they won't. Why causal linkages between beer and pot and crack are so strong in kids, while the link between beer and anything "druggy" magically disappears during adulthood is beyond me, but then, I only had 9 years of full-time University education and 3 years of doctoral research, so I guess I ain't clever enough to suss out thar thinkun'

  • While it may be true (Score:5, Interesting)

    by joeflies (529536) on Wednesday February 20, 2008 @09:13PM (#22497590)
    that people involved in piracy of US copyright overseas may be involved in organized crime, it doesn't seem to match the profile of the people they are suing. If they want to fight organized crime, terrorists, etc, then shouldn't years of effort resulted in at least one lawsuit against a terrorist?
    • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday February 20, 2008 @10:02PM (#22497990)
      "If they [RIAA} want to fight organized crime,.."

      Family doesn't fight family - capish?

    • by kb0hae (956598) on Thursday February 21, 2008 @01:00AM (#22499214)
      The RIAA and MPAA need to get their shit together.

      1-When I rip songs from a legally purchased CD to OGG files on my computer, that is NOT piracy, anymore than making a compilation CD of my favorite songs from my collection of legally purchased CD is.

      2- Recording from radio and TV stations that are broadcasting over the air has always been allowed...it is NOT piracy.

      3-P2P downloads of music and movies have been shown to increase sales of music and movies...People don't like to buy something that they haven't heard/seen. Downloading copyrighted movies and music via P2P IS piracy, but it is not hurting the movie or music industry as much as they are hurting themselves by trying to hang on to their outdated business model, and treating their customers like they are ALL criminals.

      4-This is the Big One...The RIAA, and MPAA need to go after the big pirates...you know...the ones who are making hundreds of thousands of illegal copies of copyrighted movies and music, and selling them all over the world.

      Of course, I am not saying anything that the folks on /. don't know...
      • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

        by poot_rootbeer (188613)
        Recording from radio and TV stations that are broadcasting over the air has always been allowed...

        It's always been tolerated. "Allowed" is perhaps too strong a word, since there's nothing in copyright law that explicitly affirms one's "right" to create for personal use a permanent copy of a protected work that has been freely distributed.

        The RIAA, and MPAA need to go after the big pirates...you know...the ones who are making hundreds of thousands of illegal copies of copyrighted movies and music, and selli
  • by hedgemage (934558) on Wednesday February 20, 2008 @09:14PM (#22497600)
    That music downloads only led to communism.
    http://www.modernhumorist.com/mh/0004/propaganda/mp3.cfm [modernhumorist.com]
  • by LordKaT (619540) on Wednesday February 20, 2008 @09:14PM (#22497604) Homepage Journal
    NO. Fucking stop it.

    STOP RIGHT THERE GOVERNMENT.

    I am not going to let you use my tax money to start a "War on Piracy" - just like your dumbass "War on Drugs"

    STOP. BAD DOG! NO BISCUIT FOR YOU!

    Seriously, the only way you can teach these fucking politicians is by hitting them in the nose.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by QCompson (675963)

      Seriously, the only way you can teach these fucking politicians is by hitting them in the nose.
      So, to follow the war on drugs analogy, we should... keep voting for them?
  • Humorous (Score:5, Insightful)

    by eldavojohn (898314) * <eldavojohn AT gmail DOT com> on Wednesday February 20, 2008 @09:16PM (#22497614) Journal
    This is the one with Tom Cruise [gawker.com], right?

    I have not seen the video but I find it quite humorous when some organization's materials for training/brainwashing are leaked and it makes headlines. I.E. Scientology, RIAA, etc. What would even be funnier if the RIAA took the same position the Church of Scientology did and tried to repress this video.

    Repression of information is the first sign of a flawed ideology. As we've seen in many court cases in which they've shut down systems, the RIAA is against any kind of information sharing via P2P software and therefore has a flawed ideology.

  • Music piracy is the new gateway drug, I can't way to see the propaganda, sorry "educational" videos in the style of those movies such as Reefer Madness.

    Innocent teenager downloads a couple of songs with some mates off the internet for a bit of a laugh.
    Fast forward 6 months and he's wandering around the streets with a gun and portable hard drive leeching music off people at gunpoint.

    OH GOD THE HUMANITY!!!!!!
  • It was the heady days of the dot com era, and I was but a wee lad hacking away in my bedroom. One fateful day I stumbled upon a website called Napster [wikipedia.org], and soon began downloading hordes of ill-gotten music. Before long, my insatiable craving for tunes led me to buy more hard drives, then a RAID enclosure, then an enterprise-level SAN... I should have seen the warning signs.

