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One Boston Marathon Bomb Suspect Dead, Other At Large After Shootout With Police 1109

Posted by Soulskill
from the apparently-this-stuff-does-actually-happen-in-real-life dept.
theodp writes "During the night, The Tech broke news that gunshots were reported at MIT near 32 Vassar Street (the Ray and Maria Stata Center for Computer, Information, and Intelligence Sciences), and one officer was shot and taken to Mass General Hospital. MIT's Emergency Information page also reports that injuries have been reported. Sadly, CNN is now reporting that the university police officer has died. Look for updates on Twitter." The two suspects identified earlier as being behind the Boston Marathon bombings are believed to be responsible for this. They were found by police. One suspect, 26-year-old Tamerlan Tsarnaev, was killed in a shootout. The other suspect, 19-year-old Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, is still being pursued. The Associated Press reports that the two are believed to be from the Russian region near Chechnya. During the firefight, the suspects threw explosive devices at police. Public transit in Boston has been shut down, and hundreds of thousands of people have been asked to not leave their homes. Here are live feed for local TV news and emergency services audio. Police have been warned that the remaining suspect may have a suicide vest.

Reader Okian Warrior points out a related story worthy of notice: "The 4chan crowd, poring over images of the Boston marathon, identified two dark-skinned and bag-carrying suspects (among others). This was then picked up by The New York Post, who ran the image on Thursday's front page with the headline 'Feds seek these two pictured at Boston Marathon.' And now, a completely innocent teen now finds himself scared to leave his home."
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One Boston Marathon Bomb Suspect Dead, Other At Large After Shootout With Police

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  • by alphatel (1450715) * on Friday April 19, 2013 @08:36AM (#43491669)
    Will also plant bombs for passport apparently. Tamerlan Tsarnaev [photoshelter.com] seeks US Passport for "Olympics"
    • by MerceanCoconut (1145401) <chris@northfolk.ca> on Friday April 19, 2013 @09:15AM (#43492161) Homepage
      One of the photo captions reads:

      Tamerlan says: "I don't have a single American friend, I don't understand them."

  • MIT (Score:5, Insightful)

    by symes (835608) on Friday April 19, 2013 @08:38AM (#43491689) Journal

    It looks like, from what I can gather from online media etc., that they were carrying explosives to plant around MIT. And it was campus security that first become suspicious. If this is the case, then thoughts are with the campus security officer that gave his life - a lot of students are probably a lot better off because of his bravery. Thoughts are with everyone in boston and hope this is over soon.

    • Re:MIT (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward on Friday April 19, 2013 @09:06AM (#43492021)

      If this is the case, then thoughts are with the campus security officer that gave his life
       
      Why aren't your thoughts with him anyway? Even if he was just pulling the guys over for driving too fast on campus the bottom line is still the same; he's a guy who's dead for just doing his job.
       
      There are tons of crappy cops, yes. The ratio of crappy versus good cops seems to go up when you're dealing with rent-a-cops and security, yes. But the bulk of people enforcing the law are just looking to do the right thing, go home alive and enjoy life just as much as you and me. I believe it's a profession that gets a bad rap because there are plenty of abusive asses who are drawn to a job with the prospect of beating people down but I think there are many more who are drawn to the profession because they have an honest interest in serving and protecting.
       
      Sorry if you didn't mean it that way but there are just so many people around here who are willing to look down on a cop just because he is a cop. No different a form of bigotry than any other.

      • Re:MIT (Score:5, Insightful)

        by drinkypoo (153816) <martin.espinoza@gmail.com> on Friday April 19, 2013 @09:14AM (#43492137) Homepage Journal

        There are tons of crappy cops, yes. The ratio of crappy versus good cops seems to go up when you're dealing with rent-a-cops and security, yes. But the bulk of people enforcing the law are just looking to do the right thing, go home alive and enjoy life just as much as you and me.

        [citation needed]

        People believe cops are bad because cops do so many bad things. They have not taken responsibility as a group and purged their ranks of bad cops, so people will continue to assume that every cop is a bad cop. This is the only rational assumption to make, because many of them are bad people, and they have power over you. Thus, you must be on your guard against bad cops, and you must assume that any cop interaction will go wrong.

