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Intel Open Source Software

Intel Joins LibreOffice 176

Posted by timothy
from the hardware-more-useful-with-software dept.
New submitter dgharmon writes "The month of February is a month to remember for the LibreOffice project. They formally incorporated the foundation in Berlin, released 3.5 with major changes and now Intel is joining the foundation as a member. Intel will also make available the LibreOffice for Windows from SUSE in Intel AppUp center. Intel AppUp Center is an online repository designed for Intel processor-based devices."
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Intel Joins LibreOffice

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  • windows only app up (Score:5, Informative)

    by vlm (69642) on Sunday February 26, 2012 @07:00PM (#39167219)

    Intel AppUp Center is an online repository designed for Intel processor-based devices.

    Minor correction; its a windows only app store. Does not perform the miracle of running the same executable on mac osx, all linux distros, and windows. Just windows thats all.

    libreoffice is available for all those platforms, just not available on the windows only appup

      • by rubycodez (864176) on Sunday February 26, 2012 @07:47PM (#39167541)
        I don't know anyone that runs that shit, my windows loving and windows certified engineer friends couldn't get off that crap to win 7 fast enough. I have banking clients that standardized on vista long-term as part of their strategic plan, and made the unprecedented step of taking the effort to recertify all the apps for win 7, the vista suckage was so very hard and deep
        • by Maow (620678)

          I don't know anyone that runs that shit, my windows loving and windows certified engineer friends couldn't get off that crap to win 7 fast enough. I have banking clients that standardized on vista long-term as part of their strategic plan, and made the unprecedented step of taking the effort to recertify all the apps for win 7, the vista suckage was so very hard and deep

          My then-new PC came with Vista and yes, the suckage was intense. But SP1 fixed all that, made it workable.

          I still switched to Linux at that time, haven't gone back. Have played with Win7 in a VirtualBox and it feels just like Vista, maybe SP2.

          So what is it that makes 7 superior to Vista? The joke at the time was 7 was just a new service pack on Vista, and that's very likely true considering how long it took for Vista to be prepared for general release.

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by hairyfeet (841228)

      It is also included with AMD netbooks so its not Intel only either as it came with my EEE 1215B. its not bad but I have a question: Dear Linux community, you guys WANT to gain share...right? You WANT people to actually use Linux, to spread the wealth of FOSS software, to have more and more people have real choices...yes? Am I right?

      Then why in the hell are you not getting behind ExpressGate/Splashtop? Its fucking brilliant! The most innovative thing I've seen come from FOSS and you are just ignoring it? WTF

      • by icebraining (1313345) on Sunday February 26, 2012 @08:43PM (#39167891) Homepage

        Dear Linux community, you guys WANT to gain share...right? You WANT people to actually use Linux, to spread the wealth of FOSS software, to have more and more people have real choices...yes? Am I right?

        As a Linux user speaking for nobody else, no, I don't really care.

        As for EG, I've never used it, but I do study in a place where all machines dual-boot Windows and Linux, and despite the Linux distro booting much faster and actually having more applications (which users can't run on Windows, since it's pretty locked down), I've never seen anyone choose Linux unless by mistake, and even those proceeded to reboot the machine.

        • The use case for express gate isn't for people who want to sit down and work the whole day on mimcrosoft office.

          The use case for express gate is :
          - to quickly check emails / facebook / etc. (thanks to the ultra fast boot time and the built-in browser. You can turn-on, check what you want and more, and turn off, for the same time it takes to get windows out of hibernation)
          - to use the laptop as a glorified media player (it's been available in BIOSes since the begining of CD-ROM. Now you just have a linux env

          • You don't get it. At least half of the users go to those machines exactly for that use case: check webmail, facebook, maybe do a search. They still load Windows every time and they still reboot to Windows if they mistakenly choose Linux.

            Windows is familiar, Linux isn't.

            • by vlm (69642)

              Windows is familiar, Linux isn't.

              Windows used to be familiar. The difference between the last decade or so of windows UIs is ... immense

      • by eldorel (828471) on Sunday February 26, 2012 @09:06PM (#39168017)
        Why is the linux community ignoring Expressgate?

        It can be difficult to update (bios/firware update?)
        It can't be used on different systems. (I want my laptop and desktop and netbook to at least be similar systems.)
        It is "customized" by the oem. (yay, another sybian/andriod style compatibility/UI nightmare)
        It can't be easily backed up by an end user.
        It is yet another layer of crap to break.
        It has a tiny list of available software that has to be installed via an "app store".
        It's virtually impossible to for an end user to know exactly what it is running behind the UI.

