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Kuwait Not Banning DSLR Cameras After All 63

Posted by Soulskill
from the false-alarm dept.
Voulnet writes "The Kuwait Times, the newspaper that started the false rumor of Kuwait banning DSLR cameras, has posted an update saying that after investigation, it turned out they didn't verify their information. They have now issued a retraction. Quoting: 'The newspaper regrets failing to verify the information. The article wrongly stated that a ban on DSLR cameras was implemented by the Ministries of Information, Social Affairs and Finance. This information is false. In a follow up investigation, it was proved that no such ban has been issued. We regret this error and deeply apologize for any inconvenience caused.'"
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Kuwait Not Banning DSLR Cameras After All

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  • However, it'd probably be unofficially enforced.

    • Re: (Score:1, Interesting)

      by Anonymous Coward

      I guess it was a case of 'vorauseilender Gehorsam"

      'speeding ahead obediance' would be a litteral translation, meaning giving in to pressure, before the pressure even occurs.

    • If there's a rumor, it has started somewhere.

      Who profits from such a rumor? My bet would be on some consumer products retailer who is worried that too many people in Kuwait are buying DSLR cameras instead of the cameras he has in stock.

      Kuwaitis are rich enough to buy more sophisticated products than they really need and Kuwait is a small country where rumors spread fast, so this could be some kind of marketing effort.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday November 28, 2010 @03:28AM (#34362988)
    Well this should be encouraging to the slashdot editors, if their career doesn't work out at slashdot they can always go to work for The Kuwait Times.
    • Re: (Score:1, Troll)

      by the_womble (580291)

      They could work for almost any newspaper or broadcaster. Fact checking is something journalists used to do, these days its regarded as a waste of money that might spoil a good story.

      • by jc42 (318812)

        Fact checking is something journalists used to do, these days its regarded as a waste of money that might spoil a good story.

        Actually, that's pretty much the way it's always been. Yes, you can point out a few publications from various times that did fact checking. But at any given time, most of them didn't bother. Fact checking was a waste of time that could be better spent producing more stories for the customers to read. Ya gotta have lots of that sorta stuff to pad out the ads, after all.

        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by AK Marc (707885)
          Fact checking was always done better than this. This was "the government says" and the government never says. In the US, we get "Bob on the street says the government says" which is a fact, even if Bob is wrong. America has perfected the art of being 100% wrong without accountability. Anything that drives up paper sales while not opening them up to lawsuits is greatly encouraged, regardless of the truth. Facts and the truth are unrelated in the US.
  • All Lies (Score:3, Interesting)

    by Doc Ruby (173196) on Sunday November 28, 2010 @03:34AM (#34363004) Homepage Journal

    And how much of the rest of the Kuwait Times' stories are also total bullshit that they just printed without spending a dime to see if it was true, or even plausible?

    How much of the rest of the "news"? What an incredible racket to have a business that peddles lies every day, without consequences.

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      How much of the rest of the "news"? What an incredible racket to have a business that peddles lies every day, without consequences.

      Didn't some newspaper editor once say, "If a dog bites a man, that is not news. If a man bites a dog, that is news. If a man doesn't bite a dog . . . invent a story which says he did."

    • by jc42 (318812)

      What an incredible racket to have a business that peddles lies every day, without consequences.

      Yeah, the folks at The Onion [theonion.com] seem to be doing a pretty good job. Maybe the other "news" organizations are simply watching their success, and following in their footsteps.

      And note that The Onion has a long-standing policy of never admitting that they publish parody and satire. They do so despite (or maybe because of) the fact that their stories frequently get quoted as fact.

      For that matter, during the last couple of US elections, surveys repeatedly reported that the best-informed voters were those who watc

    • My first thought was that the ban was real, but _NOW_ it was never real. Once the ban got out and people noticed the dumb, then mouthpiece-of-the-government newspaper of record "discovers" that they didn't do their research and no such ban was ever planned.

      "I must find out where my people are going, so I can run out that way and lead them".

      I would put $10 on the ban having been originally real, but once everything we discussed about it here was discussed about it _everywhere_ someone noticed that it would b

  • by PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) on Sunday November 28, 2010 @04:11AM (#34363068)

    It was interesting that journalists were exempted from the now retracted "ban". Traditionally spooks have used journalism as a cover for their real job. Who else can go snooping around, asking politicians difficult questions? The infamous British spy, Kim Philby ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kim_Philby [wikipedia.org] ) worked for The Economist while stationed in the Middle East. Oh, but he was actually working for the Soviet Union. There must be a "in Soviet Russia, The Economist reporter works for you!" joke in there somewhere.

    Other good covers for "legal" spooks are in embassies. With some silly title like "Under Secretary for Cultural Exchange." A retired spook once commented, "If you want to find a spy, look for someone in the embassy who is much too clever for his job." The office for issuing visas is another good place. Before 9/11, a colleague of mine needed to travel on business to the US. Even though there were no restrictions for his nationality, he went to the US embassy, and applied for a visa anyway. He told me that he was surprised how tough the officer grilled him: "You do not need a visa any more, so why are you applying for one?"

    I laughed my ass off, and then told him that the "embassy official" probably reported to Langley.

    • by QuantumG (50515) *

      It's called "official cover".. those are the spies you send to tell the spies in the other country that you have spies there.

      • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

        by MrQuacker (1938262)
        Yo dawg, I heard you like spying. So we put spies inside your spies, so they can spy you spying the spying spies.

        Oh, and 34" rims.

  • "'American business is under assault from counterfeiters and pirates every day, seven days a week," Seems to me "kuwaittimes.net" needs to be added to the list of 75 domains the US government seized earlier this week.
  • Cue thousands of people who stood screaming on a soapbox before to ... mumble something before scuttling off.

  • Two things:
    1. All public photography is illegal in Kuwait, except for licensed journalists. This includes DSLRs, compacts, camera phones, video, everything.
    2. Kuwait does not publish its laws, has no freedom of information - legally or culturally - and sees no problem at all with lying about what the law is. Like all police states, Kuwait would rather that everyone be guilty of something. Enforcement is completely arbitrary - visiting businessmen (better believe I mean 'men') taking snaps are unlikely to b
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by ColdWetDog (752185)

      Two things:

      1. All public photography is illegal in Kuwait, except for licensed journalists. This includes DSLRs, compacts, camera phones, video, everything.

      Really? [flickr.com]. Kuwait doesn't seem do too well on the enforcement end of things.

      Kuwait does not publish its laws, has no freedom of information - legally or culturally - and sees no problem at all with lying about what the law is. Like all police states, Kuwait would rather that everyone be guilty of something. Enforcement is completely arbitrary - visiting businessmen (better believe I mean 'men') taking snaps are unlikely to be hassled, unless you do something rash like film the slave labour conditions in their foreign-staffed construction sites.

      You might just type a bit [infoprod.co.il] before you rant on... Yes, I am sure that Kuwait does all manner of nasty, underhanded things (rather like some other countries we mention from time to time) but your comments are uselessly hyperbolic.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Voulnet (1630793)
      Where the hell do you bring this bullcrap from? Photography is one of the most spread hobbies in Kuwait, and many competitions and exhibitions are routinely held around Kuwait.
      Don't you feel really sick inside when you deliberately twist all sorts of information just to show your hate to people who didn't do anything to you? What a low life.
      Also, Kuwait publishes its laws, and every additions or modifications to it. In fact it has an official newspaper dedicated to doing just that. Kuwait a police state

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