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What Would You Do With Open.org? 239

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the whats-wrong-with-porn dept.
itwbennett writes "The Linux Fund recently bought the open.org domain at auction for an undisclosed sum. Now begins the challenge of doing something with it — something that generates enough revenue to be self-sustaining."
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What Would You Do With Open.org?

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  • I know! (Score:5, Funny)

    by loftwyr (36717) on Monday February 28, 2011 @10:19AM (#35337990)

    A repository of knock spells? Sure to be a winner!

  • Goatse host (Score:5, Funny)

    by BumbaCLot (472046) on Monday February 28, 2011 @10:21AM (#35338004)

    What is more open than goatse?

  • Step... (Score:3, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday February 28, 2011 @10:22AM (#35338022)

    1. Buy domain
    2. ??
    3. Profit!!

  • Make money? (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday February 28, 2011 @10:23AM (#35338028)

    Porn. no better option.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Monday February 28, 2011 @10:23AM (#35338030)

    Something like the Mac App Store, but cross platform and accepting only open source submissions. Take a 30% cut of paid downloads.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      Apart from the commission, this sounds like Freshmeat, Tucows, or Sourceforge.

      They probably make money off of ad revenue

      • Apart from the commission, this sounds like Freshmeat, Tucows, or Sourceforge.

        They probably make money off of ad revenue

        Uuh...how many 'open source' users do you know that have AdBlock turned off?

    • by SpeZek (970136)
      Good idea, except that the people most likely to use such open-source apps are the same people who are likely to just download the source and compile if binaries aren't available. Where's the profit?
      Plus, we already have sourceforge.
      • by CastrTroy (595695) on Monday February 28, 2011 @11:05AM (#35338510) Homepage
        Maybe I'm not the only one, but while sourceforge/freshmeant/whatever is a good place to find good open source apps, you also have to wade through a pile of garbage to get to them. Maybe open.org could be a place where only the elite apps get shown off, to get across to people that open source software really is amazing, if you ignore all the terrible or half done projects. Sure it's not very "open" but would go a long way to getting the average Joe to using open source software.
        • by OakDragon (885217)
          And I may be in the minority, but I would pay X amount of money for open source and free apps that were compiled and packaged. (X being reasonably small.)
          • by vlm (69642)

            And I may be in the minority, but I would pay X amount of money for open source and free apps that were compiled and packaged. (X being reasonably small.)

            We have had this for decades. No kidding.

            You could hire one of these guys to produce the exact free app that you want, to the exact packaging specs you want, with the exact compile time options you want. You can't lose, and everyone wins. Kind of the opposite of the banking system where heads they win or tails you lose.

            http://www.debian.org/consultants [debian.org]

        • by david.given (6740)

          There used to be a site called sweetcode.org back in 2003 that showcased of interesting open source projects. It ran for a bit and then died; the most recent version is archived here [archive.org]. These days it's a squatter site, worse luck.

          Even now, eight years later, there's some interesting stuff there --- ReVirt, a logging virtual machine that captures the state of the system over time, so if there's an intrusion you can wind back the clock and see how it happened? convertfs, which can convert one filesystem to an

        • by SpeZek (970136)

          Do you really need to wade through garbage at sourceforge? If you want the "elite" apps, then just sort them by popularity/ranking. That's how they would be picked for an "elite" list anyway.

          I will grant that sourceforge's design is absolutely horrible for the masses. However, that necessitates a better design, not an entirely new website.

        • by kent_eh (543303)

          Maybe I'm not the only one, but while sourceforge/freshmeant/whatever is a good place to find good open source apps, you also have to wade through a pile of garbage to get to them. Maybe open.org could be a place where only the elite apps get shown off, to get across to people that open source software really is amazing, if you ignore all the terrible or half done projects. Sure it's not very "open" but would go a long way to getting the average Joe to using open source software.

          So, something like fossfor.us [fossfor.us] then?

    • by Foofoobar (318279) on Monday February 28, 2011 @11:01AM (#35338474)
      Better. Supply open source support for sourceforge/open source projects.

      Allow people to signup (with valid paypal account) and they go into a support pool for open source projects. People who answer questions correctly (or get most points) get most pay while fewer points get a smaller percentage of pay for that question.

