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VLC For Windows 8 Reaches $65,000 Funding Goal On Kickstarter 210

Posted by timothy
from the consume-your-delicious-media dept.
An anonymous reader writes "A Metro version of VLC, the popular free and open-source media player, is coming to Windows 8. On Sunday, the VideoLAN organization reached its funding goal on Kickstarter for its Windows 8-specific app. There are also plans to port it afterwards to Windows Phone 8. The project has now been funded by over 2,500 backers, who have pledged more than the £40,000 ($65,000) goal."
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VLC For Windows 8 Reaches $65,000 Funding Goal On Kickstarter

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  • Why wouldn't the usual version work on Win8? I was under the impression that there is a Classic-like interface, sans Start Menu?

    • Re:VLC (Score:5, Informative)

      by ClaraBow (212734) on Sunday December 23, 2012 @06:21PM (#42377901)
      This is for the Metro version which will work on RT, Windows phone and Windows x86
      • Re:VLC (Score:5, Insightful)

        by Nerdfest (867930) on Sunday December 23, 2012 @06:26PM (#42377927)

        ... assuming Microsoft 'approves' it. Buying into a locked ecosystem is a mistake. It's rewarding a company for taking the ownership of your hardware away.

        • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

          by ClaraBow (212734)
          True. There is a good chance that it might not be approved if MS wants to push it's media player to drive music and movie sales. We shall see!
          • Re:VLC (Score:5, Insightful)

            by Eirenarch (1099517) on Sunday December 23, 2012 @07:45PM (#42378385)

            There is zero chance that MS will not improve it. They are desperate for apps and they approve total crap. They will not ban a quality app. Also the music player has nothing to do with selling music. The player is not related to the files you get from their service.

            • Re:VLC (Score:4, Insightful)

              by elashish14 (1302231) <profcalc4 @ g m ail.com> on Sunday December 23, 2012 @10:19PM (#42379091)

              The issue is not whether they will approve it or not. The issue is in the principle of acting as if the hardware vendor has the right to choose what software the user and proprietor chooses to run.

              As developers, we should not be complicit this terrible precendent, and we should not contribute in any way to the positive health of this system.

              • by tompaulco (629533)
                The issue is in the principle of acting as if the hardware vendor has the right to choose what software the user and proprietor chooses to run.
                Or, in this case, the software vendor.
              • by LWATCDR (28044)

                A lot of people want someone to else to keep them safe. As long as sideloading is an option I am not going to get too upset about "official app stores".
                The issue for me is, why waste the effort? Windows 8 is not popular at all. It lacks apps and the OS is buggy. Windows 8, Windows Phone 8, and Windows 8 rt are going to be a bigger fail for Microsoft than Vista ever was. Just as the tech press, Microsoft faithful, and a few techies here and there will pop up with, "It is fine, I have no problems, and You ju

                • That's up to the people with $65K to decide. The effort of the devs is not wasted because they are paid to do it.

            • by isorox (205688)

              There is zero chance that MS will not improve it. They are desperate for apps and they approve total crap. They will not ban a quality app. Also the music player has nothing to do with selling music. The player is not related to the files you get from their service.

              I suspect Microsoft have contributed a large amount to the project

        • then you can just side load it.

          • by Nerdfest (867930)

            I was under the impression that it wasn't allowed under the metro interface. Is that something easy for the average user?

            • by Flipao (903929)
              No, you need to be a developer. With Metro, it's Microsoft's way or the highway.
              • Wrong (Score:5, Informative)

                by cbhacking (979169) <been_out_cruisin ... nOSPam.yahoo.com> on Sunday December 23, 2012 @10:52PM (#42379221) Homepage Journal

                That is incorrect. Nice FUD, though.

                1. Admin Powershell prompt (easily available even on Windows RT).
                2. Show-WindowsDeveloperLicenceRegistration (yes, this is a PS command. Try "show-wi" + [TAB])
                3. Enter Windows Live credentials. They don't have to be the ones you sign in with (in fact, you don't have to be using Windows Live signin at all), and the don't have to be associated with a developer account in any way. In fact, they can be for a throw-away account.
                4. Download an APPX package and run its install script. Congrats, sideloading achieved.