        • Re:MIT (Score:5, Interesting)

          by P-niiice (1703362) on Friday April 19, 2013 @09:23AM (#43492267)
          In other words, many are good cops despite being cops.
        • Re:MIT (Score:4, Insightful)

          by MacGyver2210 (1053110) on Friday April 19, 2013 @10:02AM (#43492911)

          Even though I think MANY cops are bad at their job, and abuse their authority, I actually think some are quite good at it. They are respectful and polite, and don't immediately assume because they are talking to you that you have done something wrong or you are a victim.

          On the other end of the spectrum you get such gems as the officers who pull their service weapon during traffic stops because they think everyone wants to kill them because of the uniform.

          Here's a hint for the bad cops: if you aren't a dick to everyone you interact with, most people don't want to kill you for doing your job.

      • Re:MIT (Score:5, Informative)

        by sribe (304414) on Friday April 19, 2013 @09:35AM (#43492463)

        The ratio of crappy versus good cops seems to go up when you're dealing with rent-a-cops and security, yes.

        OK, just stop this bullshit now.

        MIT Campus Police are real police, recruited only from among real police departments, with lots of experience required before they can even apply to the department.

        • Re:MIT (Score:4, Informative)

          by sociocapitalist (2471722) on Friday April 19, 2013 @10:39AM (#43493433)

          The ratio of crappy versus good cops seems to go up when you're dealing with rent-a-cops and security, yes.

          OK, just stop this bullshit now.

          MIT Campus Police are real police, recruited only from among real police departments, with lots of experience required before they can even apply to the department.

          Because of campus police like Lt. John Pike http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UC_Davis_pepper-spray_incident [wikipedia.org]

          I'm not saying all campus police (or any other type for that matter) are bad, but one might not automatically assume they're good guys either.

          • by drnb (2434720) on Friday April 19, 2013 @12:26PM (#43494691)

            Because of campus police like Lt. John Pike http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UC_Davis_pepper-spray_incident [wikipedia.org]

            Your own link states that students *surounded* the police and *demanded* that those in custody be released. It further states that police ordered people to move and these people *refused*. What I recall from the full videos of the incident is that the police then pepper sprayed those people who refused to move and were *blocking* the path that the police wanted to use to exit the area.

            This was *not* police simply walking up to protesters and pepper spraying them. These were people blocking an exit route as police were surrounded.

      • by perpenso (1613749) on Friday April 19, 2013 @09:37AM (#43492509)

        ... The ratio of crappy versus good cops seems to go up when you're dealing with rent-a-cops and security, yes ...

        Campus police may be real cops, especially so at state schools. At the University of California they are actually equivalent to state police and may patrol areas off campus with large concentrations of students. At my campus when a nearby bank was robbed the UC Police were the first on scene, confronting and containing armed robbers. When a local police officer was shot during a routine traffic stop one night, and the suspect fled into a nearby industrial park, the UC Police, the local police and the police from the neighboring town were searching and clearing the buildings in the park. I forget which department actually found the guy.

      • Re:MIT (Score:5, Interesting)

        by CrimsonAvenger (580665) on Friday April 19, 2013 @01:15PM (#43495135)

        I believe it's a profession that gets a bad rap because there are plenty of abusive asses who are drawn to a job with the prospect of beating people down but I think there are many more who are drawn to the profession because they have an honest interest in serving and protecting.

        When the video footage of the Marathon Bombing started to be played, I pointed out to my wife that the it was a perfect example of the difference between the "average cop" and many people's perception of the average cop - the cops were the ones running TOWARD the explosions while everyone else ran AWAY.

        Just something to keep in mind....

  • by girlinatrainingbra (2738457) on Friday April 19, 2013 @08:40AM (#43491703)
    http://t.co/0A3Mjmshkz [t.co]
    .
    https://twitter.com/AKitz/status/325121071479156736/photo/1 [twitter.com]
    .
    https://twitter.com/akitz [twitter.com] = andrew kitzenberg's twitter site
    .
    supposedly, backpacks on Laurel Street where a police shoot-out occured. http://slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=3664323&cid=43490229 [slashdot.org]
  • Gotta Love 4chan (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Friday April 19, 2013 @08:42AM (#43491717)

    Reader Okian Warrior points out a related story worthy of notice:
    "The 4chan crowd, poring over images of the Boston marathon, identified two dark-skinned and bag-carrying suspects (among others). This was then picked up by The New York Post, who ran the image on Thursday's front page with the headline 'Feds seek these two pictured at Boston Marathon.' And now, a completely innocent teen now finds himself scared to leave his home."