      People who wish to pay for support can sign up for an unlimited number of questions or pay per question asked. The amount would be based on each project and the popularity and number of downloads of said project (or something like that). Percentage of pay could also go to maintainers of project.
      • Additionally, you could even charge people a nominal yearly fee for access as what you would be creating is an online knowledge base for support and trouble shooting of just about every open source project in the world. This would be WORTH a monthly/yearly fee and most companies would gladly pay a small 'per license fee' or one lump sum fee just for the support.

        Considering the route Canonical is going, you could easily work out an agreement with them more than likely (as long as they got THEIR cut) and e
        • by Foofoobar (318279)
          Also... this should be obvious but I should point out that such a model could NOT work on a subscription basis of charging a monthly/yearly fee or per license fee up front until AFTER a large enough knowledge base was created first. Then they could change models. This will of course anger alot of people as changing access/charge models like this always does anger people but having created this knowledge base and created the relationship with people who use this as a source of revenue, this will be the numbe
      • by vlm (69642)

        Better. Supply open source support for sourceforge/open source projects.

        Probably a hell of a lot simpler to contact one of these 826 people and arrange terms.

        http://www.debian.org/consultants [debian.org]

        Now something new to the ecosystem, would be a talent agency that handled all aspects of these relationships for a very modest fee. Maybe that already exists, very quietly.

    • Something like the Mac App Store, but cross platform and accepting only open source submissions.

      Then that's absolutely nothing like the Mac App Store.

      • by vlm (69642)

        Something like the Mac App Store, but cross platform and accepting only open source submissions.

        Then that's absolutely nothing like the Mac App Store.

        They mean, it would be shiny.

    • Take a 30% cut of paid downloads.

      That would be a better deal than Ubuntu is offering Banshee
      http://www.zdnet.com/blog/open-source/canonical-banshee-agree-to-disagree/8345 [zdnet.com]

  • If money generation and "open" was to be combined, I'd say P0rn. But in this case, it is a useless contribution from the peanut gallery...
    • The important thing is that money generation and nonprofit don't go hand-in-hand. I would be delighted to hear that it helped the linux foundation enough to be worth the cost. "self sustaining" shouldn't have to be part of that.
  • derp (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday February 28, 2011 @10:24AM (#35338036)

    Shouldnt they have a clue what they will do with the domain before blowing money into the wind?

  • self-sustaining ? (Score:2, Insightful)

    by BisexualPuppy (914772)
    something that generates enough revenue to be self-sustaining

    Like capable of generating $30 per month ? Seems hard.
  • Not just software (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Chuckles08 (1277062) on Monday February 28, 2011 @10:27AM (#35338078)
    It would be great if open.org was a place to find not just software but other types of open source content and resources that could be used creatively with open software. I'm thinking of sites like the Encyclopedia of Life (eol.org), freesound.org, and the like.
    • Re:Not just software (Score:4, Interesting)

      by peterhil (472239) on Monday February 28, 2011 @11:49AM (#35338998) Homepage

      I second this idea, I would like to see it become a useful resource for both users and developers/artists. There could be a directory and a customized search engine pointing to good resources about open source and creative commons materials.

      For developers it could help find libraries with selected license (BSD and MIT like licenses in addition to GPL like), links to free tutorials, books, documentation and interesting projects to collaborate by language, information about different licenses. Also a message board or news section for finding collaborators for and announcing new projects might be useful.

      Wiki works too for a dictionary claryifying some terms about open source, but I think it should just be a part of the site. I see a collectively edited Dmoz or Yahoo style link directory equally useful. For inspiration on making new users for open source software: http://www.opensourcemac.org/ [opensourcemac.org]

      On the software side, there is already Github, Sourceforge and many more, but open.org could provide some visual statistics about most used open source software, most active projects, most liked projects the information being collected from different sites and repository hosts. Github and ohloh.net do a good work of being useful for both developers and users. In my opinion Sourceforge has gone much worse in this respect in the last two versions, unvisionarily mixing the two sides and not catering to either.

      As for the self-sustaining revenue: On the web there's generally four ways to make money:
      Donations, ads, selling some useful items or services and porn.

  • To hell with revenue (Score:5, Interesting)

    by DoktorSeven (628331) on Monday February 28, 2011 @10:28AM (#35338082) Homepage Journal

    Start something that promotes open software, open ideas, and open standards. Take on Microsoft and other companies head on. Show people what quality software and open standards do for everyone.

