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Radioactive Boar On the Rise In Germany 165

Posted by samzenpus
from the stay-in-the-car-while-I-check-this-out dept.
Germans who go out in the woods today are sure of a big surprise, radioactive boars. A portion of the wild boar population in Germany was irradiated after the Chernobyl nuclear meltdown, and the boars are thriving. In the last two years government payments to compensate hunters for radioactive boar have quadrupled. From the article: "According to the Environment Ministry in Berlin, almost €425,000 ($555,000) was paid out to hunters in 2009 in compensation for wild boar meat that was too contaminated by radiation to be sold for consumption. That total is more than four times higher than compensation payments made in 2007." I think the Germans are overlooking just how much money there is to be made from regenerating bacon.
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Radioactive Boar On the Rise In Germany

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  • by neko the frog (94213) on Monday August 02, 2010 @11:17AM (#33111534)

    GET OUT OF HERE STALKER

    • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

      by Runefox (905204)

      I said come in, don't just stand there!

  • No question marks in this one

    1) Kill Boar
    2) Irradiate it
    3) Sell to German government
    4) PROFIT!!!!111!!!

    • by slick7 (1703596)

      No question marks in this one

      1) Kill Boar 2) Irradiate it 3) Sell to German government 4) PROFIT!!!!111!!!

      Bacon that cooks itself, what's better than that, other than bacon with ketchup.

      • by Talderas (1212466)

        Bacon that cooks itself, what's better than that, other than bacon with ketchup.

        Bacon coated bacon that cooks itself in bacon fat.

        (With a side of ketchup)

        • Bacon coated bacon that cooks itself in bacon fat.

          You, sir are my new hero!

          (With a side of ketchup)

          Never mind you damn vegetarian freak!

      • by mangu (126918)

        Bacon that cooks itself, what's better than that, other than bacon with ketchup.

        Bacon coated with cheddar cheese inside a doughnut with ketchup.

    • The are going to put the meat in emergency/fallout shelters. It will keep indefinitely.
    • by h4rr4r (612664)

      You would make a lot more money selling the meat to resturants and it would involve less upfront investment as you would not need to purchase a radiation source.

    • by Culture20 (968837)

      No question marks in this one

      1) Kill Boar
      2) Irradiate it
      3) Sell to German government
      4) PROFIT!!!!111!!!

      Irradiated =/= Radioactive. Radioactive things can irradiate other things. Irradiated things _very_ rarely are ever radioactive. This is why irradiating food to kill pathogens should be more accepted, but the radioactive/irradiated conflation is what keeps the public fearful of irradiated food.

    • by RockDoctor (15477)

      Well, you set the challenge yourself :

      No question marks in this one
      1) Kill Boar
      2) Irradiate it
      3) Sell to German government
      4) PROFIT!!!!111!!!
      --
      rule number 1 of slashdot: ANY thread can be twisted into a bash of microsoft. no exceptions.

      OK, how are you going to twist this story into a MS bashing?

      [/Self : This should be good for a laugh if he can do it. And good for a laugh if he can't. Win-win!]

  • Germany stealing Blizzard IP or the other way round?
  • by powerlord (28156) on Monday August 02, 2010 @11:22AM (#33111596) Journal

    Boarzilla!

  • by Just_Say_Duhhh (1318603) on Monday August 02, 2010 @11:23AM (#33111618)

    Germany could market these as "Self-Cooking Boar!"

    Too lazy to cook? No fuel for your stove? No problem - just shoot, wrap in foil, and a few hours later...DINNER!