    Dark skinned. He must be guilty. Basically 4chan, like anonymous, is simply a bastion of the socially immature taking vigilante justice into their own hands. Stoke the fire of society's fears and then claim innocence when someone acts on their "information".

    • by craigminah (1885846) on Friday April 19, 2013 @09:02AM (#43491971)
      There were probably a lot of erroneous reports of dark-skinned males, light-skinned males, etc. Why don't you complain about the news reporters that "were hoping the perpetrators were white"?

      Islam produces a lot of radicals and their modus operandi (e.g. IED-style device) matches this attack so the odds are people will assume it was Islamist radicals. They shouldn't have said anything about the description of the suspects unless they were sure they were right so as not to distract anyone from finding the culprits.
  • by hcs_$reboot (1536101) on Friday April 19, 2013 @08:43AM (#43491739)
    Police did what they could to take them alive, since a dead person doesn't talk much. In that kind of situation, couldn't they use some kind of anaesthetic bullets? Sure, many people prefer them dead, but taking them alive is a way to collect more relevant information.
  • Big Echo Chamber (Score:4, Insightful)

    by cosm (1072588) <thecosm3@EEEgmail.com minus threevowels> on Friday April 19, 2013 @08:47AM (#43491781)
    Play by play......really slashdot? Give us a good post-op synopsis, don't fuel the speculation fire.
  • by eldavojohn (898314) * <eldavojohn.gmail@com> on Friday April 19, 2013 @08:48AM (#43491801) Journal

    "The 4chan crowd, poring over images of the Boston marathon, identified two dark-skinned and bag-carrying suspects (among others). This was then picked up by The New York Post, who ran the image on Thursday's front page with the headline 'Feds seek these two pictured at Boston Marathon.' And now, a completely innocent teen now finds himself scared to leave his home."

    Yesterday on my facebook news feed I saw no less than three fake images that could have been mean pranks. And I didn't even see the one listed above. So now all the "crowd sourced" news folks are going to remove images of this man [abcactionnews.com] and this woman [abcactionnews.com] and this guy [abcactionnews.com]. The reason I didn't propagate these things was that they could have been anybody! You could play a mean prank on a friend/enemy if you have a picture of him with a backpack.

    Also there are many fake first hand accounts but also some real first hand accounts in crowdsourced news. Ignore the former and herald the latter. People will think you're doing god's work simply because they didn't watch the shitfest that is crowdsourced news in the moments of pure confusion immediately following the event. The signal to noise ratio, the added noise, the fact that people can start leads anonymously, it all reeks of a really bad, lawless, unaccountable lynch mob.

    So now post hoc you scrub out all those false leads and you clean up all the things you were wrong about. Then when that's done you point out the few leads you were right about. Then you go on and on at length about how 4chan and reddit are the new real sources of journalism. The mainstream press is busted to all hell (do not confuse this with a free pass or defense for them) but they know they'll be held accountable and the New York Post's gamble should really turn into a slander/libel suit with damages paid out to that young man. NYP made money off those 'exclusive' images at the expense of a person's safety and that should be a civil suit that should expose the NYP for what it really is: a piece of shit rag no better than a tabloid version of "crowd-sourced" news.

    Who was it that initially fingered Salah Eddin Barhoum? You don't know and no one ever will because there is no integrity with how that lead was developed.

    • by Overzeetop (214511) on Friday April 19, 2013 @09:05AM (#43492009) Journal

      I know...mod me down as an anti-gun nut. But at least try to make the connection.

      The advantage of crowdsourcing is that you get a shit-ton of information quickly, and it gets disseminated just as quickly. Everybody with a cell phone and a social media account has had this stuff in front of them since the bombing. It's great because it happens so fast, and millions of people being on alert can make for a quicker break in the case. It also has the downside of putting up a lot of false positives.

      The NRA's stance is that if everyone had a gun, criminals would know not to so bad stuff and if they did there would be someone right there to stop them. It's basically crowd sourcing police/law enforcement work. Yes, there are now lots more people who can intervene with a criminal who is armed and dangerous. Just as everyone with a cell phone can photograph a scene and post the pictures on line for the world to peruse and instantly identify criminals.

