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Sun Microsystems The Almighty Buck News

Sun Microsystems May Have Violated Bribery Law 111

Posted by Soulskill
from the my-friend-abraham-lincoln-asks-you-to-look-the-other-way dept.
Afforess writes "In a new file submitted to the Securities and Exchange Commission, Sun Microsystems admitted that 'we have identified potential violations of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, the resolution of which could possibly have a material effect on our business.' The Foreign Corrupt Practices Act makes it 'unlawful to make a payment to a foreign official for the purpose of obtaining or retaining business for or with, or directing business to, any person.' Yet, Sun would not release further details, only that it 'took remedial action.' Oracle, the new owner of Sun Microsystems, also said that they had prior knowledge of the infraction, yet also refused to release any details."
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Sun Microsystems May Have Violated Bribery Law

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  • by rackserverdeals (1503561) on Saturday May 09, 2009 @08:24AM (#27887777) Homepage Journal

    For those of you that won't RTFA, this may not be a big deal and is fairly common.

    For example, in 2007, networking provider Alcatel-Lucent agreed to pay $2.5 million to settle charges that Lucent Technologies, before it was bought by Alcatel SA in 2006, illegally paid for hundreds of trips for Chinese officials to win contracts. In a separate case, IBM Corp. agreed in 2000 to pay $300,000 to settle allegations that its Argentina subsidiary was involved in bribing officials of a government-owned bank to win a contract to upgrade the bank's computer systems.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Everybody's doing it. Everybody knows everybody's doing it. There's no jail time and the fines are light, so corporations are happy to break the law and pay the money. The government doesn't actually care about foreign corruption. It's basically a tax on doing business abroad.

      • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday May 09, 2009 @09:33AM (#27888177)

        They DO care about foreign corruption. Thats money that could have been paid to US government officials.

        • by Zarluk (976365)
          Then, perhaps they should investigate what happened here in Portugal... strange businness occurred between Microsoft and the government.
          • by MrPhilby (1493541)
            Indeed it did and now all the local telecoms are busy selling wireless internet to schoolchildren, even if they can't get a signal. Magalhaes google it.
      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by squidguy (846256)
        There's no jail time and the fines are light
        Oh really? Check out the fine they slapped on Siemens last year. 1.6 billion USD... See http://www.secactions.com/?p=655 [secactions.com]
      • Every unethical person is doing it.

        It may come as a surprise to many people that have never worked in a big corporation, but ethics are taken seriously, when individuals decide to ignore ethical guidelines more often than not the guilty party is disciplined, but in many cases you may not get to know about this.

        In all the big companies where I have worked we received training about these topics, even if we were not actually facing costumers at all. These training was refreshed at least once a year, and this

    • Re: (Score:1, Offtopic)

      I always thought this rule only applied to Defense Contractors like Northrop or Lockheed (we get lectured about it constantly). I had no idea it applies to regular businesses too. Interesting.

      Also:

      Can someone tell me what's wrong with Slashdot's front page? I want my low-bandwidth, dialup-friendly version back but despite changing my preference multiple times, I'm getting some frakked-up yellow-and-white monstrosity.

      • by JustOK (667959) on Saturday May 09, 2009 @09:24AM (#27888121) Journal

        Can someone tell me what's wrong with Slashdot's front page? I want my low-bandwidth, dialup-friendly version back but despite changing my preference multiple times, I'm getting some frakked-up yellow-and-white monstrosity.

        you have to bribe someone to get what you want

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by DriedClexler (814907)

        Can someone tell me what's wrong with Slashdot's front page? I want my low-bandwidth, dialup-friendly version back but despite changing my preference multiple times, I'm getting some frakked-up yellow-and-white monstrosity.

        Ditto. It looks like it's telling my browser to render it by some RSS settings. I see a lot of the tags like "em" "/em".

        Is it really that hard for you idiots running slashdot to leave well-enough alone? If it ain't broke, don't sodomize it beyond recognition.

        • Re: (Score:1, Offtopic)

          I ask that question every time a new piece of software arrives. Sometimes the upgrade is worthwhile, but oftentimes "they" change things and make them worse not better. Like when Microsoft got rid of the "turnoff computer" option in Vista, and I couldn't figure out how to do a proper shutdown. (How was I supposed to know some obscure |> thing meant shutdown???)

          Anyway...