        Additionally, On the laptops I've seen it on, it doesn't actually access 90% of the hardware (Usb-wifi/3d graphics/printer/scanner ?), and if I remember correctly is actually a locked efi partition with hooks directly into the bios.

        That's why I'm ignoring it personally.

        Now, if they can get it to be a fully featured os frontend for linux without the hardware dependent crap, maybe it could gain traction as a window manager instead of being just another piece of crappy bloatware that I uninstall.

        There are two simple reasons that expressgate appears to work so well.
        1) it only uses the hardware that is part of the motherboard. (see apple for how this works)
        2) It's limited to only 3 or 4 activities and a few simple games.

        Anyone (and everyone) can build a locked down device that plays music, surfs the web, and can play a few games on very specific hardware. (look at every handheld console in the last 4 years along with the entire smartphone/tablet market).

        The entire point of a generic PC operating system is flexibility.
        The single common thread with almost every successful linux distribution is the idea that the USER SHOULD HAVE A CHOICE.
        Almost every single linux user I know of lists "the freedom to change things to work the way I like" as a primary motivation for switching.
        "I can continue to use my $(unusual hardware peripheral)" is also right up there in the top 10 reasons.

        If you don't need the ability to adapt to new requirements or to add completely new software/hardware then why are you buying a PC?
        Go get a tablet, an hdmi monitor, and a bluetooth keyboard, just like my grandmother.
      • How many people go out of their way to buy a custom motherboard vs. some OEM prefab machine? Of those, how many are going to follow such a niche as Splashtop (let alone understand it)? Where exactly is the motivation (financial or otherwise)?
      • by MrEricSir (398214)

        ow you push the Windows button you are looking at a bare minimum 45 seconds and that is if you used hibernate, with EG? 6 seconds cold boot. Now lets talk battery life, Win 7 HP X64 gets right at 6 hours on my 6 cell, if I use Brazos tweaker to lower the voltage I can squeeze it to 6:45, now how does that compare to EG? Over 7 hours with no tweaking. Now lets talk intuitive, if you know Windows you know Win 7, the search box is a big help but otherwise it hasn't really changed much. EG has a top row of tabs

      • by gtall (79522)

        Suppose you are an OEM. People buy your box because it runs winders. Offering Expressgate, et.al. increases the number of things that can go wrong, and also need to be supported. For what precisely? The 'precisely' bit is important, without an accurate gauge of what it will do for the OEM's bottom line, they won't touch it.

      • by jonadab (583620)
        > Dear Linux community, you guys WANT to gain share...right? You WANT people to actually use Linux

        Sure. I mean, not EVERYONE (replacing one monopoly with another is seldom a significant long-term improvement), but I definitely want *some* people to use it.

        > Then why in the hell are you not getting behind ExpressGate/Splashtop?

        Three reasons. 1. This is the first I've ever heard of either ExpressGate or Splashtop. 2. After bouncing around from distro to distro for a good while (including FreeBSD fo
    • by fred911 (83970)

      Intel AppUp center is an ...

      A bloated front end for ftp://intel.com/pub/win [intel.com] .

  • Aren't most of the paid OpenOffice developers Oracle employees? I'm talking about the Star Office guys. Does LibreOffice have the same development manpower behind it?

    • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday February 26, 2012 @07:23PM (#39167373)

      The Document Foundation has a really nice graphics explaining who does which work:
      http://blog.documentfoundation.org/2012/02/02/fosdem-preview/
      Looks like other companies plus volunteers are adding much more to LibreOffice now than Oracle contributed to OpenOffice.

    • by RubberMallet (2499906) on Monday February 27, 2012 @03:58AM (#39169981)

      Not anymore. You REALLY are behind the times. Oracle dropped OpenOffice.org and StarOffice in the middle of April 2011. They put the entire staff of the Hamburg Germany office (where 99% of the paid OOo developers worked) on paid leave until they sorted out the layoffs. The layoffs officially started around September 2011.

      During that same period, Oracle worked with the Apache Foundation to turn over the stewardship of OOo to Apache.... this has... not gone so well... mainly because almost all of the developers, previously paid and otherwise left to go work on LibreOffice. OOo development has stalled and stagnated, while LibreOffice development is going on at a rate that is far above what it saw when Sun was controlling things.

      As of now, there are zero paid OOo developers in the same sense as there were during the period when Sun Microsystems was around. There are a few people (like IBM employees) who are paid to work on OOo, but it's very minimal compared to how it was between 2000 and 2010.