                The status of the "developer registration" will need to be periodically refreshed, as by default it expires after a month. However, it costs nothing except a trivial amount of time, and you can refresh it repeatedly.

                • Re:Wrong (Score:5, Funny)

                  by Anonymous Coward on Monday December 24, 2012 @01:06AM (#42379751)
                  And people say Linux is complicated :P
                • Re:Wrong (Score:5, Insightful)

                  by penix1 (722987) on Monday December 24, 2012 @01:51AM (#42379857) Homepage

                  Let's go back to the grandparent:

                  Is that something easy for the average user?

                  Now let's list those steps again:

                  1. Admin Powershell prompt (easily available even on Windows RT).
                  2. Show-WindowsDeveloperLicenceRegistration (yes, this is a PS command. Try "show-wi" + [TAB])
                  3. Enter Windows Live credentials. They don't have to be the ones you sign in with (in fact, you don't have to be using Windows Live signin at all), and the don't have to be associated with a developer account in any way. In fact, they can be for a throw-away account.
                  4. Download an APPX package and run its install script. Congrats, sideloading achieved.

                  The status of the "developer registration" will need to be periodically refreshed, as by default it expires after a month. However, it costs nothing except a trivial amount of time, and you can refresh it repeatedly.

                  Doesn't look to me like something the "average user" (read Joe Sixpack) can do to me.... Besides, I thought Microsoft hated the command line given their proclivity to denigrate its use in Linux.

                  • by Microlith (54737)

                    He also fails to mention that the certificate can be revoked and lasts no more than 120 days. This isn't side loading, it's abusing a convoluted system by which you can use VS2012 to test and debug formerly-Metro software.

                    It's nowhere near like you can do on X86 using desktop applications, or even on Android with its checkbox. It's slightly less dickish than iOS with its mandatory $99 fee before you can so much as test on hardware.

        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by JWW (79176)

          Just wondering if that one asshole developer who blocked the client on iOS will block it for windows phone as well.

          • He worked for Nokia, so not as likely.
          • Re:VLC (Score:5, Informative)

            by mrbrown1602 (536940) <mrbrownNO@SPAMmrbrown.net> on Sunday December 23, 2012 @07:59PM (#42378485) Homepage Journal

            That one asshole developer claims on his blog [remlab.net] that it is "uncertain" whether or not the terms of the Windows Store are compatible with the GPLv2 and then goes on an incomprehensible rant about the App Store and Applidium (the developers of the short-lived iOS VLC app), all in the name of 'freedom'. As in beer.

            So, yes, in short, he's still an asshole.

            • by devent (1627873)

              Wait. So the developer of VLC, that application that you so much use, have chosen to license the app and libraries under an open source license and have chosen to make VLC for free available to you.

              Now that Apple have chosen to make their app-store not GPL friendly, and Mircosoft have chosen to do the same, you say he, the developer, is an "asshole"?

              wow, just wow. I think if you look at the mirror you can see the real "asshole" here.
              Where is your contribution to VLC, where is your media library?

          • by SeaFox (739806)

            Just wondering if that one asshole developer who blocked the client on iOS will block it for windows phone as well.

            Couldn't the other developers have just wrote new code to serve the functionality of the stuff he wrote and replace his code, thereby removing him from the project contributor list in effect and making his opinion moot?

            • He is one of the very few core VLC developers and has been for some time. He is involved in a lot of the hard bits of VLC's code, so it is very unlikely that his code could be replaced.

          • Re:VLC (Score:4, Insightful)

            by SilenceBE (1439827) on Monday December 24, 2012 @01:43AM (#42379845)
            I was always under the impression his reasoning had to do with his irrational hatred agains iDevice users. When you explain your actions with "I don't care for iDevice users" there isn't much room for discussion.