          I fixed the front page by switching from Low bandwidth to Simple design. The LB option still needs fixing though - it shouldn't be sh

        • by equivocal (655448)
          Me too.
          Except the colors--I override those.
    • by Anonymous Coward

      ...and settling in US, I have seen a lot of bribery in Action, here and back home.

      Place where I work, large bank here in US, a contractor wins all the contracts for software development. Not because he is competitive, but because he sponsors the directors horse racing team. On paper its clean, XYZ has a horse racing team, PQR sponsors the team. In the bank, Mr XYZ awards all contracts to Mr PQR.

      Back home, PQR would have just handed over keys to a new car to XYZ.

      That is the only difference.

      West has learned h

      • How particulars decide to complete business deals is up to them.

        The situation you describe is distasteful and perhaps immoral, but I doubt very much it would be considered illegal.

        If either party was an elected representative then you would have a point, as it stands you simply look completely confused....

    • For those of you that won't RTFA, this may not be a big deal and is fairly common.

      For example, in 2007, networking provider Alcatel-Lucent agreed to pay $2.5 million to settle charges that Lucent Technologies, before it was bought by Alcatel SA in 2006, illegally paid for hundreds of trips for Chinese officials to win contracts. In a separate case, IBM Corp. agreed in 2000 to pay $300,000 to settle allegations that its Argentina subsidiary was involved in bribing officials of a government-owned bank to win a contract to upgrade the bank's computer systems.

      It's nice to know our bribery laws basically equate to "where's our share - signed: the US government"

      • Not to excuse our government, but what other option do they really have? Put the multinational corporation's headquarters in jail? Hitting a corporation with a fine is speaking the only language that it cares about.
        • Not to excuse our government, but what other option do they really have? Put the multinational corporation's headquarters in jail? Hitting a corporation with a fine is speaking the only language that it cares about.

          How about imposing sanctions on their ability to market products in that nation, or jailing the executives responsible (even if oversaes by using the afore mentioned sanctions as leverage).

          No no.. that would have actual TEETH.

          if top corps were under threat of instantly losing their ability to sell, or instantly losing their top talent to the depths of federal prison, they would be stricter about their infractions.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by INT_QRK (1043164)
      In many (but not limited to) developing countries, especially those with oligarchic societies and institutions, what we in the west may assume to be "bribery" may just be another name for "respect for local authority and traditions" in conformance with local laws and customs. The company that "respects local authority and traditions," may have a chance (license, permission, contract) to do business in that country. Those who don't may complain self-righteously, but from a distance, please. Is there an ethic
    • by r0b!n (1009159)

      For those of you that won't RTFA, this may not be a big deal and is fairly common.

      Microsoft and OOXML

    • by niro5 (1081199)
      My job almost exclusively revolves around investigating potential FCPA violations by companies you've heard of. Fines imposed due to FCPA violations can be company ending, and I ensure you that people do go to jail. Now, that being said these violations do happen all the time. It is usually an individual, or group of individuals trying to get ahead while under massive pressure to perform and the violations are rarely clear cut. We always joke that we're going to find an email containing the words "bribe
  • by LatencyKills (1213908) on Saturday May 09, 2009 @08:25AM (#27887789)
    And it's naive to think otherwise. You want to do serious governmental business in Saudi Arabia/Egypt/Jordan? Some shiek/prince/royal family member is going to get some quid pro quo. And quite frankly it's more or less true in America as well. You think those Congressional reelection campaign coffers are going to fill themselves?
    • by toppavak (943659) on Saturday May 09, 2009 @09:06AM (#27888021)
      And that attitude, especially among instructors (I've spoken to several business school faculty espousing this view before), prevents this from ever changing. At some point one has to make a decision about what ideals are worth holding on to. Having spent a lot of time in a country where corruption at every level is rampant (India) and seeing many successful businesses run cleanly, I don't believe your equation is entirely accurate. It is a decision on our part as individuals as to whether we want to actively propagate corruption in developing countries or not. To preach ethical practices in business, engineering and science and yet consider those practices to be naive is nothing short of ludicrous.