    That's what I'd do.

    • Don't forget also open source advocacy and marketing materials.

    • by NevarMore (248971)

      Show people what quality software and open standards do for everyone.

      That's what I'd do.

      Who ensures quality? Part of the supposed value in iTunes and Androids marketplace is that the applications are submitted, reviewed, and only added if they are up to snuff. Even with something like Canonicals Ubuntu repositories there is still a bit of junk in there that is easy to install, but hard to make it work and do what it was supposed to do. Theres no easy feedback. A nag screen isn't quite right, but if I remove a package I should be able to say "this was crap" or "didnt meet my needs" and give som

    • Start something that promotes open software, open ideas, and open standards. Take on Microsoft and other companies head on. Show people what quality software and open standards do for everyone.

      That's what I'd do.

      Then maybe actually donate enough money so that it doesn't have to clamber for revenue? It's easy to write Slashdot comments espousing openness while things suffer to due to lack of revenue in the real world.

    • by StikyPad (445176)

      I'm not sure how this idea of free (as in beer) got attached to free (as in speech), but Open Source wasn't envisaged as a necessarily gratis environment like freeware. In fact, the genesis of OSS was the idea that anyone paying for software should receive the source code along with it.

      There's nothing wrong with turning a profit on OSS, and the ecosystem as a whole would probably benefit from something akin to the App Store, where companies and individuals can market their applications. Keep 10% of the pr

  • 1) Buy domain
    2) Ask Slashdot
    3) ...
    4) Profit?

    Maybe they can resell it to someone that actually has a use for it for more than they paid for it? Quids in that way ..

    Essentially the Linux Fund are just domain squatters.

    • by tomhudson (43916) <barbara.hudson@b ... h u d s o n .com> on Monday February 28, 2011 @10:44AM (#35338268) Journal
      Considering that it was already being used for something better than "OGM I can get open.org - what can I do with it?"

      The domain name was recently acquired by Linux Fund from the City of Salem, Oregon for an undisclosed amount. Salem's public library was using the domain for a kids-to-Internet program entitled the Oregon Public Education Network. The Linux Fund purchased the domain at public auction.

      ... maybe they can return it to its original use - but it wasn't just for kids, as you can see if you look at the archives.

      snapshot index from wayback machine [archive.org], from a few years ago [archive.org], the shutting down notification page [archive.org].

      So, why not the Open Public Education Network? It's self-referential, same as Linux Is Not Unix, or Gnu's Not Unux.

      • You fool! By posting those links you've slashdotted history! Who knows what alterations to the time line this will cause? Quick, somebody call a Voyager.
        • by anyGould (1295481)

          You fool! By posting those links you've slashdotted history! Who knows what alterations to the time line this will cause? Quick, somebody call a Voyager.

          Surely you jest - If we're going to screw with time itself, let's do it properly. Where's a TARDIS when you really need one?

          • by Minwee (522556)
            Too late. I already used a time machine to go back in time and register the domain on behalf of the Oregon Public Education Network. History has already been changed, as you can see from the title of this article. It's no longer "Linux Fund Suddenly Remembers Registering Open.org But Doesn't Know What To Do With It", but now something completely different.
  • by louic (1841824) on Monday February 28, 2011 @10:31AM (#35338128)
    A free, open source "app store", of course! A database with open source programs (similar to the Ubuntu Software Centre), but including windows programs. With systems to search for, rate and review open source applications, with screen shots, installation instructions and everything. I cannot think of anything more useful than that. This is easily self-sustaining if they did not spend more than $1000 on the domain. If they did, the best option is to sell it and buy a cheaper domain name.
  • by Dunbal (464142) * on Monday February 28, 2011 @10:31AM (#35338130)
    I would immediately counter by selling close.org.
  • by stox (131684) on Monday February 28, 2011 @10:32AM (#35338142) Homepage

    I own neutrality.org. If any readers would be interested in assisting me in fighting the good fight, please drop me a note at ideas@neutrality.org. My intent is to use this to promote network neutrality, and not to make a quick buck.

    • Please Define "network neutrality" in such a way that I will agree with you. ;)

      My definition would be

      Network Neutrality: Standardized methods of routing and packet prioritization that doesn't favor or disfavor based upon origin or destination, nor giving favor or disfavor for packets to gain an advantage for competing services.