            Now when looking at his resume which is plasterd with Nokia adventures, I have the feeling it has a lot more to do with butthurt and frustration regarding the downfall of Nokia.

            The whole freedom, fsf, whatever claim seems also weird for somebody that mentions different software patents on his resume. I find it kind of hypocritical for somebod with high freedom morals.

            Seeing his works relations with Nokia I want to bet on it, nithing will happen. That ks typical for such kind of people.
            • by penix1 (722987)

              The whole freedom, fsf, whatever claim seems also weird for somebody that mentions different software patents on his resume. I find it kind of hypocritical for somebod with high freedom morals.

              True freedom would be donating the code to the public domain so in that regard even the FSF is hypocritical since the GPL itself has restrictions in its use.

          • by drinkypoo (153816)

            Yes, what an asshole for preventing his work being used for precisely the purpose he didn't want it used for. It's almost like he put his time and effort into it and you didn't and therefore don't have a leg to stand on but are crying about it anyway because you have a deep sense of entitlement.

        • Re:VLC (Score:4, Insightful)

          by girlintraining (1395911) on Sunday December 23, 2012 @07:12PM (#42378177)

          ... assuming Microsoft 'approves' it. Buying into a locked ecosystem is a mistake. It's rewarding a company for taking the ownership of your hardware away.

          Well, there's now $65,000 out there willing to test the waters. And the developers don't lose anything if it fails -- only the investors do. I'd guess a lot of that will be spent on the lawyer screwing about over patents... it might be the case that the only thing required is a few edits here and there to surgically transplant the UI. Porting an app usually costs a fraction of the original development cost. If portability was considered from the initial design, it might only require a few hours work to prep it for compiling on a different architecture. And it's open source; Projects that survive as long as VLC has do so because the programmers made it a goal to keep maintenance down. Release one bad app and you'll be supporting it for the rest of your life. :)

        • by Nerdfest (867930)

          I'm curious about people moderating this as 'troll'. Do you think a locked ecosystem is a good thing? Do you think rewarding manufacturers who do it is going to result in you having more control over your hardware?

          • I'm curious about people moderating this as 'troll'. Do you think a locked ecosystem is a good thing? Do you think rewarding manufacturers who do it is going to result in you having more control over your hardware?

            You had me right up until the third word: Think. No, the moderators do not think. They agree or disagree. Thinking is so Malda-era, and our new Web 3.0 monetization of the synergy of infolectual peer based interaction systems function better without it.

            • by gmhowell (26755)

              Thinking is so Malda-era,

              I hope you mean this in the generic sense rather than specifically referring to this website when CmdrTaco was around. Quite frankly, it didn't seem that he gave two shits beginning somewhere around the time when Y2K didn't end the world or maybe right after he proposed.

              Unless you've got a considerably smaller UID to come back with, I'm going to have to say that your longing for some greater, better, more wonderful time is complete and total horseshit. Slashdot has always sucked. At times, off and on, it ha

          • by kestasjk (933987) *
            For media consumption devices yes; they mean a marketplace in which theft is harder, so software is cheaper and there's more experimentation with DLC, and it makes malware much harder to propogate, no devices which can't afford background processes or anti-virus.

            For media creation devices it's a nice option to have at least.

            Also I've written apps for my Windows Phone; they're easy to write, and they're pretty specific to things I want (graphing my phone data usage, implementing my password system). Th
        • by Dr Max (1696200)
          Why didn't you tell all the iphone developers that before they broke the system.
    • Re:VLC (Score:5, Funny)

      by Threni (635302) on Sunday December 23, 2012 @06:22PM (#42377903)

      Presumably it's quicker and easier to fund a complete new version of VLC that it is to work out how the fuck you're supposed to launch and run a program under Windows 8?

    • by vux984 (928602)

      It works perfectly fine as a desktop app; and I've got VLC installed myself.

      But this new version should also run on ARM windows RT devices along with Windows phones, where obviously the "usual version" currently does not, and would not really be appropriate user interface-wise even if it did.

