Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
The Almighty Buck United States News Technology

Treasury Goes High-Tech With Redesigned $100 Bills 515

Posted by samzenpus
from the it's-all-about-the-new-benjamins dept.
Hugh Pickens writes "AP reports that as part of an effort to stay ahead of counterfeiters, the Department of the Treasury has designed a high-tech makeover of the $100 bill with a disappearing Liberty Bell in an inkwell and a bright blue security ribbon composed of thousands of tiny lenses that magnify objects in mysterious ways. The new blue security ribbon will give a 3-D effect to the micro-images that the thousands of lenses will be magnifying. Tilt the note back and forth and you will see tiny bells on the ribbon change to 100s as they move. Tilt the note side to side and the images will move up and down."
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Treasury Goes High-Tech With Redesigned $100 Bills

Comments Filter:
  • No RFID tag?

    Tin foil wallet at the ready!

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by hedwards (940851)
      Eh, doesn't really matter since nobody carries hundreds. They're large enough that most places won't take them anyways. I think it's mostly tourists and people that don't actually use cash on a regular basis that carry them around.
      • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

        by Anonymous Coward

        Eh, doesn't really matter since nobody carries hundreds.

        What? I have paid with an 500 euros ($667) on an movie theater. They sure took it, but the teens besides us looked at us with a weird smile.

        Just because you don't carry doesn't mean nobody does.

        • Re:Wot? (Score:5, Funny)

          by X0563511 (793323) on Thursday April 22, 2010 @09:09AM (#31937986) Homepage Journal

          That weird smile was more likely a knowing "guess who's gettin' mugged later" look.

        • by xaxa (988988)

          What? I have paid with an 500 euros ($667) on an movie theater.

          I'm surprised they accepted it. They're risking ~€490 if it's fake, for a fake €20 the risk is much, much lower.

          In the UK some places don't accept £50 notes -- they're the highest value, and also the oldest (least secure) design.

      • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

        by Macrat (638047)

        Eh, doesn't really matter since nobody carries hundreds.

        Move out of your parent's basement and get a job.

        • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

          by Anonymous Coward

          Move out of your parent's basement and get a job.

          I have more than one parent, you insensitive clod!

      • Re:Wot? (Score:4, Funny)

        by PopeRatzo (965947) * on Thursday April 22, 2010 @08:29AM (#31937604) Homepage Journal

        Eh, doesn't really matter since nobody carries hundreds. They're large enough that most places won't take them anyways.

        My drug dealer takes them. He won't take change, though.

        • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

          by keefus_a (567615)
          I was talking to an attorney who was trying to explain to me that "dopers" love hot tubs. And said he could get me a good deal on a hot tub or a tanning bed. Anyway, he was representing the guy on an intent to sell charge for marijuana. He said, "I charged him $2500 and he paid me in cash with 20 dollar bills. You think he was guilty?"
      • Re:Wot? (Score:5, Interesting)

        by flosofl (626809) on Thursday April 22, 2010 @08:41AM (#31937678) Homepage

        Eh, doesn't really matter since nobody carries hundreds. They're large enough that most places won't take them anyways.

        You're joking right? While not pocket change, it's also not a terribly large amount of money either. I guess it depends on location, but in my neck of the woods it's not uncommon at all. I have never come across a place that refused a hundred dollar bill (or fifties).

        • Re:Wot? (Score:4, Insightful)

          by Convector (897502) on Thursday April 22, 2010 @09:55AM (#31938624)
          It's usually places like parking garages and gas stations that don't want to take them. But fifties seem to be more commonly accepted these days. Even the automated pay stations at the BWI parking garage will take fifties.
      • Re:Wot? (Score:5, Interesting)

        by Lumpy (12016) on Thursday April 22, 2010 @09:18AM (#31938062) Homepage

        Maybe you don't carry hundreds... But I do as well as most people I know.

        I don't have any problem spending them. In fact I have yet to find a place that will not accept a hundred as payment. Unless I'm being a prick and buying a pack of gum and paying with it.

      • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

        Trivia question: can you guess which bill is carried the most?

        Wrong, it's actually the $100 bill. Because everyone likes to look like a pimp/hi-roller/badass.

  • Still out of date (Score:4, Informative)

    by anarche (1525323) on Thursday April 22, 2010 @08:02AM (#31937402)

    pffft. put out a press release when you join the 20th century...

    http://www.questacon.edu.au/indepth/clever/plastic_banknotes.html [questacon.edu.au]

    • by Joce640k (829181)

      Ummm....the plastic ones would never be allowed in the USA - they don't absorb cocaine properly.

    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      by batkiwi (137781)

      I think the issue is that we (Australia) won't license the patent and actually print the money for all the countries that use it. Do you reckon the US would go for THAT?

      • Re:Still out of date (Score:4, Informative)

        by MoonBuggy (611105) on Thursday April 22, 2010 @08:20AM (#31937530) Journal

        From the linked article:

        Blank polymer substrate is also sold to a number of countries that print bank notes using their own facilities.

        Admittedly, though, I don't see the Americans being particularly enthusiastic about any part of the supply chain being out of their hands.

        Personally I care less about what they're made of and more about the sizes and colours. I know dollars are tinted now, but they're still basically green, and all the same size. Not a major issue, I know, but it's just that little bit less convenient when you're thumbing through your wallet.

        • Re:Still out of date (Score:5, Interesting)

          by OnlyJedi (709288) on Thursday April 22, 2010 @09:29AM (#31938226) Homepage

          Personally I care less about what they're made of and more about the sizes and colours. I know dollars are tinted now, but they're still basically green, and all the same size. Not a major issue, I know, but it's just that little bit less convenient when you're thumbing through your wallet.

          Or, if you happen to be blind, more than "a little less convenient". US paper currency has been ruled to be discriminatory to the blind [usatoday.com]. Unfortunately, this redesign does not address the issue.

          The biggest reason I've seen for not changing the size or adding raised/textured numbers that can be felt by hand, is that it would screw up vending machines. But there are a couple of points of counterargument. For one, can you say that older vending machines will be able to read this new redesigned bill either? It seems so totally different that it's unlikely.

          But even if it can, there's the second point; most of the many, many vending machines in the US accept $1 and $5 bills, selling $1.50 cans of coke or $1 bags of candy. Yes, there are a small number of machines selling higher priced items such as electronics, but these are much less common (and have higher profits as well). So, the solution is to start changing size from the top down, keeping the $1 bill the same. Only the relatively rare, high-profit machines need to be changed over to accept the new bills. The machines found in every school, shopping center, and transportation hub selling Coke and M&Ms don't have to be touched.

          • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

            by Cimexus (1355033)

            Yeah I don't buy the 'but think of the machines!' argument against changing the design of the US currency. Dozens upon dozens of other developed countries have changed currencies in the last 20 years. Australia switched from paper 100/50/20/10/5/2/1 dollar bills to polymer 100/50/20/10/5 dollar bills and $1 and $2 coins during the 90s. I don't remember any problems occurring with vending machines etc. A bunch of countries now license the Australian technology to print their own polymer money ... and they t

      • Re:Still out of date (Score:4, Interesting)

        by Zouden (232738) on Thursday April 22, 2010 @08:35AM (#31937646)

        Not true - while we do produce polymer banknotes for most of the countries that use them, we've also licensed the technology to Brazil, China and Israel for their own production. There's no reason the same couldn't be done in the US, apart from the Not Invented Here issue.

    • by The MAZZTer (911996) <<megazzt> <at> <gmail.com>> on Thursday April 22, 2010 @08:18AM (#31937524) Homepage
      We already have plastic money. We call them credit cards.
    • Well that's nice. I presume CSIRO has given the US royalty free use of the patent. What's that? They haven't? Ahh well there you go then.

      Please understand that for various reasons, not the least of which being the vast amount of US currency in use, the distance to Australia, and so on it would not at all work for the US to contract to Australia to print their notes.