  • by Improv (2467) <pgunn@dachte.org> on Monday August 02, 2010 @11:23AM (#33111620) Homepage Journal

    Ahh, reminds me of my Magic: The Gathering days... cast "Wild Growth" on the "Dusterwaldkeiler" and goodbye to enemy "Serra Angel"s. Muhaha

  • What????? (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Dynedain (141758) <slashdot2@@@anthonymclin...com> on Monday August 02, 2010 @11:23AM (#33111622) Homepage

    I'm having trouble understanding how the Cherynobl meltdown [google.com] has anything to do with wild boar populations in southern Germany. The article specifically mentions Bavaria, a region a thousand miles (and several countries) away. I admit I'm just an ignorant American, but surely this doesn't make any sense? [google.com]

    • I'm having trouble understanding how the Cherynobl meltdown [google.com] has anything to do with wild boar populations in southern Germany. The article specifically mentions Bavaria, a region a thousand miles (and several countries) away. I admit I'm just an ignorant American, but surely this doesn't make any sense? [google.com]

      I'm just as clueless... But I'm going to assume that you've got radioactive dust drifting in the wind. Maybe?

      • by ColdWetDog (752185) on Monday August 02, 2010 @11:57AM (#33112054) Homepage

        I'm just as clueless...

        Just a idea. Sit down. Have a drink. Now don't get mad at me or all stressed out, I know it's hard to deal with new things. Just consider to concept at least:

        Read the Fucking Article.

        • Re: (Score:1, Interesting)

          by Anonymous Coward

          to all the nutt cases who think that "Nucular is the new green energy".... ... When Chernobyl blew up we (i lived in bavaria at that time) got a healthy dose (pun intended) of fall out from the wind drift.

          It was in fact so bad that no agricultural products could be sold that year, public playgrounds closed, and people generally were advised to not go outside.
          (and when they come back in, to decontaminate their shoes)

          I bought a geiger counter and was amazed that the lettuce from our garden was more radioactiv

          • Re:What????? (Score:4, Informative)

            by Grishnakh (216268) on Monday August 02, 2010 @12:20PM (#33112418)

            No, it's thanks to the Russian designers and managers who decided to build a crappy and unsafe nuclear plant.

            Germany is next-door to France, which has tons of nuclear plants, and sells lots of power to the rest of Europe. In fact, you might be using nuclear-generated power from France right now, since you're so close to them. How many disasters has France had with their nuclear plants? Zero?

            Cars can be very dangerous too, for instance if you put the gas tank in a place where it will rupture and explode in a small collision (like the Ford Pinto). Should we stop making all cars because of this? No, of course not; we stop making crappy, unsafe cars like the Pinto.

            BTW, I don't think the nuclear lobby had anything to do with nuclear plants in the Soviet Union. They didn't have lobbyists there, and environmental concerns weren't very important to Communist ideology.

            • Nothing major, but France has had a few issues [wikipedia.org] with their power plants.
            • IMHO nuclear power requires a kind of long-term thinking that is utterly alien to modern politicians and industry managers.
              Case in point: Back in the 1980s there was a political decision to develop an old salt mine (Gorleben [wikipedia.org]) into a long term storage for highly radioactive waste. But today it seems that the major reasons for that decision were
              A) Gorleben was close to the Border to East Germany
              B) The people there would be grateful for any jobs and would keep voting for the conservative parties forever

              Geology

        • Read the Fucking Article.

          Why the hell would I do that? This is Slashdot.

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Here's something that will really baffle your puny American mind:

      http://www.farmersguardian.com/home/livestock/scotland%E2%80%99s-chernobyl-sheep-no-longer-radioactive/32935.article

    • Re:What????? (Score:4, Insightful)

      by arose (644256) on Monday August 02, 2010 @11:32AM (#33111746)
    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by ceejayoz (567949)

      Never heard of fallout [dailykos.com]?

    • Re:What????? (Score:4, Informative)

      by kav2k (1545689) on Monday August 02, 2010 @11:35AM (#33111774)
      Look for fallout maps. Example, this one [wordpress.com]
    • Re:What????? (Score:5, Informative)

      by rrohbeck (944847) on Monday August 02, 2010 @11:35AM (#33111778)

      I guess you weren't around back then.
      There was no fresh milk, fruit or vegetables for some time in most of central, east and northern Europe because everything had to be tested and much had to be trashed. People were warned against collecting berries and mushrooms for years.
      The radioactive cloud went northwest to Scandinavia first and then southward to Central Europe.

      • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

        by powerlord (28156)

        The radioactive cloud went northwest to Scandinavia first and then southward to Central Europe.