      With the amount of harm it does to developing economies and the people that live there, doing business this way should be treated as a crime against humanity. It retards the progression of democracy and social justice abroad and creates future demand for corruption. Just because this was the way an older generation operated doesn't mean the new generations of leaders coming out of colleges now have to continue their mistakes. It all starts with the realization that one person can actually change the world- for good or for bad. The question you have to ask yourself is simple: which way do you want to change it?
      • by Entrope (68843)

        Bribery is an unwritten law in most of the countries where you see this kind of action. Where is your venom for them? Why should these countries not suffer embargoes or heightened tariffs because their governments permit -- and even require -- corrupt business practices?

        If and when international law comes down hard on officials who solicit bribes, I will agree that it should come down hard on the other side of that corrupt coin. Unfortunately, the people who will have to agree to that law are the people

        • by toppavak (943659)
          Thank you for your reply, to an extent I heartily agree with you, these governments themselves need to take action as well. But if everyone waits for the other side to take action, nothing will ever happen. I know that every now and then a number of these countries do make something of an effort- whether its genuine or for show, to clean themselves up. A couple years ago India through several politicians out of parliament for corruption. China hung several government officials for the same crimes as well. G
        • by sjames (1099)

          If U.S. businesses refuse to participate in bribes, it is essentially an embargo.

          As for getting rid of corrupt government officials, it may come down to a few good lynchings by dissatisfied constituents.

      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by LatencyKills (1213908)
        I agree with you completely, but if there's some mechanism to produce such change I don't see it. Just to take an example with which I'm familiar, say you're a large defense contractor and you want to sell something to Saudi Arabia. That's absolutely going to require a little something to their defense minister to even get your proposal in the door. You don't want to pay to play? Fine - Raytheon/BAE Systems/Lockheed/Kollsman/Northrop/etc etc etc are all perfectly willing to take your place. Enforcement
        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by toppavak (943659)
          Its definitely a big problem. It takes a certain critical mass to achieve change at the scales we need. I think inevitably its going to start with small companies and individuals, almost certainly in a set of industries where the lack of a "competitive advantage" based on deep pockets doesn't hurt as much. Just because we can be idealists doesn't mean we can't be realistic about achieving our goals as well. Public perception is a big deal and people appreciate honest, transparent efforts on the part of comp
        • "You don't want to pay to play? Fine - Raytheon/BAE Systems/Lockheed/Kollsman/Northrop/etc etc etc are all perfectly willing to take your place. "

          They all American companies or have heavy interests on the American market so they are controllable.

          "For every company that gets caught, a dozen more just did business"

          There you have the problem then, not on the other side of the fence.

          "and the US doesn't necessarily even want to catch you. Oh, on paper they do, but in reality you're talking billions of dollars of

          • by Darby (84953)

            They all American companies or have heavy interests on the American market so they are controllable.

            I think you mean "In Control". Heck, Ike warned about that specific industry and it's continued to be the worst threat to America for nearly 50 years of huge private profits at the public expense.

      • by drinkypoo (153816)

        And that attitude, especially among instructors (I've spoken to several business school faculty espousing this view before), prevents this from ever changing. At some point one has to make a decision about what ideals are worth holding on to.

        That's true, and a corporation has no morals or ideas, only profit or failure.

        Perhaps we should rethink corporations.

        Frankly, since Quid Pro Quo is very much the way things are done all over the world, this is only an attack by "The System" on the way the rest of the world does business. In the USA, the bar for bribery has simply been raised. Also, it is designed such that only people in "The System" can participate in bribery. It's called campaign funding, and you can only use money which was "properly" ra

        • by toppavak (943659)
          I think you're close to the right track. I'm not sure what the right track is, but I think you're heading in that general direction. The problem is in the motivation and mission behind corporations, right? When the business' mission is to generate as large a financial return as possible, things start to go a little awry. For this reason, I'm extremely interested in the growing social entrepreneurship movement- spanning the whole spectrum from socially-conscious business to financially self-sustaining non-pr
          • by drinkypoo (153816)

            Probably the best thing would be for all businesses to be co-ops. You can buy your way in or work your way in. There is no proxy voting, and the co-op has a charter.

            • by toppavak (943659)
              Well, even companies have a statement of incorporation that's essentially what a charter is for co-ops. I don't think the problem is necessarily the structure of the corporation itself but the motivations of the people who run them and the stated goals and missions of that corporation. The way I've heard it described before is that a company has a vision and a mission, its vision is tied to the products and services it offers and its mission is to execute well enough on its vision to make money. There's not
      • It retards the progression of democracy and social justice abroad and creates future demand for corruption.