      Also understand that a radical change in the materials of the notes could lead to problems in compatibility with various automated systems that

      • Re:Still out of date (Score:4, Informative)

        by anarche (1525323) on Thursday April 22, 2010 @08:34AM (#31937628)

        Also understand that a radical change in the materials of the notes could lead to problems in compatibility with various automated systems that deal with them.

        I think this is probably a bit more important than otherwise noted.

        I don't see why CSIRO wouldn't license polymer notes, they license wireless networking...

    • Re:Still out of date (Score:4, Informative)

      by physburn (1095481) on Thursday April 22, 2010 @08:34AM (#31937632) Homepage Journal
      err, that was 10 years ago, the 20th century, did you miss the millennium. But if you want futuristic money, read last weeks new scientist, http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg20627562.700-schrodingers-cash-minting-quantum-money.html?page=1 [newscientist.com]
    • by mitchells00 (1181549) on Thursday April 22, 2010 @08:45AM (#31937728)

      The US Treasury Department is testing polymer bank notes, but there are concerns that the American public will reject a plastic Greenback.

      Are they serious? Americans wouldn't like more durable plastic money because it's not American paper money? I've never lived in a world with paper money, and whenever I go overseas I always notice that paper money is flimsy and often torn, not to mention in the tropics it's sweaty. Plastic money is the way to go.

      • by DrXym (126579) on Thursday April 22, 2010 @09:05AM (#31937950)
        Are they serious? Americans wouldn't like more durable plastic money because it's not American paper money? I've never lived in a world with paper money, and whenever I go overseas I always notice that paper money is flimsy and often torn, not to mention in the tropics it's sweaty. Plastic money is the way to go.

        The US "rejects" changes to its currency because it never pushes changes properly. The dollar coin being one example. How do you get people to switch from dollar bills to dollar coins? By not printing dollar bills any more and taking them out of circulation when they go through clearing. Eventually everyone switches whether they want to or not. As a further incentive you pass legislation that makes old currency non-legal tender after some reasonable point, after which people must exchange it at a central bank.

        If the situation with dollars sounds pathetic, that's because it is. European countries are far more adept at switching notes than the US, so adept in fact that most of Europe switched entirely from one entire currency to another in the space of a few months. Not only does it mean currency can more readily introduce anti counterfeiting measures but can also include more features for blind & sight impaired people too such as coloured notes & size differences in coinage.

    • Re:Still out of date (Score:4, Informative)

      by Kenshin (43036) <kenshin@@@lunarworks...ca> on Thursday April 22, 2010 @08:45AM (#31937734) Homepage

      Canada's joining you Aussies with the plastic currency soon. Next year, I think, our money is making that transition. (Let's hope they don't make the design worse. Tories + Committees generally = Bad Design.)

    • pffft. put out a press release when you join the 20th century...

      http://www.questacon.edu.au/indepth/clever/plastic_banknotes.html [questacon.edu.au]

      I suppose that you missed this quote from the very article that you link to:
      "The US Treasury Department is testing polymer bank notes, but there are concerns that the American public will reject a plastic Greenback."

  • If I were a counterfeiter, I'd make only $5 and $10. Sure, it'd be less cost effective, since the cost of printing a $1 or $100 is the same, but no one would suspect my bills are fake.
    • Wouldn't it be easier to make quarters? What security features are there on them?
      • by nospam007 (722110) * on Thursday April 22, 2010 @08:11AM (#31937468)

        The security feature is that they cost more to make than their face value.

        • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

          Quarters don't, but the profit margin is still fairly slim. Only nickels and pennies actually cost more to make than they are worth.
      • by fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) on Thursday April 22, 2010 @08:21AM (#31937536) Journal
        Probably not. In quantities large enough to be worth the risk of Hard Federal Time(tm) coins are heavy and bulky. Plus, fabricating metal objects on any substantial scale is generally more of a pain in the ass, and is rather more visible, than printing paper.