    I gradually withdrew from my friends and family, unable to control my urge for more tunes. I knew it was wrong, but it felt so... right. I began using other filesharing software, and soon experienced strange hallucinations involving limes and wires. I told a friend about it, and he gave me some pills to help me sleep better at night. The troubling dreams and hallucinations faded, but now I couldn't stop taking the pills. Chain smoking, heavy drinking, and chronic pacing soon developed. I was having trouble concentrating on anything other than file swapping, and began using crack cocaine to improve my focus. My teeth began to loosen in their sockets, and I was fired from work after failing a drug test.

    Now I live on the streets, feeding my addiction through unsecured wireless hotspots that I access through a Pentium 90 connected to an exercise bike generator. My crack cocaine consumption has skyrocketed due to my need to constantly pedal the bike lest my rig lose power. Heed my warning: sharing and downloading music will ruin your life! Contact your local RIAA liason to seek treatment immediately. It's not too late... friends don't let friends use filesharing software.
  • Training? (Score:5, Funny)

    by ezwip (974076) on Wednesday February 20, 2008 @09:17PM (#22497630)
    If you have not seen the video you can search for it on piratebay.org
  • Drug dealers dont make enough money forcing them to supplement their income by pirating CDs? Maybe they are winning the war on drugs. The cheaper prices must be a garage sale like Toshiba is doing with HDDVD.
  • The Irony Is... (Score:5, Insightful)

    by fsckr (965056) on Wednesday February 20, 2008 @09:25PM (#22497692) Homepage
    That many of the 'artists' that the RIAA protects are hardcore repeat offender criminals that are pimping the handguns, drugs etc etc
  • ROFFLCOPTER (Score:5, Informative)

    by Creepy Crawler (680178) on Wednesday February 20, 2008 @09:25PM (#22497704)
    The story forgot something...

    The link of the TORRENT [thepiratebay.org] ...or search RIAA training video on piratebay
  • You know what? (Score:5, Interesting)

    by The Ultimate Fartkno (756456) on Wednesday February 20, 2008 @09:31PM (#22497738)
    I'm in the entertainment industry. I'm one of those corporate media whores who "hasn't come up with an original story in decades" and "keeps shoveling sellout pop shit down (your) throats" and "wouldn't know real talent if it walked up and kicked (me) in the balls." I'm part of the complex, epic machinery that creates the media that all of you "share" because it's all shit and worthless and you wouldn't bother downloading it if you weren't "sticking it to teh mang" and at the end of the day my rent and car payment and grocery store bills all depend on selling the stuff that you all pretend to loathe while you're copying it at terabytes per day.

    And, sadly, all that being said I'd still rather have you guys steal all my work in "protest" than have the RIAA represent me and blame the Pirate Bay for 9/11, herpes, Ashlee Simpson's "career," and the fucking Kennedy assassination.

    Seriously. I hate those assholes.

    I still have rent to pay, though, so go buy a fucking CD you torrented or something, okay?
    • by mdenham (747985) on Wednesday February 20, 2008 @09:46PM (#22497864)
      Considering how I don't listen to any (well, hardly any - "Still Alive" is catchy) music newer than about 1987, how about you just burn me a "Best of Black Sabbath" album and I'll write you a check for $6.95?
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by evanbd (210358)

      People on the internet are diverse. Those of us who complain about the RIAA and modern pop music aren't necessarily the same ones downloading their wares. It's no more reasonable to lump all internet users together than it is to lump all musicians or RIAA employees -- less so, in fact, seeing as it's a larger and more diverse group.

      Oh, and I have bought CDs I torrented. In fact, I've got a couple sitting in an online shopping cart waiting for another addition or two. You may find it odd, but exposure

    • by Smordnys s'regrepsA (1160895) on Wednesday February 20, 2008 @10:00PM (#22497972) Journal
      Most of us WANT you to lose your job. Nothing against you personally. A lot of us know how you feel, stuck in a dieing job with bosses who don't understand what is happening with/to the world.

      I don't hate your musicians, I just hate the fact that some spoiled brat can make twice as much as me with half the effort and no college degree. I hate that those brats are being taken advantage of by overgrown bullies that make more money than I can, with low level degrees from classes whose main requirements to graduate are Show Up, and Bullshit Convincingly. I hate that there are sound technicians who took years out of their lives to learn how to use complex machines to make music sound better, when I can do the same damn thing with a $500 microphone, $1000 computer, and free/second-hand software that requires a week of spare time to master ($500 mic optional, I've heard some damn good professional-quality music come from a $25 mic).


      Lucky for you for as bad as your industry's future looks, it will take quite a while to crash and burn. Enjoy it while it lasts.
    • never mind all that.

      just give us the damned URL or torrent and shuddup.

      and don't call us, we'll call you.
    • Well, you want my two cents?

      Because that's probably all you'll get out of it if I were to buy a CD, or a legal download, after the RIAA take their cut.