        I disagree that all bribery is bad. As Murray Rothbard writes:

        "What of bribery of government officials? Here a distinction must be made between "aggressive" and "defensive" bribery; the first should be considered improper and aggressive, whereas the latter should be considered proper and legitimate. Consider a typical "aggressive bribe": a Mafia leader bribes police officials to exclude other, compe
        • by toppavak (943659)
          I think your last point is a straw man- a government that cannot be bribed is not necessarily then a government that cannot be changed especially since even theoretically "incorruptible" governments have systems in place to allow the interpretation of that law in the place of extenuating circumstances and questions regarding the intent of the law. Connecting that process of interpretation to monetary incentives is just... a really really bad idea. Bribes make change easier, but create a system of expectatio
        • "On the other hand, a "defensive bribe" has a radically different moral status. In such a case, for example, Robinson, seeing that gambling casinos are outlawed in a certain area, bribes policemen to allow his casino to operate - a perfectly legitimate response to an unfortunate situation."
          Defensive bribery, in fact, performs an important social function throughout the world."

          Yes, I can see how a drug dealer bribering local police so he can operate despite the fact that drug dealing is outlawed is a perfect

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by cenc (1310167)

        Sorry, but you miss the fact that most of these economies would not function without bribery. There simply is not sufficient rewards for people to do their job.

        For example, an official that only makes a few hundred dollars a month. Are you really expecting them to give a dam when their family is starving?

        Corruption in many places is simply market forces at work, where the market does not work.

      • by PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) on Saturday May 09, 2009 @10:37AM (#27888613)

        Transparency International: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transparency_International [wikipedia.org] and http://www.transparency.org/ [transparency.org]

        It's a tough road to take, but if everybody tolerates corruption, it ain't gonna go away, and it certainly hurts more than it helps.

        Bribery stories are my favorite from folks doing business overseas. In order to avoid direct bribery, some companies hire local "consultants," who get paid an obscene fee to help land the contract. What they do with their money doesn't concern the company paying the fee; the bribe is indirect.

        My all time favorite was from a government auditor who visited Korea to check up on three local suppliers to the US military. The suppliers made dinner arrangements, and told the auditor where to meet them. When he arrived at the restaurant, there were the three suppliers, with four prostitutes seated at the table, with one empty seat.

        What's so funny? The auditor had brought his wife along to see Korea, and came with him to the restaurant. One prostitute got her pay early, and the mood at the table afterwards was uncomfortable.

      • by alukin (184606)

        Therefore every American company must rise corruption level in every country where business is possible. Insightful! Brilliant!

        Oh, some companies can not do that, they do not pay bribes here in America and do not sell 8 ears old WinXP to air forces.

      • Bill Gates is the best example of a "clean" business man being massively successful. Bill's main assets were personality traits, having an parent who was an IP lawyer, and considerable good luck. He definitely engaged in abhorrent business practices, but he never bribe U.S. government politicians until the anti-trust people started coming after him.

        I'd say your best bet is avoiding the politician protection racket for as long as possible. It always seems like powerful companies get massive pay offs from

      • Every PROJECT a Contractor executes in India
        • he must give 10% of project value as COMMISSION aka PARTY FUND to govt irrespective of the political party in Government (Congress, BJP, Communists etc)
        • he must spend 20% on local goons and officials so that they do not DELAY, DISRUPT and DESTROY the project work
        • he gets 20% profit before TAX

        Hence the ACTUAL project is WORTH only 50% in India.

    • by s_p_oneil (795792)

      "First of all, you have to grease the local politicians for the sudden zoning problems that always come up. Then there's the kickbacks to the carpenters. And if you plan on using any cement in this building, I'm sure the teamsters would like to have a little chat with you, and that'll cost you. Don't forget a little something for the building inspectors. There's the long-term costs, such as waste disposal. I don't know if you're familiar with who runs that business, but I assure you it's not the boy scouts.

    • I was part of big projects in Mexico and at no point bribery was asked for, encouraged or existing.

      The company where I worked did not countenance this, and everybody in the industry knew it.

      Unsurprisingly we were very busy, our government clients knew we where trustworthy and were more comfortable dealing with us.