        My(admittedly layman's) understanding, is that hundreds, to the degree they are counterfeited at all, are mostly the domain of Real Serious Actors(North Korea always seems to be on the list of suspects). Most domestic and/or fairly small-time operators are banging out twenties or smaller; because those are much easier to disseminate without attracting suspicion(counterfeit currency is worse than useless if you can't find a good way to spend it, or sell it to someobody who can, since merely producing or knowingly possessing is illegal; but it is only valuable if spent). Even if they are 100% authentic, most places will give you a seriously suspicious look if you show up with a brick of hundreds. No bored retail drone is even going to bother with a second glance if you pay your tab in a busy, dimly-lit bar with a reasonably plausible twenty or two.
        • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

          by KlaymenDK (713149)

          No bored retail drone is even going to bother with a second glance if you pay your tab in a busy, dimly-lit bar with a reasonably plausible twenty or two.

          A quick Google search would have shown you that it is in fact rather common for bored retail drones to panic over two dollar bills. :-p

        • Re:I don't get it... (Score:4, Informative)

          by BenEnglishAtHome (449670) on Thursday April 22, 2010 @09:35AM (#31938334)

          Even if they are 100% authentic, most places will give you a seriously suspicious look if you show up with a brick of hundreds.

          Until they get to know you.

          I am a creature of routine. Except for the exceptions, of course, I tend to go to the same places and deal with the same people. The Chinese buffet at which I eat lunch expects me to pay my $8.40 tab with a $100 bill. The Walmart where I drop in to pay my Discover credit card expects me to pull out a $2K, bank-sleeved pile of hundreds, plus a few more that I fish out of my pocket.

          Big exception: the dancers at the strip club. I love dropping $2 bills on the stage. They pick 'em up and look at 'em funny, sometimes for a long time.

          I always carry $2 bills. I call 'em my "stripper-confusers".

          Note: In my experience, Starbucks clerks will be nearly as perplexed nearly as often.

    • by Wdi (142463)

      Suitable paper and ink are hard to come by. You'd probably pay more than $5 for the materials on the black market.

    • Re:I don't get it... (Score:4, Informative)

      by stonewallred (1465497) on Thursday April 22, 2010 @10:26AM (#31939190)
      Nah, you take 5s and 10s, bleach them, then print 20s on the bleached bills. In the US the way that most places check currency is to mark it with a "magic" pen. If the mark is black it is a good bill. And since the "magic" pen just detects the fact it is genuine money, not the denomination, you can pass 20s all day at convenience stores and grocery stores.Hell, you can pass them in banks if yo mix them with real 20s in a smallish stack (too small for machine counting) They feel just like the rest and look like them unless closely inspected.
  • Pointless. (Score:4, Insightful)

    by jcr (53032) <[jcr] [at] [mac.com]> on Thursday April 22, 2010 @08:04AM (#31937416) Journal

    The idea behind making it hard to reproduce federal reserve notes is to keep counterfeiters from robbing us by expanding the money supply, but the Fed does exactly that on a scale that no independent counterfeiter could even imagine.

    -jcr

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      You do realise that you are welcome to trade only with currency that you consider valid, and to only trade with those who have the same opinion as you, yes?

      • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

        by bodan (619290)

        Actually, no. In many situations you are required by law to accept whatever is legal tender in the country you’re in.

        • Um, no, unless you're talking about repayment of debt. Even then, it's not a problem if you only trade with those who agree with you.

          I have a pen here. I'll give it to you if you give me your house. There's no way that means I have to accept the cash value of your house.

      • No. That is illegal. You are required by law to accept goverment currency and forbidden from accepting other currency.

    • by mcgrew (92797) *

      Well of course. Where do you think all the inflation in the '70s came from? How do you think they paid for the VietNam war? And guess what -- we have TWO wars to pay for now.

      War makes the folks who run the military industrial complex richer, and the rest of us poorer.

  • Samples? (Score:5, Funny)

    by McGiraf (196030) on Thursday April 22, 2010 @08:05AM (#31937424) Homepage

    Where can I get free samples of this new product?