      It is simple, concise and accurate.

      That and Comcast sucks donkey balls. IF I could get DSL to my house, because even though it would be "slower" it would be faster than my Comcast. Or

    • by Compaqt (1758360)

      I didn't realize you could set a "real" domain name to 127.0.0.1

      Very cute.

      • by tomhudson (43916)

        I didn't realize you could set a "real" domain name to 127.0.0.1

        Very cute.

        Try http://www.neutrality.org:8080/ [neutrality.org] - one of the "alternate ports" (along with 8000). Obviously not set up too well, since it requires the www prefix. Traceroute says it's a dsl line with ameritech (SBC).

    • I own newtrally.org. If any readers would be interested in assisting me in all-terrain amphibian racing, please drop me a note at ideas@newtrally.org. My intent is to use this to promote newts rallying, and not to make a quick buck.
      --

  • by suso (153703) * on Monday February 28, 2011 @10:35AM (#35338170) Homepage Journal

    I think there needs to be a fresh new marketing campaign that reintroduces the concept of open source software to people (including the geeks) because it seems that a lot of the efforts have fizzled out or become misunderstood by the latest generation.

    • Agreed 100%. Marketing is the key. You can have the best product in the world, but it will fail if no one knows about it.

      But, whatever they do, it needs to be user friendly. I remember talking with a friend of mine a few years ago about the truly awful documentation in some Linux programs. His response was that there is so much development going on that the programmers don't often stop and write clear manuals. Well, that's not just an annoyance; it's a problem, a damn big one, and I don't think it's go

  • Create a brand (Score:5, Interesting)

    by neokushan (932374) on Monday February 28, 2011 @10:39AM (#35338212)

    Part of the "problem" with open source is that only us geek types give a damn about it. Average joe doesn't care about how "open" what he's buying is, which is why people continue to buy closed systems without a second thought.

    Open.org could be the face of open platforms. Get a nice logo and some sort of catchy slogan "Approved by Open.org - your software, how you want it" or something. So when Microsoft releases a new "open" standard that isn't actually that open, open.org could be the ones fighting to make it as open as possible, supporting a truly open alternative, keeping things that are supposed to be open, but aren't, in check (I'm looking at you, Oracle) and generally educating the masses on why being open is "cool" and why they should care, as well as encouraging companies to open up their products more.

    • Today's Open Source programmers seem to be really smart at marketing, making nice sites and logos and selling the idea. I wrote, and still write, GPL'd software but never really tried to hard to market it having just a CVS database and a page on source forge. All info was in a README.

      Honestly I'm very impressed. Some of the projects look very professional. You go guys, you're making it happen.

    • I like this idea as well. If OSS/FOSS had a "brand" identified with it, it could be much stronger.
    • The Parent has the right idea.

      Also sell Tee shirts, get cool stuff and tell your friends.

      Do not let your friends Drive while intoxicated on non-open software.
    • That'd be cool, except that slogans are annoying. Especially bad slogans. They just sound hokey. From Where do you want to go today? to the Burger King or McDonald's or whatever I like it my way things ... if anything, they make me want to laugh. A trustworthy brand is pretty cool, helpful, and nice to be able to rely on; slogans are something I've never figured out the point of. :)

  • Isn't that what it is all about? Trying to find a community that is dedicated to open source projects and finding out about the projects they are working on? Make it easy to get on their CSV and contribute.
  • copyleft repository (Score:5, Interesting)

    by WiglyWorm (1139035) on Monday February 28, 2011 @10:40AM (#35338218) Homepage

    There are so many OSS/FOSS repositories out there. I'd love to see them help foster the copyleft movement and get a directory of creative commons art, audio, video, and ui elements. It would both benefit Linux itself, and attract high traffic for people looking for stock photos etc. thus, ad revenue.

  • What does "self-sustaining" mean? Obviously, there is the cost of hosting the site and maintaining the domain registration, but that isn't a lot of money. Is $20/month on the conservative side really that hard to get? Recouping the cost of purchasing the website is a different issue, but that money has already been spent.
    • by 1s44c (552956)

      What does "self-sustaining" mean? Obviously, there is the cost of hosting the site and maintaining the domain registration, but that isn't a lot of money. Is $20/month on the conservative side really that hard to get? Recouping the cost of purchasing the website is a different issue, but that money has already been spent.