        Then it swerved left and settled over France, first diminishing the intelligence of local elected officials (which went undetected), before finally being fermented into a new "glow in the dark" cheese.

        Happy to have finally found a home, the Radioactive Cloud settled down and while currently still unattached, hopes to one day have little "Containment Leaks".

        (sorry all, I think I'm in a giddy mood today)

      • Note that certain mushrooms are still contaminated! Chanterelle mushrooms are still somewhat radioactive, at least the ones from Belarus, and that's where most come from. You can only eat them a few times a year, which is truly a shame, as they are one of the most delicious mushrooms that exists.
        • by pclminion (145572)

          Look at it another way. Some species of mushrooms are wonderfully good at concentrating heavy metal elements, including radioactive ones. You let the fungus grow, then harvest it and put it in radioactive containment vessels. Now you are using fungus to actively extract and isolate the radioisotopes from the contaminated soil. Yes, it's a shame you can't eat the chanterelles but in some sense, it's nature trying to clean up after humans made a mess of things.

          The American chanterelles are much better anyway

    • by jaak (1826046)

      It's called radioactive fallout. A large plume of radioactive debris was spread over Europe (in fact, this was how the accident was first detected outside of the USSR, not because the authorities reported it).

      The debris contaminated ground water, lakes, rivers, forests, animals, livestock, etc. all over parts of Europe.

      I was in the UK at the time and I remember the contamination almost destroyed the lamb and mutton industry there.

      Wikipedia has some information on the effects of the disaster: http://en.wikip [wikipedia.org]

    • by burni2 (1643061)

      The radioactive fallout from "Tschernobyl" went down in several european countries. So in the first it's not a purely german problem, but we might have strikter rules for certain radioactivity levels.
      The radioactive isotopes are the problem as they stay active due to their rate of radioactive decay ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radioactive_decay [wikipedia.org] ). And those isotopes were thought to be taken deeper into the earth through rain. But boars have an interesting habbit .. they shovel into earthy grounds with the

    • by Solandri (704621)

      The article specifically mentions Bavaria, a region a thousand miles (and several countries) away. I admit I'm just an ignorant American, but surely this doesn't make any sense?

      Most of the U.S. sits between 30-48 degrees latitude. The prevailing winds there blow from West to East, so it's easy to understand your confusion about radioactive fallout making its way westward.

      Most of Europe sits from 40-60 degrees latitude, with Scandinavia going even higher. When you get up near 60 degrees latitude, the p

    • by tenco (773732)
      Beeing of age 5 at this time and living in bavaria, I remember that my parents didn't allow me to play outside (government recommendation) and dairy farmers weren't allowed to sell their milk for quite some time.

      If you ever wondered why nuclear energy isn't that popular in europe - that's the most likely reason.

    • It doesn't, the Wild Boar population increase is due to primarily milder winters, and that's independent of the the fallout from Cherynobl. There might be some cross-over from fewer people not hunting because the pigs are radioactive and inedible, but mostly it's just coincidence. I'm surprised nobody has cued up the AGW band yet.

    • Radioactivity fall out on earth,and is literally the radioactive long life element are absorbed by the tree and mushrooms, which are eaten by the boar, where the radioactive long life element cumulate. The radioactive cloud went over germany more than once.
  • Interesting factoid (Score:3, Informative)

    by ChienAndalu (1293930) on Monday August 02, 2010 @11:34AM (#33111766)

    Hunters also have to pay a fee to dispose of the boar carcass. So some let the animal go to a neighboring territory where the animals can be shot to be eaten.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    "You don't have to be a nuclear physicist to realize that it's only a matter of time before one of these deer reaches critical mass, and some unsuspecting sportsperson takes a shot at it, and BLAM, all that's left of the immediate forest is a large crater and a mushroom cloud containing billions of tiny glowing sports molecules. We can only hope, as caring humans, that such a tragedy never occurs; or, if it does, that it will be available on rental videocassette." --Dave Barry

  • Holy nostalgia! Thanks, samzenpus!

