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Google Releases Android 4.1 Source Code 211

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the getting-better-each-time dept.

Unlike previous releases, where months passed between Google announcing a new version and the code being released, Google has made good on their promise to release the source code to Jelly Bean in record time. Unfortunately, the gitweb instance on kernel.org is still down so you'll have to download the entire thing to take a peek. Hopefully the Cyanogenmod team will find time to start on a community enhanced version soon.

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Google Releases Android 4.1 Source Code

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  • by oakgrove (845019) on Monday July 09, 2012 @10:34PM (#40598803)
    CM9 has that option so I would imagine CM10 will have it as well. You can also add a persistent Search button on the bottom if that's your thing. Not that you'll need it with the up gesture on Jelly Bean for Google Now.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday July 10, 2012 @12:44AM (#40599375)

    http://android-developers.blogspot.com/2012/01/say-goodbye-to-menu-button.html

  • by oakgrove (845019) on Tuesday July 10, 2012 @01:14AM (#40599509)
    That depends on your device. Get an officially supported by AOSP device like the Nexus or WiFi Xoom and you're golden. Otherwise you takes your chances.
  • by gparent (1242548) on Tuesday July 10, 2012 @01:35AM (#40599599)

    The binaries for the Nexus S and Xoom are not available yet and won't be until the OTA update.

    I tried compiling AOSP with android 4.1.1r1 checked out, adding the 4.0.4 vendor proprietary files, putting it on my phone, then flashing the ICS kernel, but it did not work.

    Oh well. I'll be waiting.

  • by bemymonkey (1244086) on Tuesday July 10, 2012 @01:42AM (#40599627)

    If I remember correctly, the issue was that app developers were hiding vital functions behind the menu button, and there was no way to know whether the menu button actually worked on certain screens. Take the Android WiFi settings as a prime example - to enter the advanced WiFi settings, you had to press Menu and then Advanced, even though there was no indication to the user, and there is no menu as such (i.e. the menu button does nothing) in any of the other Android settings dialogs - how is the user supposed to know that he can access a whole other dialog by pressing Menu and hitting "Advanced"? The only way to find out (unless someone tells you) is to go through every single screen of a new app and press the menu button on each one, to see if a different menu pops up somewhere - and this really was the case on MANY Android apps... you'd get access to an entirely different menu from screen A than from screen B, and certain settings would only be available by pressing menu when already in the settings dialog - very confusing for end users.

    I do agree that they should have kept the menu button in the same place though. Maybe just make the backlight (on devices where applicable) only light up when there's actually a menu available... and a better icon would have been nice... but tbh - I don't think I could have thought up a better one...

  • by oakgrove (845019) on Tuesday July 10, 2012 @02:04AM (#40599709)
    I realize your money's already spent but the WiFi Motorola Xoom [android.com] is the only 10 inch tablet with AOSP support. Samsung should be ashamed of themselves for not updating your device in a timely manner but in the future, I'd at least have a peek at that page I linked before putting money down.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday July 10, 2012 @02:52AM (#40599843)

    "As a mobile developer, I find that it's a simple problem to deal with by just coding to an older API."

    That's exactly the problem. People having to code with older APIs due to platform fragmentation means that new features of the OS have far lower adoption rates even for the devices that can handle them.

  • Re:Yet (Score:3, Informative)

    by Per Abrahamsen (1397) on Tuesday July 10, 2012 @04:49AM (#40600237) Homepage

    The GSM Nexus S started OTA updating in December, then stopped with no explanation when the majority still haven't received an update, and finally restarted in March with the 4.0.4 update. The rumours were that the OTA update was suspended because of poor battery performance, which was only fixed in 4.0.4. Fair enough, but Google could have been more open about it.

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