      Thing is, the more people who are involved, the higher the likelihood of a false positive. In the case of photos and social media, the mis-identified have a reason to be concerned short term, but once the media self-corrects and the correct criminals are identified their lives will slowly get back to normal. When guns are involved, a mis-identified person or bystander doesn't get a new life when the actual criminal is killed. The "oops" is permanent.

      If you don't think there isn't the equivalent of 4chan in the vigilante world, you're sorely mistaken. It's part of the human condition to jump to conclusions based on limited evidence and not everyone will have the forethought or presence of mind not to take out someone who they think is about to cause harm to others.

      If we used the NRA method of justice, Salah Eddin Barhoum would have been dead before the FBI even published the photos of the actual bombers.

      (nb: I am a gun owner)

    • by turkeydance (1266624) on Friday April 19, 2013 @09:11AM (#43492093)
      remember Richard Jewel. http://www.businessinsider.com/lessons-from-richard-jewell-2013-4 [businessinsider.com]
    • The signal to noise ratio, the added noise, the fact that people can start leads anonymously, it all reeks of a really bad, lawless, unaccountable lynch mob.

      The only question, is who is surprised at this? Years of 4chan and Anonymous bullying and lulz - and folks expect them to clean up their act when the chips are down? Years of forwarding all manner of complete crap and puerile "analysis" and you expect the crowd to get it right this time? (That's the general "you", not the specific "you" OP.)

    • by girlintraining (1395911) on Friday April 19, 2013 @09:23AM (#43492271)

      , the fact that people can start leads anonymously, it all reeks of a really bad, lawless, unaccountable lynch mob.

      Yes, but if you point that out [slashdot.org], everyone jumps on you to shut you up. Asking even educated and highly literate people to restrain themselves is an excercise in futility. They will have their emotional satisfaction, dammit, and who cares who gets hurt? Yet these very same people rant about the ineptitude of government and the restriction of their civil liberties.

      Well guys, take a good look: The government found the right people, in a targeted search, within days. The general public, would, and have, condemned a half dozen innocent people to spent the rest of their lives in fear. Very few will feel any remorse whatsoever for reposting these "crowdsourced" reports. The officers who investigated this, on the other hand, risked and gave their lives in pursuit of the actual criminals... and nobody else. If this is any indication, the government is far better at keeping you safe and preserving your freedoms than the general public is. And the government, at least, apologizes when they screw up -- usually with big piles of cash to the victims.

      The vigilants can't say the same. Their only apology is that they're already looking for the next innocent to hang.

  • by girlinatrainingbra (2738457) on Friday April 19, 2013 @08:51AM (#43491833)
    Website of Djohar Tsarnaev [vk.com] at vk.com

    The New York Times [nytimes.com] is reporting that the two suspects attempted to light a bomb while engaging in gun-fire with the police during a standoff outside of the Watertown, MA, house of Andrew Kitzenberg. Andy Kitzenberg has been live tweeting [twitter.com] images of the police activity, shootout, and bomb explosions, and a bullet going through his wall and his armchair on twitter as linked above.

    One of the brothers went to Cambridge Rindge and Latin [wikipedia.org], one of the oldest high schools in the USA.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Friday April 19, 2013 @08:53AM (#43491863)

    You know what they will use this anecdote to justify: more cameras with better resolution that are always on. Think 'Eye of Sauron'.

  • by nimbius (983462) on Friday April 19, 2013 @08:55AM (#43491891) Homepage
    and, i fully expect to be modded down for this: if we allow ourselves to be terrorized, the point of the action was successful. Locking down the entire city, ordering businesses closed, and shutting down the mass transit system is the very definition of "successful terrorist attack." No amount of national anthem sing-song is going to somehow magically avoid this fact.
    • by squiggleslash (241428) on Friday April 19, 2013 @09:22AM (#43492245) Homepage Journal

      No, it's a temporary thing, based on the desire to apprehend two people considered extremely dangerous. If these people were Newtown style shooters - killing people out of mental instability rather than an ideological goal (and who knows, it's improbably but that might still be the case) and their exact whereabouts were unknown, I'd expect a similar reaction.