      - RG>
      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        I think you and the brown guy are confused about how people get paid. Most people in the "entertainment industry" get a salary or hourly wage for doing their job, just like your average IT worker gets paid a certain amount for performing their job function. The amount of sales of the product in a given month has no direct impact on their paycheck, and they aren't paid a proportion of sales.

        However, if not enough people buy the product, the business starts laying off salaried staff to try to reduce their o

    • by Dzimas (547818)

      Which Kennedy assassination would you like us to blame you for? ;) The global music industry is worth somewhere in the region of 30 billion dollars per year. That's a stunning amount of money for a discretionary product - after all, no one needs to purchase the latest hit songs. In the old days, one could make an argument that purchasing a $5.88 LP or cassette was "decent value." After all, there was no other way to obtain a high quality copy of a favorite song. In exchange for my money, I received physical

    • Is to look at going a more indipendant distribution route. Talk to someone like CD Baby and maybe start selling through them and on your website. If you want a way to sell your stuff that is outside of the RIAA controlled crap, well there you go.
  • by Anonymous Coward
    While it is good to have employees believe in the company I do not think that is what this video is about. They want high profile crime with media coverage to be associated with piracy. This will cement the "evil" in the publics view of piracy. Even if it is incidental, having that association there will eventually cement the opinion.

    Its not saying where you find piracy there will be terrorism. They are saying to law enforcement to use piracy as an excuse to bust otherwise known criminals. This will lead to
  • by DigitAl56K (805623) on Wednesday February 20, 2008 @10:07PM (#22498022)
    Gizmodo [gizmodo.com] wrote:

    This is a leaked official RIAA training video produced with the National District Attorneys Association telling U.S. prosecutors why they should bust music pirates: Because it'll lead them to "everything from handguns to large quantities of cocaine [and] marijuana," not to mention terrorists and murderers!
    Like the author of TFA, I haven't seen the video (yet), but I'd hope conversations with members of the judicial system go something like this:

    RIAA: "When we followed leads gathered in the process of prosecuting people for piracy we found other people we could prosecute for drug possession, terrorism, and murder!"

    J: "Are you trying to say that the people you originally investigated were guilty of drug possession, terrorism, and murder, and that all people you intend to have prosecuted for piracy will also be guilty of drug possession, terrorism, and murder?"

    RIAA: "Well, erm.. no..."

    J: "So.. what are you saying?"

    RIAA: "Well, piracy could benefit drug dealers, terrorists, and murderers, and so you should prosecute pirates with heavy penalties!"

    J: "Have you filed charges against, say, The Pirate Bay, for sponsoring drug dealing, terrorism, and murder?"
    RIAA: "Well... no..."

    J: "Wouldn't you say that anybody providing a service to unknown clients, e.g. a website, may quite innocently service drug dealers, terrorists, and murderers in exactly the same way it would service law abiding citizens, making just as much differentiation between the two as your local laundromat?"

    RIAA: "Ummm... we need a recess..."
  • If they show this to the DA does the Defense have the right to view it or can the RIAA try to keep it from them.
  • Here We Go Again (Score:5, Insightful)

    by hyades1 (1149581) <hyades1@hotmail.com> on Wednesday February 20, 2008 @10:15PM (#22498088)
    "Reefer Madness" for a new generation.
  • Relax (Score:3, Funny)

    by fahrbot-bot (874524) on Wednesday February 20, 2008 @10:24PM (#22498170)
    It argues they should pursue piracy cases because it leads to bigger and badder wares, like handguns, drugs, terrorist orgs, and hardcore repeat offender criminals.

    Relax, the RIAA is just speaking from *personal* experience. Pursuing piracy cases has lead them to become hardcore repeat offender criminals. The video is a *warning* : if it can happen to them, it can happen to you - ooooooooo

  • WMD? (Score:5, Funny)

    by Duncan Blackthorne (1095849) on Wednesday February 20, 2008 @10:44PM (#22498302)
    Bittorrent == WMD (Weapon of Mass Downloading)?
  • by Landshark17 (807664) on Thursday February 21, 2008 @01:21AM (#22499302)
    *two brothers, Billy and Timmy come home, Billy is listening to his iPod*

    Mom: Billy, did you legally obtain all the music on that iPod?
    Billy: Yes, mom.
    Mom: Mrs. Johnson told me her son lent you a CD... you know that's piracy!
    Billy: But, mom!
    Mom: No "buts"! You're grounded and no internet for you until we're sure the RIAA isn't tapping our computer!
    Billy: But Timmy stabbed a kid at school today!
    Timmy: The voices tell me to hurt people.
    Mom: Did he violate international copyright law?
    Billy: There were cops and an ambulence and everything!
    Mom: You didn't answer my question.
    Billy: No. He didn't.
    Mom: That's right. Now you go to your room. Timmy, would you like some ice cream?
    Timmy: I want to burn things.

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