    • > Where can I get free samples of this new product?

      www.federalreserve.gov

      Not exactly free...printing costs do apply.

  • by Cornwallis (1188489) on Thursday April 22, 2010 @08:06AM (#31937426)

    Presumably to amplify the smoke and mirrors used by the Fed to make it appear the bills are actually worth anything.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Myopic (18616)

      They are "worth" the political might of the United States. By accepting the bills, you are betting on the future political power of the USA. Similarly, if you accept gold coins, you are betting on the future trade value of gold.

      Any currency -- any at all -- is nothing more than a communal expectation of continued value. It's fine for people to think that (say) gold will retain its value better than (say) the USA, but it's hogwash to claim that one value is "real" and the other is not.

  • by pyro_peter_911 (447333) on Thursday April 22, 2010 @08:08AM (#31937442) Homepage Journal
    The real counterfitters that we citizens need to be worried about is the Fed and Congress inflating the value of our money away. If you haven't had your congressman's ear recently telling them to knock it off then now is a good time to do so.

    The Free Competition in Currency Act [downsizedc.org] and Federal Reserve Transparency Act [downsizedc.org] are good places to start. Talk to your congressman today and ask them to sober up.

    Peter

    • by JayWilmont (1035066) on Thursday April 22, 2010 @11:33AM (#31940238)

      Gold's price has gone from over $600 in the 80's, to less than $300 in the 90's back up to over $600 now. How again would this remove inflation & deflation? (The US dollar inflated between those two periods, so if gold is a counterweigh, then gold prices should have increased to match.)

      What happens if a huge amount of gold reserves are found? Everyone's money deflates.

      You do also know that we have fewer recessions than we did while in the gold standard, right?

      And that there is nothing preventing you from accepting gold as payment? See e-gold.com & their payments system.

      If you are going to claim that a government agency is defrauding you, then there needs to be evidence: the inflation rate in the US has been less than 5% for almost all of the last decade, and much of that time it has been less than 2%. And you do know that inflationary bubbles aren't the only cause of asset bubbles or the only cause of recession?

      A random metal is no more/less intrinsically valuable than random pieces of specially printed paper or of little black pixels in the shape of numbers on my bank's website.

      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        Gold's price has gone from over $600 in the 80's, to less than $300 in the 90's back up to over $600 now. How again would this remove inflation & deflation? (The US dollar inflated between those two periods, so if gold is a counterweigh, then gold prices should have increased to match.)

        The Free Competition in Currency Act [downsizedc.org] is not about returning to the gold standard. It is about putting some more competition into the currency market with the expected result that good currency will drive out the bad. By not allowing competing currencies people are forced to do business with dollars backed by nothing but the full faith and credit of the US. (Which, ain't what it used to be) Ideally, the Dollar would be the good currency and be made better by the competition.

        What happens if a huge amount of gold reserves are found? Everyone's money deflates.

        True. But what are the odds of

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by bmajik (96670)

        A random metal is no more/less intrinsically valuable than random pieces of specially printed paper or of little black pixels in the shape of numbers on my bank's website.

        Of course. But a random bit of metal is much harder to create out of thin air, and thus it is much better insulated against the problem of currency inflation.

        Currency inflation is the problem. It is what makes the USD and indeed the US economy a bit of a prisoners dilemma. If you attempt to store your wealth in US dollars, you will find

      • If you are going to claim that a government agency is defrauding you,

        The "Federal" Reserve is NOT a government agency: it's a public-private partnership. The Senate confirms the board of govenors. Member banks own the Federal Reserve's stock, and earn 6% per year return. It wasn't until the 1960's that excess profits were turned over to the Department of the Treasury.

        For the government, the difference between borrowing credit created with accounting entries from a private bank and borrowing the same sort of credit from the Federal Reserve is that borrowing from the Fed is ne

  • Counterfeiting (Score:2, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward

    Funny how the process of counterfeiting -- injecting paper money into the economy with nothing of actual value to back it up -- is exactly the same as what government does to cause inflation. The result? The criminal (er, government) holds more money, at the expense of everybody else whose dollars are now worth less.