      Terror? No, you're giving in to it if, after these guys are dealt with, you institute permanent or pseudo-temporary security restrictions that affect everyone, or if you wildly attack foreign countries simply because they have tenuous links to a terrorist attack, and if you, yourself, refuse to board a plane or run in a marathon or take a job in a high building or panic upon hearing about a Islamic outreach center promoting peace being built half a mile away from the site of an Islamic terrorist attack, or refuse to step in a British pub, or British bus, or British train station, or...

      This isn't a case where fear is being used to shut down Boston, it's a case where a law enforcement process is temporarily having that affect. It's not permanent, it's not something unique to terrorism enforcement (in fact, it's refreshing seeing an act of terror be treated as the jurisdiction of law enforcement), and it's probably what has to be done right now.

  • by roman_mir (125474) on Friday April 19, 2013 @09:02AM (#43491981) Homepage Journal

    So what do you call them now, Americans, are these Chechen guys "terrorists" or "freedom fighters"?

    They are Islamist, that much certain, so why are they bombing USA, after all USA was probably more on the side of Chechens in their search for independence from Russia (this is of-course about oil, there is oil in Chechnya).

    However it is my personal guess that these guys wanted to bring some terror to USA as an asymmetric response to USA being in the Middle East, Afghanistan most likely. What is interesting is that the two brothers (Johar [vk.com] is the younger one) lived in USA as refugees since 2000-2001. What else could be their motivation if not a newly discovered sympathy towards their 'brothers in religion' somewhere in the Afghan mountains, being attacked by the US empire?

    I think this is an example of how exactly the war on Terror will backfire just like the war on drugs did with more violence and more drugs.

    War on terror creates more terrorists that were just kids just a few years ago. War on drugs creates more drug related violence.

    There is an old idea that violence begets violence, I think it's very much true.

    • by Grantbridge (1377621) on Friday April 19, 2013 @09:08AM (#43492065)
      Just because someone has Islam on his facebook page doesn't make him an Islamic terrorist. Were all the school shootings in the states Christian terrorists (Crusaders?) because they had Christian on their facebook page? We don't currently know what the brother's motivations were. Perhaps it was do with Chechen independence. Perhaps it was to do with religion. Perhaps they are just mentally ill individuals with an axe to grind with their local community. We don't know at the moment.
      • by roman_mir (125474) on Friday April 19, 2013 @09:22AM (#43492237) Homepage Journal

        Oh, give it a rest. For a few days I've been hearing the left talk about 'right wing nuts' blowing up the place because it was 15th of April, the tax day. I said on a few occasions that this had to do with the marathon, not with the date. If the marathon took place a day later or a day earlier, that's when the bombs would have gone off.

        I'm listening to the CBS Boston live feed [cbslocal.com] and one of the uncles of the two guys said just a little while Tamil (one of the brothers) told him he found his "new self" or something like that in Islam.

        So give it a rest, it is what it is.

        If a woman is murdered, the cops look at her husband as the most likely suspect, and you know what? Most of the time that's who killed her. Same is here, this is profiling and it works.

    • by benjfowler (239527) on Friday April 19, 2013 @09:27AM (#43492329)

      There is also the old adage that one should never bite the hand that feed him.

      The primary victims of this episode, will be America's embattled Muslims, and refugees in general.

      Al Qaeda are seriously at risk at winning battles but losing wars, as Muslims the world over finally figure out which side their bread is buttered on. It's already happened in Iraq -- when the penny finally dropped over there, Al Qaeda in Iraq went from winning to losing strategically in a matter of weeks.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Friday April 19, 2013 @09:08AM (#43492049)

    He's not from _near_ Chechnya. It's not a city, it's a region. They are Chechens. References to "his native Chechnya". (The capital is Grozny).

    He doesn't consider himself Russian, and he doesn't think he comes from "the Russian region near Chechnya". It was a de facto republic that Russia regained control of militarily.

    He's likely a Sunni muslim, but it's quite possible that isn't really a factor here; this could simply be an international protest bombing regarding the west's stance on Chechen independence. Chechens are Muslims the way that Russians are Orthodox Christians and Americans are Catholic or Calvinist in origin; Islam hasn't as far as I understand it been a feature element of their struggle.

  • by tehcyder (746570) on Friday April 19, 2013 @09:24AM (#43492279) Journal
    Russian in fact. That should confuse everybody nicely.

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