      In this context "self-sustaining" means able to generate enough income to pay off the huge bank loan involved in buying the domain with enough left over to pay for a few 100K a year salaries for management staff who don't work more than an hour a week. It's a dot-com bubble concept.

  • Solutions Database (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Showered (1443719) on Monday February 28, 2011 @10:45AM (#35338274)

    For individuals or for business, the site could offer alternatives and/or solutions to common problems. It can also promote open standards for others to follow.

    e.g. replacement Office suite = Libre Office, ProTools = Audacity, SAP ERP = OpenTaps, OpenBravo, etc.

    You can setup case studies to advocate the use of open source software and solutions.

    This wouldn't just apply to software. You can also throw in hardware designs too (I'm thinking Arduino stuff).

    A source of income could be companies that advertise on the site, offering their expertise in setting up open source business systems.

    • ProTools = Audacity

      No.

      I've used Audacity. It's great for quick and dirty audio editing and the price is right. It's not a replacement for ProTools.

      That said, the number of people who actually need the features in ProTools that Audacity doesn't have is really miniscule. Maybe that's what you were getting at.

  • ...Said somewhat tongue-in-cheek, but also seriously: turn it into a one-stop-shop for all things FSF/Open source, etc., that users can just get, a la the Android and Apple app stores. Such an app store would include things like Blender, GCC, LibreOffice, Linux itself (multiple flavors), all the way down to code files.

    The store could be configured so that it would be easy to donate to the projects, even if you don't actually download the program, with them taking a small cut (a la the Apple app store) to pr

  • I'd turn it into an opensource 'App Store' that catalogs opensource software, provides downloads for all platforms, source and documentation, as well as interactive help wikis or other sorts of user-generated docs and troubleshooting help. Add a search engine or mechanism that lets folks put in the name of closed-source software they wish to substitute and have it come up with a list of well-supported opensource alternatives.

    Or, sell it to American Express for a healthy profit and use the proceeds to fund

  • with easy to read descriptions, synopsis, details & instructions and links to the various author's website & repositories...
  • Open Philosophy (Score:3, Interesting)

    by mfh (56) on Monday February 28, 2011 @11:03AM (#35338486) Homepage Journal

    Construct the Open Manifesto.

    Open government, open code -- open philosophy.

    Open honesty between all humans. Truth: you are all bags of carbon and mostly water.

    Reality: We need to become completely open if we hope to achieve a successful deep space program with multigenerational stability, and save our species from extinction, which will happen unless we all work together towards a multigenerational goal of continuing the species.

    Governments are corrupt. Politicians lie to get votes, even good ones. That can't be allowed anywhere for the open philosophy to prevail.

    We must hunt down and expose all those who wish to hide secrets. Off with their heads! (I mean: revoke their parking pass for a week).

    • Yes, what mfh said. Well, don't call it a 'manifesto', but showcase all the great things going on that benefit from openness. And then use that to sell open source software.

      You want to associate open source with other open successes. And honor and praise the victories as they happen.

      But, really, I don't know what open.org sold for, but putting one guy on it for one day a week isn't going to be worth that investment. Consider at least a staff of three full-timers. I suppose this means advertising, but

  • Employment Agency (Score:4, Interesting)

    by lymond01 (314120) on Monday February 28, 2011 @11:04AM (#35338500)

    A single site to register open source software developers. It would work like a temp agency -- you pay the developer $30/hour, the hiring company pays you $45/hour. There may be something else out there but it would be nice to have a central community for hiring experts on Plone, Python, Drupal, Graphic Design, MySQL, Postgres, etc. Something that showcases their resumes, portfolio, photos of their mom's basement, etc.

  • Shirts, hats, bumper stickers, etc, etc, etc....as well as a good central place to download all of the major F/OSS operating systems.
  • A wiki about open source software that can be easily searched. I was looking for a GUI networking utility and there isn't a well organized list of F/OSS anywhere. A place where articles on old software aren't deleted!
  • by Lumpy (12016) on Monday February 28, 2011 @11:29AM (#35338762) Homepage

    A list of all the companies that support open standards and are heros of freedom and democracy.

    and a list of all the closed and abusive standards and the companies that force them upon society, exposing them as the terrorists and haters of humanity they are.