      A tablet / touch / full screen version of VLC for that platform makes a lot of sense, and it would be pretty nice on x86 windows 86 systems for watching movies etc -- I'd like it for my HTPC for example.

      I'll keep the cl

      • Many people may not like the Don't-call-it-Metro UI but here are $65K that like it.

    • by Pinhedd (1661735)

      In order for an application to be perfectly portable between Windows 8, Windows RT, and Windows Phone 8 it needs to target the WinRT Run Time (related to, but not synonymous with Windows RT). Currently, VLC presumably targets the Win32 runtime which means it will run just fine on Windows 8, but not on Windows RT or Windows Phone 8.

  • New Kickstarter Idea (Score:3, Interesting)

    by binarylarry (1338699) on Sunday December 23, 2012 @06:24PM (#42377913)

    How about we start a kickstarter to not port VLC to windows phone?

  • Let Windows 8 Die (Score:3, Interesting)

    by muncadunc (1679192) on Sunday December 23, 2012 @06:26PM (#42377929)
    I would be much happier if nobody ported their software, and Windows 8 was allowed to completely fail.

    Then Microsoft would be forced to fix the UI and bring back the start menu.
    • With lock in, new PC sales, and people saying "it can't be too bad, it's from MS" it was going to get out there on a pile of machines even if it had ended up a bigger pile of shit than Vista than whatever it really is. I still have to support two piece of shit Vista 32bit machines because some idiots sneaked them in from the side, and Win8 doesn't seem to be hated as much as Vista was before the first service pack.
    • by isorox (205688)

      I would be much happier if nobody ported their software, and Windows 8 was allowed to completely fail.

      Then Microsoft would be forced to fix the UI and bring back the start menu.

      As long as progman.exe still works.

  • 65K? (Score:4, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward on Sunday December 23, 2012 @06:28PM (#42377943)

    Why, that's annual salary of an entry-to-mid level programmer. Seems like it would take a whole lot more. Sort of a strange target.

    • Re:65K? (Score:5, Insightful)

      by __Paul__ (1570) on Sunday December 23, 2012 @07:03PM (#42378137) Homepage

      Alternatively, it is the salary of a high-level programmer who is willing to take a pay-cut in order to avoid daily commuting, pair-programming, stand-up meetings, team-building weekends, unpaid overtime, Six Sigma, and all the other bullshit that comes with high-paying jobs in the corporate world.

    • by Sir_Sri (199544)

      We do student projects on this scale in 4 months with 5-6 kids. Doesn't seem like it's that big a deal.

      It's just changing the UI to use the metro language, and performance optimization for ARM on windows RT and anything that crops up along the way. It's not trivial, but it's not like they have to write an entire media player, with codec support etc. from scratch, or at least, hopefully don't.

    • Seems like it would take a whole lot more.

      VLC is already modularized. Most of the functionality resides inside a library, and this library has already been ported to ARM CPUs too.

      The only thing needed is "just" yet another UI. Next to the classic windows, Mac OS X Quartz, Linux GTK, Linux QT, textmode and a few other less known, they now need to add a metro interface.
      It's basically just making new menu/button that work nicely on a metro tile, and connecting them to the already existing portable VLC engine.

      That will actually require only a couple of

  • by Dan East (318230) on Sunday December 23, 2012 @07:11PM (#42378175) Homepage Journal

    I used to use VLC exclusively, but then it began to choke on newer codecs and more demanding resolutions. I upgraded and the latest build was far worse (no audio half the time, problems skipping, etc) so I had to revert back to an older version. I've switched to Media Player Classic (which I used to use over 5 years ago before VLC) and am very pleased because it "simply works". So IMO, MPC has leapfrogged VLC in their back and forth development surges. The fact that the latest releases of VLC were worse leads me to believe whatever developers are now active are not doing such a good job.