      At the end it is your ethics, if you can't makes business without doing things that are immoral or illegal you simply excruciate yourself from such deals, nothing is forcing you to associate with c

  • par for the course (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Pompatus (642396) on Saturday May 09, 2009 @08:25AM (#27887793) Journal
    There are quite a few countries who's culture is substantially different from the United States in which bribery is considered standard business practice. If you dont bribe an official in one of those countries, you dont get anything done.
    • by Sir_Sri (199544)

      yep. If you have employees in india they had to pay bribes probably to get on the train to to work, to buy a radio, get government ID, buy a Television.

      Everyone knows this law really means "don't bribe anyone in a country that would be outraged if you were caught, or don't get caught".

      Maybe if Sun had been able to pay better bribes, to more relevant people they would have gotten better contracts and wouldn't be in the mess they are now. That is the sad reality of doing business in most of the world.

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by value_added (719364)

      There are quite a few countries who's culture is substantially different from the United States in which bribery is considered standard business practice. If you dont bribe an official in one of those countries, you dont get anything done.

      No doubt true, but what's standard business practices today may not be the same tomorrow. Banking secrecy laws in countries like Switzerland, for example, have long been considered inviolate, but that's hardly the case today, is it? Chances are good that even more change

    • It's not a bribe. It's just a red envelope... for good luck. Happy New Year... in May.

      I joke but that's what actually happened when my grandmother had a telephone line installed in China. She wanted to make sure it doesn't mysterious get cut after the installation is done.

    • by Ihmhi (1206036)

      ...substantially different from the United States...

      ...in which bribery is considered standard business practice.

      That doesn't sound substantially different at all to me...

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by telso (924323)
      Culture substantially different? The US only passed a law banning this in 1977, Canada in 1988, while until 1998 Germany made such bribes tax deductible! It's called schmiergelder [www.cbc.ca]:

      Schmiergelder was the official name designated under German tax law permitting middlemen to deduct from their incomes bribes or any other payments to foreigners to secure the sale of German products. These deductions were called necessary business expenses. Schmiergelder is translated literally as "grease money".

      The practice o

    • by McGiraf (196030)

      "There are quite a few countries who's culture is substantially different from the United States in which bribery is considered standard business practice"

      but:

      There are quite a few countries who's culture is substantially different from the United States in which bribery illegal, even if you rename it lobbying.

  • I love this law (Score:5, Interesting)

    by erroneus (253617) on Saturday May 09, 2009 @08:28AM (#27887817) Homepage

    It's a law that is almost never followed by companies that do business overseas. And the reason they cite for doing it? Other companies are not bound by such laws and are free to engage in such practices which gives the other companies a "competitive advantage." It is practically chinese national culture that bribery occurs and is quite expected.

    But the other reason I love this law is that charges associated with it often disappear with "healthy contributions" to party and individual campaign funds.

    • Chinese culture? (Score:1, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      It's a law that is almost never followed by companies that do business overseas. And the reason they cite for doing it? Other companies are not bound by such laws and are free to engage in such practices which gives the other companies a "competitive advantage." It is practically chinese national culture that bribery occurs and is quite expected.

      But the other reason I love this law is that charges associated with it often disappear with "healthy contributions" to party and individual campaign funds.

      It should be noted that this incident so far has nothing to do with China, nor is bribery or such practices restricted to China.

      The way you put it, it sounds like you are making a broad generalization about Chinese culture supporting bribery and that Chinese culture is the cause of all this.
      It is particularly unsettling that you have singled out its "national culture" for bashing.

      • by erroneus (253617)

        The chinese example is just an example. Other cultures thrive on corruption and bribery. Mexico is famous for it as well. I think that it is important to note that I show that it is pretty universal regardless of how they paint and re-paint the pictures.

    • is interesting, but I have read many other posts in this thread that seem good too.

      It's tough to know who to mod up when I can only think about having to pay for my kids braces this year which is going to set me back about $5,000....
  • That Sun might have been supplementing the expenses of our poor, underpaid UKian MPs......

  • This is news?
    Stuff that matters?

    How and how? Why and Why?

    This is just business as usual in Corporate America, and has been for decades.
    Glad you finally showed up at the party.
    Have a cocktail and a hooker...it's all tax deductible...a business expense!