    Picnic time for teddy bears,
    The little teddy bears are having a lovely time today.
    Watch them, catch them unawares,
    And see them picnic on their holiday.
    See them gaily dance about.
    They love to play and shout.
    And never have any cares.
    At six o'clock their mommies and daddies
    Will take them home to bed
    Because they're tired little teddy bears.

    • And for those who don't understand the reference:

      From the article: "Germans who go out in the woods today are sure of a big surprise, radioactive boars."

      From the song: "If you go out in the woods today, you're sure of a big surprise. If you go out in the woods today, you better go in disguise..."

  • by GammaKitsune (826576) on Monday August 02, 2010 @11:52AM (#33111982)
    At least the Yao Guai and Deathclaw populations remain at normal levels.
    • I am not sure if Washington D.C. has any wild boar to be contaminated. (The parent post is a reference to Fallout 3)

  • So now we have wild animals that can be classfied as radioactive waste?
    Put it in the freezer for 50,000 years!

    Is anyone working on breeding an animal that concentrates human-made radioactive pollution, a biological wild skimmer?

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by natehoy (1608657)

      And, yes, such an animal exists. They are called "boar."

      (see also "sheep" in the UK, which have the same issue with Chernobyl fallout, and "reindeer" in certain Nordic regions, not to mention carnivores in a lot of places)

      Lichen (aka. reindeer chow), fungi (loved by boar) and certain other plants (probably including the grasses or some other plant that sheep eat a lot of) are apparently great radioactivity concentrators.

      Fortunately, C137 has a half life of about 30 years, not tens of thousands, so in a few

  • Obligatory (Score:3, Funny)

    by mathimus1863 (1120437) on Monday August 02, 2010 @12:01PM (#33112114)
    I, for one, welcome our new radioactive grass-eating overlords
  • "According to the Environment Ministry in Berlin, almost 425,000 ($555,000) was paid out to hunters in 2009 in compensation for wild boar meat that was too contaminated by radiation to be sold for consumption...."

    I'm sure that if we had a system of government payments for radioactive wild boar meat in the U.S.A. that there would be plenty of claims and payments here too. Any government program designed to hand out money attracts fraud in great numbers, why assume that this isn't happening here?

    • Re:fraud? (Score:4, Insightful)

      by h4rr4r (612664) on Monday August 02, 2010 @12:27PM (#33112532)

      Because untainted boar meat is far more valuable?

    • by Ihlosi (895663)
      Any government program designed to hand out money attracts fraud in great numbers, why assume that this isn't happening here?

      Artificial contamination with radioactive materials is trivial to test for and, in our current political climate, would land anyone trying to dabble in such things in prison for life + half an eternity for nuclear terrorism ... if they survive their arrest by the SWAT team (or rather, the SEK or GSG9).

  • by DdJ (10790) on Monday August 02, 2010 @12:10PM (#33112236) Homepage Journal

    ...must not make "Peter Porker" joke...

  • and the boars are thriving

    Pigs and People are pretty close, genetically speaking. They do medical testing on them, right?

    Maybe eating these pigs would yield some unforeseen benefits.
  • Bacon Brights - see in the dark dog food.
  • "Radioactive Boar" would be an awesome name for a heavy metal band...

  • If there are mutant boar running around that ruminate (i.e. chew their cud), you'd have the beginnings of a kosher pork industry.

  • welcome our pre-cooked bacony overlords.

  • "My grandparents reported that the day after the Chernobyl meltdown every flower in their yard had bloomed overnight. They said it was beautiful and very frightening."

    -- Anecdote related to me by a friend whose elderly grandparents live in Austria.

  • Glowing-Green Ham, and Eggs!
  • A portion of the wild boar population in Germany was irradiated after the Chernobyl nuclear meltdown

    I don't think merely being exposed to radiation would make the boars radioactive. If that were the case, we'd all be radioactive since we're exposed to it every day. Now, if the boars ingested radioactive material, I could understand.

"Ignorance is the soil in which belief in miracles grows." -- Robert G. Ingersoll

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