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Google Unifies Media, Apps Into Google Play 146

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the enslavement-was-never-so-much-fun dept.
eldavojohn writes "Google has just announced Google Play to merge their existing solutions for music, movies, books and apps in the new cloud based storage system promising that you will never have to worry about losing or moving them across devices ever again. You'll be able to store 20,000 songs for free. The region breakdown is: 'In the U.S., music, movies, books and Android apps are available in Google Play. In Canada and the U.K., we'll offer movies, books and Android apps; in Australia, books and apps; and in Japan, movies and apps. Everywhere else, Google Play will be the new home for Android apps.'"
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Google Unifies Media, Apps Into Google Play

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  • by gl4ss (559668) on Tuesday March 06, 2012 @03:59PM (#39266407) Homepage Journal

    I don't want my cloud provider to know type of media that's on there - if they know they'll pull it down at request or in case of apps possibly if the publisher just doesn't renew.

    also a little birdie told me thet bitcasa beta is open.

  • Some background (Score:5, Informative)

    by DeathFromSomewhere (940915) on Tuesday March 06, 2012 @04:01PM (#39266447)
    It's worth pointing out that all of this functionality is already available. There is nothing new here except the name and an icon. Not even an interface change. Much ado about nothing.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday March 06, 2012 @04:18PM (#39266629)

    Actually, the "cloud" experience on Android was there long before Apple. Buy an Android phone, insert your google account, and a few moments later you have all your contacts, calendars and apps.

    Thats funny because the original iPhone did that too

  • Re:WHY? (Score:3, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday March 06, 2012 @04:25PM (#39266709)

    Each of these industries are entrenched in more than a hundred years of business law and protect their regional fiefdoms viciously. They do so because they all know the internet makes them completely obsolete. They know that without the anchor of a physical pretense some small company anywhere in the world can beat them.

  • by Cyberllama (113628) on Tuesday March 06, 2012 @04:50PM (#39267049)

    Yes, but that's hardly the same thing. It did that by getting them from the corresponding apps on your Mac when you synced the phone. It didn't pull them out of thin air, which is what "Cloud" is all about. It also didn't work unless you had a Mac. You used to need a computer to make your smartphone work. Now the Smarthphone IS the computer--or it least it can be if you're the minimalist sort.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday March 06, 2012 @04:50PM (#39267059)

    SHENANIGANS!

    The original iphone 2G required you to connect it to itunes to
    #1) activate (couldn't get past lock screen without initial itunes activation)
    #2) sync contacts/calendar/photos/music etc. etc.

    The cloud functionality for ios came MUCH later (measured in years)!

    In contrast, my first android handset pretty much *never* touched a computer USB port.

  • Then go with a zero-knowledge provider like SpiderOak [spideroak.com]. All of the data is encrypted on their servers. Your password is encrypted before it even leaves your computer. (If you lose your password, your recovery option is "I'm fucked".)

    Moreover, even if the feds came knocking on their door, all they could say is that you have x gigs of data on this particular server. The company can't even view your files, no matter how much they (or law enforcement, or a court) might want to.

  • by rsborg (111459) on Tuesday March 06, 2012 @05:12PM (#39267319) Homepage

    really? a windows user with an iPhone would have all their contacts synced with the iPhone?

    As of iOS 2.0, yes. Using either CalDav+IMAP or Exchange ActiveSync you could sync your calendar and email fine with an original iPhone in 2008.

  • by Americano (920576) on Tuesday March 06, 2012 @05:30PM (#39267521)

    No, they sued Amazon for trademark infringement when Amazon opened the Android Appstore, claiming that "App Store" was trademarked by Apple, and complaining that Amazon's use of the mark was infringing.

    There was no patent on "having an electronic store." There was no suit over "having an electronic store." It was a trademark dispute, in which Apple basically said "They should have to call it something else without using the phrase "App Store." Amazon went live with their Android Appstore anyway, and Microsoft has also filed a challenge on the trademark, claiming it was too generic to be a legitimate trademark.

    The most recent I've heard, a few months back, the case is still working it's way through the federal courts.

    Silly lawsuit? Probably. But the USPTO granted them the trademark in the first place, so I'm inclined to believe that the USPTO deserves a fair share of the blame for the waste of the lawsuit, also.

  • Re:WHY? (Score:4, Informative)

    by rsborg (111459) on Tuesday March 06, 2012 @06:23PM (#39268083) Homepage

    Each of these industries are entrenched in more than a hundred years of business law and protect their regional fiefdoms viciously. They do so because they all know the internet makes them completely obsolete. They know that without the anchor of a physical pretense some small company anywhere in the world can beat them.

    Yet, with Apple, you can do all of this and more with iCloud + iTunes Match in 19+ countries. What it means is that Apple figured out there is no winning against the MAFIAA, and have paid their cut. Google is slowly starting to get with the program.

    It's unfortunate, but it does appear that the media industry is going to win vs. the internet by balkanizing or eliminating it entirely.

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