  • They should be listing any bribes they paid for approving OOXML (;-))

    P--dave

  • by cptnapalm (120276) on Saturday May 09, 2009 @09:24AM (#27888125)

    In my home state there are laws against bribery and corruption of course. One of them pertains to gifts. Included in the banned gifts are food. The rule is that you cannot accept food (usually cookies) from anyone unless you eat it in front of them.

    Now that last bit sounds odd, doesn't it. Obviously, the rules do allow you to accept a gift of food if you eat in front of them. So, in practice, this means that if you accept cookies for going the extra mile for somebody, you are CORRUPT and UNETHICAL!!! If, on the other hand, you are a politician and getting bought dinner by a lobbyist, you are a force for righteousness.

    Apparently.

    • Re: (Score:1, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward

      I would imagine that the rule was written with the idea that politicians could go out and eat dinner or get a cup of coffee and not pick up the tab, and that's fine- as well as the various big get togethers and fundraisers with finger food.

      As opposed to, say, receiving a 'food gift' that consists of an entire wine cellar.

      Standard operating procedures- someone wrote a law with one specific thing in mind, didn't think of any other way to interpret it, and it gets passed without anyone bothering to read it. Th

      • "I would imagine that the rule was written with the idea that politicians could go out and eat dinner or get a cup of coffee and not pick up the tab, and that's fine-"

        Is it?

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by T Murphy (1054674)
      Maybe change it so the only acceptable food is in the form of one cookie. That way people are free to show their appreciation, but it would be difficult for a lobbyist to do much since there is only so much someone is willing to do for an Oreo.
    • by Xtravar (725372)

      You just gave me a great idea!!!

      1. Become lobbyist.
      2. Feed politician diamond-chip cookies
      3. Politician passes diamonds, passes your law...
      4. Profit!!!

  • by CodeBuster (516420) on Saturday May 09, 2009 @09:52AM (#27888277)
    For those of you who are interested and have not already seen it, the Foreign Corrupt Practices act and international bribery by large corporations and wealthy individuals was covered in the "Black Money" episode [pbs.org] on Frontline. Obviously the Sun case, coming to light more recently and being much smaller than the frauds discussed in the documentary, is not mentioned, but the Sun case is just another smaller instance of a much larger problem.
  • Well, everybody here in Ukraine knows about M$ paybacks reaching 50%. The same in Russia. Affiliated companies do it every time they sell something to state. But M$ is "holly cow" of American economy and "secret weapon" of CIA so it can not be touched.

    One law for all?

  • Sun pays off foreign officials, Oracle rumages through garbage cans - excellent combination
  • Frankly, I find it just one more proof of cultural arrogance displayed by our politicians to regulate and criminalize what is clearly considered benign and acceptable behavior by many foreign cultures. We are hell bent on exporting democracy (as if it was some kind of magic sword) and our customs to everyone. In the process of saving everyone from himself we become entangled in countless, absurd wars. Why don't we worry about our own problems, within our own shores?
    • This is not an instance of "cultural arrogance." It has absolutely nothing to do with the modern exportation of democracy. Instead, it is the exportation of the Rule of Law (at least, in instances where it is in our best economic and political interests.)

      Corruption by government officials has been a problem as long as there has been government. There are certainly many countries in which bribery of the bureaucracy is endemic and pragmatically accepted as a fact of life, but I know of none where it is con

  • Paid to use Microsoft in South Africa
    http://www.education.gov.za/dynamic/dynamic.aspx?pageid=310&id=8553 [education.gov.za]

    Also, didn't Microsoft bribe officials to vote for OOXML approval as an ISO standard?

  • Big deal- when we would set up demo tables at conventions, if you didn't pay the dock boss, they would take their sweet 'ol time getting around to your spot. On the expense report my boss just put in "Bribes".

  • As an american owner of a company in south east asia this is normal here. I set aside 50% of my monthly profits to pay the locals. 30% to the police, 10% to the mayor, and another 10% to other random government officials to get things done. They stop by like clockwork every month to collect their "gifts". If I don't pay my business gets shut down or drugs are suddenly found in my house or property and I have to pay a lot more bribing everyone else to keep me out of jail. In some countries bribing or gifts i

  • ...this is the ONLY way to do business! Having lived in Russia for the past 12 years, I have some experience with this. "Do you want your license TODAY, or in 3 YEARS?"... The answer is usually pretty simple...
  • "party contributions" nowadays...

    Seriously... where is this different?

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