    Of course, when you're at the top of the pyramid, your actions are sacred rather than criminal.

  • by codeButcher (223668) on Thursday April 22, 2010 @08:09AM (#31937454)
    Are they also Green? (Or will I be inhaling toxic combustion products when I use them to light up my Cuban cigars?)
    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by Nidi62 (1525137)
      That should be the least of your concerns. I'd be more worried about what all those lenses will do when you wipe your ass with the bills.
  • by HopefulIntern (1759406) on Thursday April 22, 2010 @08:10AM (#31937464)
    ...that mimics the virtue it symbolises.
  • I can already envision all kinds of geeks staring at it with a microscope, dropping odd fluids on it, etc, in labs across the world. Really, I don't understand how paper money still exists.
    • by characterZer0 (138196) on Thursday April 22, 2010 @08:41AM (#31937684)

      Really, I don't understand how paper money still exists.

      So you do not have to have your own credit card swiping machine and an account with a processor to sell something on craigslist.

      • Eh? My bank will still cash a cashier’s check. Or even a personal check, if I’m daring enough to accept one and the person who wrote it has the money in their account to cover it.

    • Really, I don't understand how paper money still exists.

      Next time you're at the grocery store waiting in a line that takes longer to get through than the drive home, look at the front of the line and you'll either see somebody writing a check or counting out bills and coins.

    • by mcgrew (92797) *

      Really, I don't understand how paper money still exists.

      Since I'm a cheapass, I don't use credit cards because of fees and interest. Because I had a debit card stolen and used by someone who watched me punch the PIN number in and drained my checking account, I don't use those, either. I write a check every few days, at the bank.

      Nobody can track what I buy or where I buy it. Paper money is the only way to be anonymous; I bought my Boost Mobile phone with cash and pay the $50 monthly fee with cash, nobody has

      • by sartin (238198)

        Get a no fee credit card and pay it off every month.

        You can't even get a cab or bus ride without cash.

        You can here (Austin, TX). Credit card to get a transit pass - at varying levels of convenience and planning ahead since they can't use a CC at bus stops or on busses. Credit card in the cab. Last time I was in Chicago I paid for my CTA pass with credit at the station at O'Hare. Never rode a cab, so not sure about them, but even NYC cabs take credit cards now.

  • by stomv (80392) on Thursday April 22, 2010 @08:13AM (#31937480) Homepage

    There's really no excuse for this. The bills should have different color and size to help the visually impaired. There's no good reason not to. Sure, don't change the $1 due to bill readers. I suppose there are $5/$10/$20 readers, though usually at the post office (and hence easy to change from the government's perspective). But really -- why not mix up the $50 and $100 so that they're easier for those with disabilities to use. It'd at least be a step in the right direction.

    • I believe there was a court ruling that says the Treasury has to do this at some point in the future. To the best of my knowledge, they're still investigating possible options, although if you look at the list of security features for the new bill, one of them is "raised perforations". Perhaps these are an identifier, like Braille?
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by hraefn (627340)

      I sympathize with your argument, I really do. Different sized bills would also make counterfeiting more difficult.

      However you forget that every bank branch in the country has at least one money counter; how many are there? As an example, Bank of America lists upwards of 6000 branches.

      There are something like 400,000 ATMs in the United States as well, how many of those would need modified?

      • by Xest (935314) on Thursday April 22, 2010 @09:02AM (#31937916)

        Many other countries have different sized notes, so I wonder if it would really even be hard or relatively expensive to modify them? The technology is already out there and I'd imagine companies that produce US money counting machines probably also produce money counting machines internationally such that the work could probably be done with existing suppliers.

        That's not to say it wouldn't cost more than your average Joe will earn in their entire life time of course, but I doubt the cost would be prohibitively expensive. It comes down the modifications required I suppose- it may be that the machines were built in such a way that there isn't room in the design for modification and they'd have to be completely replaced I guess and certainly at that point it could become an issue!

