Please create an account to participate in the Slashdot moderation system

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Be Open Source Operating Systems

BeOS Clone Haiku Releases R1 Alpha 4 117

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the unix-haters-handbook dept.
New submitter kallisti5 writes "The Haiku project released their 4th alpha release today. A year and four months have passed since the 3rd alpha release. Haiku R1A4 includes several enhancements such as a large number of bug fixes, early IPv6 support, better drivers, improved file system support, better localization, and a wide variety of new features and applications." Multimedia enhancements include support for modern Intel and Radeon HD cards.
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

BeOS Clone Haiku Releases R1 Alpha 4

Comments Filter:
  • by Taco Cowboy (5327) on Monday November 12, 2012 @06:59PM (#41961837) Journal

    ... and nobody will remember what "Haiku" or "BeOS" is all about.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      no kidding, most people cant even remember what the X is OSX is for...

      • no kidding, most people cant even remember what the X is OSX is for...

        And very few seem to realize that there is no X in either Playstation or Playstation 1 (aka PS1, not to be confused with the IBM PS/1).

        • by Anonymous Coward
          PSX was the internal codename used for the PlayStation. PS1 was never used and PSOne was only used for the redesigned slim model.
          • I use PS1 similar to how The Great War later became known as World War I, one of those after the fact things.

            And thanks for explaining where the term PSX came from. I'm still tempted now to feign surprise at how we missed out on the Playstation 4 through 9 though whenever people continue to refer to the original Playstation as the PSX. Muahahahaha.

        • Ack, I hate that. They don't seem to realize that the PSX was a different piece of kit. [wikipedia.org]

    • Right just like nobody knows what e17 is about...
      • by zikoo (1947516)
        If I remeber just right, everyone used to say that everone else would forget about e17.
    • by Anonymous Coward

      oh I don't know, Beos officially died in 2001? 02? and it still has an active cult behind it..

      • by Anonymous Coward

        oh I don't know, Beos officially died in 2001? 02? and it still has an active cult behind it..

        The Mormans use it?

        • by Anonymous Coward

          The Mormans use it?

          Too much LDS back in the '60s.

      • by aliquis (678370)

        Legion of the undead?

        We have that in the Amiga camp to. :D

    • by origin2k (302035) on Monday November 12, 2012 @07:07PM (#41961923)

      Be is gone so sad
      Haiku is here so no fear
      Bits and bytes take time

      • by Anonymous Coward

        It's only really sad
        if you still give a fuck
        which too would be sad

        • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

          by Anonymous Coward

          O.S. philistine
          can't count haiku syllables
          so his verse is fail

    • by lucmove (757341) on Monday November 12, 2012 @07:43PM (#41962229) Journal

      In 10 years, nobody will remember what "Haiku" or "BeOS" is all about.

      ...unlike today, when hordes of people know what "Haiku" and "BeOS" are all about. Right?

    • by 91degrees (207121)
      You can more or less say that about it now.

      Personally, I loved BeOS, but for various reasons ended up as something of a dead end. Everything else has moved on. There are still a few nice idea in the OS but I'd far prefer to see them incorporated into something new.
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by UltraZelda64 (2309504)

      Haiku has been making excellent progress over the last couple of years compared to another clone, ReactOS. Haiku is actually quite usable as it is and pretty stable. In fact, I'd say its stability gives Win9x and even most Windows XP installations I've seen a run for their money. I don't mess with Windows any more since XP, but I do know at least one person who kept getting program crashed and BSODs in Vista and he still gets them occasionally in 7. ReactOS, by comparison, feels like a pre-alpha at best

      • by Pieroxy (222434)

        Giving Win9x a run for its money in terms of stability is almost an insult. The thing barely booted up !

        XP is another matter.

        • by BenoitRen (998927)

          Giving Win9x a run for its money in terms of stability is almost an insult. The thing barely booted up !

          I know it's popular to hate on Win9x, but quit spreading bullshit like that.

          • by Pieroxy (222434)

            I've used Windows 2, then 3, then 3.1 then 95, then 98, then ME. They are such monumental piece of crap that they - IMO - do not deserve the title of OS. They were a poorly written graphical layer on top of DOS, which was just a "Disk Operating System". It managed disks and barely anything else.

