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United States Privacy

Why DOJ Didn't Need a "Super Search Warrant" To Snoop On Fox News' E-mail 330

Posted by samzenpus
from the because-I-say-so dept.
awaissoft writes "If attorney general Eric Holder wanted to perform even a momentary Internet wiretap on Fox News' e-mail accounts, he would have had to persuade a judge to approve what lawyers call a 'super search warrant.' A super search warrant's requirements are exacting: Intercepted communications must be secured and placed under seal. Real-time interception must be done only as a last resort. Only certain crimes qualify for this technique, the target must be notified, and additional restrictions apply to state and local police conducting real-time intercepts. But because of the way federal law was written nearly half a century ago, Holder was able to obtain a normal search warrant — lacking those extensive privacy protections — that allowed federal agents to secretly obtain up to six years of email correspondence between Fox News correspondent James Rosen and his alleged sources."
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Why DOJ Didn't Need a "Super Search Warrant" To Snoop On Fox News' E-mail

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  • by kms_one (1272174) on Sunday May 26, 2013 @05:17PM (#43828867)
    Don't let the Red/Blue Faux News debate cloud this issue. It doesn't matter who did it or to whom it is not okay and this policy should be banned.
    • The DOJ loves that this has become a Red/Blue slug fest. It diverts the public's attention from the real issue.

      Hell, I wouldn't be surprised if the DOJ is throwing fuel on that fire. If the Reds and Blues hung up their gloves for a minute, and really thought about it . . . they would both direct their guns at the DOJ instead of each other.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      Wow. Great way to be above the partisan ship. You can't even restrain yourself from the "Faux" talking point.

  • Blame game (Score:5, Insightful)

    by psherman2001 (2739057) on Sunday May 26, 2013 @05:24PM (#43828903)
    Doesn't matter who's fault it is...
    who started privacy abuses,
    what party is/was in power.


    There is something going terribly wrong here.

    We, as Americans,
    have obviously slid quite a little way down the slippery slope,
    toward something quite different than the bastion of freedom we like to think of ourselves as...

    We should be doing something more about it than pointing fingers and playing politics.
    • Re:Blame game (Score:5, Interesting)

      by icebike (68054) on Sunday May 26, 2013 @06:15PM (#43829091)

      Exactly.

      Everyone is so worried about whose ox was gored and whose ox did the goring that they are totally willing
      to overlook that we are all bleeding. And its not JUST this issue or JUST wiretaps.

      The constitution is in tatters, our freedoms are an illusion, and everybody thinks that as long as
      they can drive to a ball game and have a beer everything is just fine.

      • by russotto (537200)

        The constitution is in tatters, our freedoms are an illusion, and everybody thinks that as long as they can drive to a ball game and have a beer everything is just fine.

        And one side is working to get rid of the driving. The other side would be working on getting rid of the beer if they didn't need redneck support.

      • by kermidge (2221646)

        You two make sense (along with a few others), but it's easier for most to play 'he said, she said', while floating along in the shitstream that's left of our heritage on the way to the holding tank.

  • Reminder (Score:5, Informative)

    by Arancaytar (966377) <arancaytar.ilyaran@gmail.com> on Sunday May 26, 2013 @06:16PM (#43829097) Homepage

    An infringement on the freedom of the press, or the confidentiality of sources, is a threat to democracy regardless of whether it targets an actual news agency or a mockery thereof.

    • by amiga3D (567632)

      Did NBC get their e-mails snagged too?

    • While I think anything run by Murdoch is a corrupt mockery it appears to me that this reporter was engaged in real investigative journalism.

      As such his treatment is a serious scandal.

  • by Tablizer (95088) on Sunday May 26, 2013 @06:27PM (#43829149) Homepage Journal

    Congress should pass an adjusted law and move on rather than making it a witch hunt. Trying to milk it as a "dirty conspiracy" will just pull BOTH parties (deeper) into the mud.

    Computerized gerrymandering is part of the problem: politicians redraw their own districts to be slanted politically so that all they have to do is kiss up to extremists to get re-elected rather than do real work.

    • Computerized gerrymandering is part of the problem: politicians redraw their own districts to be slanted politically so that all they have to do is kiss up to extremists to get re-elected rather than do real work.

      They don't have to kiss up to extremists, or do anything. With a well enough gerrymandered district the Democrats or Republicans could run a dead slug and he'd get elected. The 2012 redistricting did this where I live. Instead of adjusting the congressional districts, they completely redrew them. At least it was bipartisan - we now have a guaranteed Democratic district and a guaranteed Republican district.

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