    Until VLC can be made to halfway work on ANY platform, I'd be hesitant to try and push it out to Windows 8. There are fundamental problems with the low level decoding right now that need to be fixed first, before high level GUI / API / OS stuff is tweaked for a new OS.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      I see the opposite on Win7 64-bit, actually Dan East! To wit:

      I went to Media Player Classic 64-bit for about a year, prior to lately/now!

      (Since I went to 64-bit Windows 7 circa 2009 when it released)

      However, lately, on SOME video files? MediaPlayer Classic began to LAG...

      Even using its 'optimized' output option.

      So, it was time to try VLC 64-bit & since versions before the one I use now in 2.05 just recently released (2.02 - 2.04)? It hauls ass, & doesn't "lag frames" like I've seen Media Player Clas

      • keep on posting like that; seriously, you changed for the best :)
        an ex- coward that now cower in fear of Mikaealchristthepet628
    • by fermion (181285)
      While on non-MS Windows there are many different GUIs to play videos, on MS Windows I have found VLC to be the only reliable method to play videos. Now on MS Windows 7 and 8 MS may have included a workable interface, so VLC may not be a necessity. On other platforms it is optional.
    • Interesting, what do you mean by more demanding resolutions? I haven't had any problems whatsoever with good old 1080p source material, even when playing back on high-res displays (2560x1600) with rather old hardware.

      Are you playing 4k or 8k something else insane? Have you checked your CPU load? Activated HWA decoding?

    • by drinkypoo (153816)

      I used to use VLC exclusively, but then it began to choke on newer codecs and more demanding resolutions.

      I've noticed time and again that mplayer will play files that vlc claims to support, but that it chokes on. Usually gstreamer chokes on the same file, or will at least hang if you try to seek.

    • by mooglez (795643)

      The thing with VLC is, that its a shit-ton more than just a media player. You can't really find any other single piece of software that could replace it IF you also use it for its other uses.

      But I do agree, that for just playing video files, I am torn between it and MPC-HC

  • This isn't to troll, but I am sorry to say, that VLC versions 2.x.x and up were too slow for my liking compared to the 1.x.x seies. Talk of "improving the customer experience!"

    Needless to say, I abandoned ship! On Android, I have discovered BSPlayer FREE [google.com]. This is one player that will not throw errors at the multiple video formats I've thrown at it. VLC on Android isn't even out of beta! On windows, it chokes and sucks big time!

    • You're not alone. I still use it on Windows for its wide video support, but even on simple audio files (mp3, mostly), it's become a real dog.

  • by Trillian_1138 (221423) <slashdot@fridaythan[ ]om ['g.c' in gap]> on Sunday December 23, 2012 @07:26PM (#42378265)
    The article link in the OP has some interesting quotes, but to not include the actual Kickstarter project page [kickstarter.com] (which still has 5 days to go) seems incredibly lazy...
  • I happen to be a marginal freak that happen to like win8 on my laptop and HTPC. A native VLC version will be great for me.

    However I would not installed it on my desktop because 1: I lack a license to do so and 2: I would have to buy start8.
    • by cbhacking (979169)

      ... why would you need Start8? The Start screen is perfectly capable of launching desktop apps such as VLC. The goal of this Kickstarter is to break a Windows Store (using The Interface Formerly Known As Metro) version, including porting to Windows RT.

  • While I don't care much if VLC is ported, the idea of a community sponsored software development is interesting to me. I have often felt that software design decisions appear arbitrary for me (small time no-influence user). This gives people an actual insight into what are popular features, and a heads-up on future changes.

    While many companies have feedback (submit suggestions) on their website, it seems like it is flushed down the tubes. I get a "Thank you for blah blah blah" and have no idea of what hap

  • I will never understand what people at Microsoft are smoking... the latest and greatest flagship windows phone 8 platform won't even play wave files... a format Microsoft itself had a hand in creating and still widely used for lossless audio.

    There is soo much missing in windows phone 8 existing in windows mobile since almost a decade ago ..really basic shit still does not exist in the platform. Bluetooth HID, serial bluetooth profiles, PAN, file transfer, VPNs and basic data synchronization all totally mis

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