    • I suppose there are $5/$10/$20 readers, though usually at the post office (and hence easy to change from the government's perspective).

      You're omitting one of the largest markets for omni-bill readers: casinos. These readers will accept $1 through $100. (I dunno about $1000)

  • When Australia switched to the new plastic money, we changed over from old $100 to new $100 (for example) in a short space of time.

    Although I guess the total number of AU$100 bills in circulation worldwide is a LOT less than the total number of US$100 bills :)

  • Lets have open-source software money [letslinkuk.net]. Everyone neighborhood or town run their own bank. Most of our work goes to just pay bills because of all this financial waste.

    Local Exchange Trading Systems (LETS) [wikipedia.org] also known as LETSystems are local, non-profit exchange networks in which goods and services can be traded without the need for printed currency. In some places, e.g. Toronto, the scheme has been called the Local Employment and Trading System.

  • by T Murphy (1054674) on Thursday April 22, 2010 @08:33AM (#31937626) Journal
    Anyone know if they've released an update patch yet? I wish they would've warned me before my $100 went obsolete.

    (My school subsidizes the Fundamentals of Engineering exam, which was last weekend, otherwise no I wouldn't have a $100 on me).
  • Plastic money... (Score:3, Interesting)

    by nanoakron (234907) on Thursday April 22, 2010 @08:38AM (#31937658)

    UK resident here. I personally love it when new technology is introduced into banknotes, but those plastic ones the Australians have had for ages are just plain cool.

    The Indonesian plastic Rp100,000 note is also pretty damned cool.

    Wish we had 'em.

  • Charlie Eppes has it covered, see Season 1 Episode 7 of 13 Counterfeit Reality
  • Given that the world's highest denomination banknote is for €500 the same amount of effort that goes into forging an old $100 piece of paper gives higher returns with higher value notes. All this new tech in ther 100USD will do is make the baddies concentrate more on easier notes, it won't actuallt stop counterfeiting.
  • What's The Point? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by suss (158993) on Thursday April 22, 2010 @08:58AM (#31937870)

    All older bills are valid until they wear out. In other words; this is a pointless exercise unless they set an expiry date for older bills.

    • Re:What's The Point? (Score:5, Informative)

      by LordKronos (470910) on Thursday April 22, 2010 @09:42AM (#31938430) Homepage

      The idea is that the banks gradually remove them from circulation by sending them in to be destroyed and replaced with modern currency. It takes a while, but eventually the old bills become uncommon enough that their use becomes more suspect. For example, this is still valid us currency:
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:One_US_dollar_1917.jpg [wikipedia.org]

      but if someone tried to pay me with one, I think I'd be a bit suspicious. Especially if they tried using a whole bunch of them at once. Counterfeiters don't just spend a $20 here and a $20 there...they are in it big time and have loads of bills they need to unload.

  • by vinn01 (178295) on Thursday April 22, 2010 @08:59AM (#31937892)

    Most US $100 notes are circulated outside of the US. I don't know the percentage, but it's very high. Aside from legal users, there is a lot of people with large caches of $100 notes that our government doesn't like.

    In non-US countries the the phrase "legal tender for all debts public and private" carries no weight. They can be picky about what notes they accept. Every time that new US notes are issued, people with large hoards of US cash find that their old notes are no longer accepted and they have to scramble to get new notes. They get noticed.

  • Notes? (Score:3, Interesting)

    by skywire (469351) * on Thursday April 22, 2010 @12:31PM (#31941152)

    A one-hundred dollar 'note' that promises to give you another one-hundred dollar 'note' in exchange is no note. It is a self-referential monstrosity. The wording "THIS NOTE IS LEGAL TENDER FOR ALL DEBTS, PUBLIC AND PRIVATE" that appears on it is an insider joke at the expense of the schmucks who accept them.

Philogyny recapitulates erogeny; erogeny recapitulates philogyny.

Working...