      • by TheRaven64 (641858) on Monday February 27, 2012 @07:33AM (#39170865) Journal
        Oracle's mismanagement seems to have been good for a few projects. Both Solaris^WIllumos and Open^WLibreOffice have benefitted from the fact that there were briefly a lot of unemployed developers with experience with the codebase. Other companies snapped them up pretty quickly, and now neither project is controlled by a single organisation, making it easier to encourage new developers. When Sun employed 90% of the people with Solaris kernel experience, no one wanted to be a junior partner. When 70% of them quit in protest over Oracle's open source strategy, it became a lot more interesting because now they're scattered over half a dozen companies with no single corporation dictating strategy.
  • LibreOffice! (Score:3, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward on Sunday February 26, 2012 @07:13PM (#39167303)

    FTW!

    (fuck Oracle)

  • If I were a cynical guy I'd take this as Intel giving Microsoft's cash cow the FU salute after Microsoft said Windows 8 would run on Arm based tablets. Good thing I'm not a cynical person - oh, wait...

    • by causality (777677)

      If I were a cynical guy I'd take this as Intel giving Microsoft's cash cow the FU salute after Microsoft said Windows 8 would run on Arm based tablets. Good thing I'm not a cynical person - oh, wait...

      Assuming that many people are petty and vindictive is not cynicism, it's realism, so long as you remain open to any exceptions you should encounter.

      Having said that, if your suspicion is correct and Microsoft is on the receiving end of some corporate vindictiveness, well, it couldn't have happened to a better company. They may be tame these days as they slide towards irrelevancy, but they also have 25 years of bad karma to catch up with.

    • by symbolset (646467) *
      On a related note, Intel's first smartphone [techcrunch.com] runs... Android. Apparently Intel has finally got the memo. I wish them luck.
      • Not much surprise there. Intel contribute a lot of development effort to Linux. Android is the marketing name of a customised version of Java on Linux. Should not be a surprise that Intel went down this road. You are right, this is a good thing and I also hope they are successful with it.
        • by symbolset (646467) * on Sunday February 26, 2012 @10:37PM (#39168483) Journal

          Not much surprise there. Intel contribute a lot of development effort to Linux. Android is the marketing name of a customised version of Java on Linux. Should not be a surprise that Intel went down this road. You are right, this is a good thing and I also hope they are successful with it.

          Android is not "a customized version of Java". Please avoid confusing people with this phrasing as Java is a trademark owned by Oracle and Oracle is trying to say that Android is Java when it's not so as to get billions of dollars out of Google and incidentally kill Android. The word "Java" by itself is taken to mean an operating environment similar to the Android operating environment, but they are separately sourced and not the same thing.

          Android is an operating system that uses the Linux kernel. It uses a virtual machine system called Dalvik which is incompatible with Java virtual machines and bytecode applications. Android runs programs typically written in the Java Programming Language (the free language specification, not the copyrighted operating environment) but these programs are compiled to Java operating environment-incompatible Davik bytecode and linked to non-Java Android libraries. Android uses certain public Application Programming Interfaces in common with Java, for the convenience and familiarity of developers.

          Android also runs native applications written in C, C++ and a number of other programming languages linked both against the Android libraries and other development libraries in the "Native Development Kit". Android has some similarities to Java, as Linux has some similarities to Unix - but Android is not, has never been, and will never be "Java" any more than Linux has ever been or ever will be "Unix".

  • Actual press release (Score:5, Informative)

    by Zarmvenius (321933) on Sunday February 26, 2012 @09:00PM (#39167981) Homepage

    Here's the actual Document Foundation press release, without the adverts and typos:
    http://blog.documentfoundation.org/2012/02/23/the-document-foundation-announces-libreoffice-for-windows-from-suse-is-now-available-in-intel-appupsm-center/

  • by Strange Attractor (18957) on Sunday February 26, 2012 @10:41PM (#39168499) Homepage

    I've been watching Intel since the 1970's, and I've been impressed with their technical skill and business judgment. I didn't like what the Wintel duopoly did for computing/science/culture, but it made Intel rich. When Andy Grove canned employees at Intel Supercomputing for using Apples, I took it to mean that he believed that his company's future was tied to Microsoft.

    Do you think the decision to join LibreOffice was made at the highest level at Intel? If so, I think it is an important shift.

    • by Osgeld (1900440)

      if you have been really watching intel since the 70's you would know that the wintel duopoly did not kick into full effect until the mid 90's which was promptly greeted by competitors

  • by TheNinjaroach (878876) on Monday February 27, 2012 @11:03AM (#39172501)

    Intel will also make available the LibreOffice for Windows from SUSE in Intel AppUp center.

    There are a few too many proper nouns for this sentence to make any sense.

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