  • by tsa (15680) on Monday February 28, 2011 @11:46AM (#35338956) Homepage

    Make a database on it containing all open standards, like pdf, odf, HTML, etc. But not OOXML. I bet even MS will not ask to have it on there.

  • There is an easy answer to that one. I'd sell it to whoever is willing to pay the most, it really doesn't have any other value.

    The Linux Fund, whoever they are, seem to be pushing some angle to try and extract cash out of words like 'Linux' and 'Open'. I don't see them being trustworthy somehow.

  • by MaWeiTao (908546) on Monday February 28, 2011 @11:49AM (#35338996)

    Use it to market the value of open source. Perhaps feature a whole section with tips on switching and cover the basic challenges a user might face. A resource where new users aren't going to be judged for their ignorance about Linux.

    A domain like this shouldn't be wasted catering to a community already sold on the concept.

  • Make open.org the face of a new international standards body that vets completely open standards - i.e. ones that are not patent encumbered and can be implemented for any purpose royalty free. It can work in a similar way to ISO, requiring prior approval of the standards by some other body, and just putting a stamp on them saying 'this is an open standard'. It should campaign for recognition by governments, so that any spec that it publishes has a one year draft period, and any patents that are not disclo
  • by miruku (642921) on Monday February 28, 2011 @12:52PM (#35339678) Homepage

    Make a site that is a great resource to all things Open. Not just software or hardware, but open culture, architecture, design, access, etc. Be educational yet very handy so as to better inform and enthuse users as to what communities and resources are out there and how they can participate, either globally or locally. Be a hub site to help join the dots and frame how fantastic the idea of Open is.

  • How much would you pay for a username@open.org email address? I wanna be first in line to register my username "wide"!
  • What Would You Do With Open.org?
    I would put it in a blendtec with some ice, a banana and some yogurt and make a smoothie.
  • by MagicM (85041)

    OMG Ponies Everywhere Now!

  • ...with open.org?

    Porn. Naturally.

  • by meustrus (1588597) <{meustrus} {at} {gmail.com}> on Monday February 28, 2011 @05:29PM (#35342164)

    Before you read what I would do, I want to state that openness, to me, does not just mean open source. Openness is a moral value. Openness in its best form is absolute honesty, with your users and your administrators, with your friends and family. Openness in its worst form is Wikileaks (which I don't think is a bad thing), or in another word, controversial. When software is open, it is open to change, it is open to criticism, it is open to becoming better than it is, and it is open to others' differences. When a person is open, that person has the same qualities.

    The open source community is intelligent and idealistic. It is also fragmented and childish. A central domain like Open.org is the perfect place to bring people together in such a way as to establish openness as a strong moral value with a strong cultural backing. If I were to do something with Open.org, and I were a large organization that could pull this off, here's what I would do:

    1. Start with an open source website framework, like Rails, or a powerful CMS, like Drupal. The idea is to get something that's stable and can do anything and expand easily, so no Wordpress etc. Be careful that the software isn't going to cause bickering later on; it should perform so excellently that nobody can reasonably take issue with it.
    2. Make a gorgeous Web 3.0 - looking website template to be the face of the openness movement.
    3. Start out as a Digg/StackOverflow style content rating system. Rate lots of stuff, like news related to openness or open source software packages.
    4. Let users build up their credit. Users could have very visible blogs that can be rated and pushed to the front page.
    5. Build the community over time. Extend tendrils across the internet, with links everywhere a la Facebook.
    6. Create sub-communities of the larger community, like small villages that come together to form a province. Large communities are impersonal, and often showcase the worst of the internet, while smaller communities can be genuine fun to be a part of.
    7. Collaborate on a group culture, a la Wikipedia rules (early Wikipedia, not the elitist stuff I'm to understand they do lately)
    8. Extend this culture into the world. Get people to be open in their daily lives, and to show others what openness means. Show others why it's important to be open.

    I just hope that this comment isn't lost under 200 other comments on Slashdot. I am a web developer and I would be willing to help make this a reality.

  • by naich (781425) on Tuesday March 01, 2011 @03:25AM (#35345740) Homepage

    So was it purchased at a public auction or for an undisclosed amount? Unless you have some weird auctions in Oregon it would be difficult not to disclose the amount.

You had mail, but the super-user read it, and deleted it!

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