            Granted, over the years, they added several things, such as printer drivers support, graphics drivers support etc and it made it look more and more like a full fledged operating system. However, trying to run a few t

            • by BenoitRen (998927)

              They were a poorly written graphical layer on top of DOS, which was just a "Disk Operating System".

              This is popular revisionism. Starting with Windows 3.1 it was no longer a DOS program as it used its own drivers and did its own memory management.

              You see, the problem was that all apps had the full control over the entire machine, by design, since it was the way things were back in old DOS mode and backward compatibility was "paramount".

              Nonsense. Windows 95 and its younger brethren are preemptive multi-task

              • by Pieroxy (222434)

                They were a poorly written graphical layer on top of DOS, which was just a "Disk Operating System".

                This is popular revisionism. Starting with Windows 3.1 it was no longer a DOS program as it used its own drivers and did its own memory management.

                In fact, starting at Windows 95, things get a little muddy, I agree. But there is still MS-DOS behind the scene as all old programs need it. So apps are given way too many privileges. And the scheduler is based on interruptions which can be meddled with from any MS-DOS app.

                You see, the problem was that all apps had the full control over the entire machine, by design, since it was the way things were back in old DOS mode and backward compatibility was "paramount".

                Nonsense. Windows 95 and its younger brethren are preemptive multi-tasking OSs.

                Well, technically true. But given the fact that accessing a floppy disk drive halts the entire system, I'll say they missed the target by a wide margin. In fact, any interrupt call can freeze the OS to death. So my point stands: apps were

  • Or is it only fit for a virtual machine?

  • by viperidaenz (2515578) on Monday November 12, 2012 @07:24PM (#41962067)
    I just got back from a trip in my DeLorean and in 2017 Haiku Release R1 Beta 1 was announced.
  • BeOS was a good looking interface - for its time. Now it (and by extension Haiku) looks rather dated by comparison with modern GUIs (especially when you look at the lovely looking things that Apple, or google with its Android project buttery loveliness create.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Monday November 12, 2012 @08:34PM (#41962719)

    You naysayers can feel free to call me crazy, but Haiku has a better chance at winning the desktop than Linux ever did. It is exactly the kind of coherent and elegantly designed platform that is as attractive to users as it is to developers. Haiku has been a slow starter, so it may take a while to happen unless more devs start to look at the prospect of seriously contributing to it. But the truth is, quality takes time. The Linux approach of "code first, ask questions later" does get things done faster. The desktop is just one of those cases where better will always beat faster in the long run.

    • Which would you choose: pretty, but zero available apps; or less elegant, but you can get work done?

      It may be "elegant", but I cannot find *ANY* technical advantage this has over some normal, mature Linux distro.

      • by mattr (78516)

        Different people have different definitions of "work".

      • by BenoitRen (998927)

        I'll give you a technical advantage: it's designed for the desktop instead of the server all the way down to the kernel. Linux makes for a shitty desktop all things considered.

    • by lucmove (757341)

      Shenanigans. I tested it a couple of years ago and was definitely unimpressed. It's not godawful ugly, but it's not that pretty either. It is in fact clearly outdated, old-fashioned, obsolete. It is clearly based on Windows 95, only worse. Add little choice in applications and obviously poor hardware support, and this will never be anything more than a hobby for lonely nerds with nothing to do on a Saturday night.

      • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

        by Anonymous Coward

        The reason for the outdated interface is that Haiku R1 is going to be strictly an attempt to clone BeOS. That was always the stated goal of the project. R2 on the other hand, will be the version where the Haiku team really focuses on building upon what they have to create something better. That being said, the internals of Haiku are already fairly robust and capable, and have advanced well beyond the capabilities of BeOS. I think that once R1 is complete and the internals are solid and stable, the road to 2

        • by lucmove (757341)

          The road to 2.0 (or will it be 3.0?) will be plagued by unsupported hardware issues. That will be a show stopper.

  • by davidwr (791652)

    Haiku, BeOS. / One inspired by the other. / R1, Alpha 4.

  • The Haiku project released their 4th alpha release today.....

    Me? I'm waiting for their 2nd beta release.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    If you can surf porn with it, its good to go!

  • Can it run on Virtualbox?

    • by Anonymous Coward

      Yes. Just make a new machine and mount the two drives.

"It's ten o'clock... Do you know where your AI programs are?" -- Peter Oakley

Working...