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Music Open Source News

MusOpen Releases Open Source Classical Music As Pro Tools Files 83

Posted by timothy
from the now-it's-yours dept.
VVrath writes "Following Tuesday's story about MuseScore releasing its open source recording of the Goldberg Variations, the Musopen project has released ProTools files from its open source recording project. The final edited recordings are still being worked on but it seems we're living in very interesting times regarding open source classical music."
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MusOpen Releases Open Source Classical Music As Pro Tools Files

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  • by Hatta (162192) on Thursday May 31, 2012 @03:34PM (#40171263) Journal

    What open source software reads Protools files?

    • by VVrath (542962)

      Given that ProTools projects aren't containers (they merely link directly to PCM WAV files), pretty much any Open Source audio editing tool will read these files.

      • by Anonymous Coward

        Sure, any tool will read the audio files, but not necessarily the project files (mixdown, effects, layout, etc.) and that's kind of the whole point.

        • by VVrath (542962)

          True, but as the raw audio files are available there's nothing stopping any suitably talented person from creating their own edit/mix in the software of their choice.

          I've spent the last half hour having lots of fun playing with the recordings of the Egmont Overture in Audacity. Sadly I'm no audio engineer...

        • Exactly.
        • by Anonymous Coward

          My friend and I were just discussing this very thing last night over beer. There needs to be an open source multitrack audio container format that supports DAW settings and operations. I suggested he talk to the engineers at Reaper

          http://reaper.fm/ [reaper.fm]

          and CC the archivists at the Internet Archive

          http://archive.org/details/audio [archive.org]

          • by VVrath (542962)

            OMF [wikipedia.org] is a rudimentary version of that. There are successor formats (e.g AAF MXF) but they don't seem as widely supported.

        • There's nothing useful in the project files yet (as evidenced by the fact that the person doing the editing is not using them), this is just the raw recordings. The actual editing is being done in Logic Pro, these are only available in case you want to do your own.

    • None.
  • Is this like sweet and sour? Oil and vinegar...

  • I was wondering if the Open Source analogy is correct and then I had this idea.

    If we're talking about free collaboration, which is what Open Source is supposed to mean (rather than copyright-less or public domain works) then could we have say an entire orchestral piece played one instrument at a time by individual musicians. When you put all the tracks together, excluding weaker performances and always including stronger performances (based on individual tastes, of course) then... isn't this the ideal Open

    • by EvanED (569694)

      I've wondered about this, and I don't know. My guess is that it would give a result that's better than mediocre orchestras but not as good as a top tier orchestra, but that's just a guess.

      The problem is that if you record instrument-by-instrument you lose a lot of feedback in terms of how to balance different volumes and sounds and articulations and stuff like that. And the problem would become even worse if you just passed out sheet music and a click track and said "go record this" because then you're losi

      • by Kylon99 (2430624)

        I was just thinking about this problem too. And I think the solution is that the 'Conductor' would also be one of the 'pieces' that are required to put together the entire ensemble. This would essentially be the framework with which all the other performances can time themselves to; by watching a video of the conductor at work.

        Now this would be a bit harder than real conducting; either the conductor would have to listen to another performance and 'conduct' or conduct while imagining the music. The video

  • What is the definition of "Classical" music? I thought that the works composed by Bach, Beethoven, Mozart and so on were out of copyright anyway..
    If somebody composes something nowdays can it be still called "Classical" ?

    I can understand that other genres of music can change over time (Like Pop , Rock and Country) but I thought that "Classical" was a period definition.

    Heres a car analogy - a car manufactured on or before 1918 is defined as a "veteran" and from 1919 to 1930 is "Vintage"

    • by VVrath (542962)

      The pieces are out of copyright, but (until now) there weren't any copyright free recordings of performances of these works.

      Regarding musical periods, "classical" was me playing a bit fast-and-loose: Bach was a late Baroque composer, Beethoven is arguably Late Classical/Early Romantic. Still I bet you'd find their work in the classical section in your local record store.

      • by cayenne8 (626475)
        Ok...lets hurry with the classical stuff, and get to open source versions of stuff that matter...blues rock...!!!

        :)

    • by jonbryce (703250) on Thursday May 31, 2012 @04:01PM (#40171719) Homepage

      The strict definition of "Classical" music is music produced between 1750 and 1820. That includes Mozart. Bach is in the "Baroque" period - 1600-1750, and Beethoven (certainly his later works) is in the "Romantic" period 1820-1910. A slightly looser definition of Classical includes all three.

      • Beethoven belongs firmly to the "classical" style, including his later works. There is no way you can include him with the romantics. Schubert is the first "romantic," though still with one foot in the classical style.
    • by CanHasDIY (1672858) on Thursday May 31, 2012 @04:02PM (#40171741) Homepage Journal

      What is the definition of "Classical" music?

      There are actually 2 -

      classical music
      noun

      1. Serious or conventional music following long-established principles rather than a folk, jazz, or popular tradition

      2. (more specifically) Music written in the European tradition during a period lasting approximately from 1750 to 1830, when forms such as the symphony, concerto, and sonata were standardized.

      • by adavies42 (746183)

        iirc definition 2 was originally supposed to relate to "classical" in its primary definition of the time--"relating to Classical Civilization", i.e. ancient greece and rome (cf. classical architecture). i think the idea was that this music was a simplification from the baroque period that preceded it.

    • by dkleinsc (563838)

      As someone who's written what's sometimes called "Classical" music, here's the complexity of it:
      1. As sibling posters have pointed out, it strictly speaking means basically music produced in and around the 1700's.
      2. Another definition would be more cultural: Classical music is the stuff where if performed live by professionals, they'll be wearing tuxes or elegant dresses and using primarily acoustic instruments, possibly with a guy in front waving his arms around but not performing. There's a strong tendenc

    • by adavies42 (746183)

      What is the definition of "Classical" music? I thought that the works composed by Bach, Beethoven, Mozart and so on were out of copyright anyway.

      the problem is that the vast majority of recordings of classical music are under copyright (to the orchestra or whatever). anything old enough to be public domain by sheer age is going to sound terrible (mono 78s at best, and almost certainly recorded "acoustically" through a horn) and there's not going to be much because of the format limitations of the time. (10-inch 78s hold 3min a side, that's about right for a piano etude. hard to put a symphony on those....)

      there's a similar issue actually with sheet

      • by EvanED (569694)

        there's a similar issue actually with sheet music--most of the good sheet music for those same pieces is under some degree of copyright control. i wonder if anyone's looking at doing the same thing there? you could transcribe whole swaths of the canon to MusicXML or ABC and release them under CC-SA or GFDL pretty cheaply, i'd think.

        There is a very large collection of scans of existing pieces at the International Music Score Library Project [imslp.org]. The Mutopia Project [mutopiaproject.org] has a relatively small collection of scores, bu

      • In addition to what EvanED listed, the same people doing these recordings are doing scores as well. [musopen.org]

    • What is the definition of "Classical" music? I thought that the works composed by Bach, Beethoven, Mozart and so on were out of copyright anyway.. If somebody composes something nowdays can it be still called "Classical" ?

      Yes. Composers like Maurice Durufle are considered 20th century classical, which is often characterized by the tasteful use of discord, not so commonly found in early classical. Check out Durufle's Requiem, an extremely difficult choral piece. A 21st century classical style has not formed yet to my knowledge, but there are many classical composers still at it, many working on film and stage soundtracks, John Williams among the more notable.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    My grandmother purchased an antiquated upright baby-grand piano for my sister and I to learn to read/play music with. Pretty sure it cost more than ProTools.

    Music requires instrumentation. Be it as simple and free as a human voice, or as complex and closed as a Stradivarius. Complaining about the cost of a specific piece of equipment seems disingenuous.

    If you don't like the cost/quality of the equipment known as ProTools you're free, as in beer, to whistle Dixie. Assuming you were born with a pair of lips a

    • by Jeng (926980)

      I can't whistle =(

    • My grandmother purchased an antiquated upright baby-grand piano for my sister and I to learn to read/play music with.

      There is no such thing as an "upright-grand" piano, baby or otherwise. The action (i.e., key/lever mechanism) hammer directions and string orientations are completely different on an upright and a grand. These differences create a distinct experience when playing and pedaling them. They're both good, although IMHO a grand is better. Of course, the "best" piano is the one that is available when you need it. :-)

      Sorry ... I'm sure that you and your sister learned a lot with that piano and enjoyed it. But

  • The last I heard the new version won't work with old hardware. Nice. Spent $20k on a system three years ago, and now it's $20k of JUNK if I want to use the new features of the new software. Dear Avid: Fuck. You.
    • by pinkj (521155)

      The last I heard the new version won't work with old hardware. Nice. Spent $20k on a system three years ago, and now it's $20k of JUNK if I want to use the new features of the new software. Dear Avid: Fuck. You.

      Not true. We're using an 888/24 interface with ProTools 10.2 in our studio and it works fine. Avid simply doesn't help you with the hardware if you're having trouble with it which is a little disheartening, but there are a large number of Pro Tools users on a number of forums who will help. Just because they say they don't support a piece of hardware it doesn't mean that it doesn't work. Plus, since Pro Tools 9, you can finally use practically any non-Digidesign/non-Avid audio interface; even your inter

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