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USA Calling For the Extradition of Snowden 955

Posted by samzenpus
from the we-want-a-word-with-you dept.
Taco Cowboy writes "Edward Snowden, the leaker who gave us the evidence of US government spying on its people is under threat of being extradited back to the U.S. to face prosecution. Some people in Congress, including Republican Peter King (R-NY), are calling for his extradition from Hong Kong to face trial. From the article: 'A spokesman for the director of national intelligence, James Clapper, said Snowden's case had been referred to the justice department and US intelligence was assessing the damage caused by the disclosures. "Any person who has a security clearance knows that he or she has an obligation to protect classified information and abide by the law," the spokesman, Shawn Turner, said.'"
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USA Calling For the Extradition of Snowden

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  • by spacepimp (664856) on Monday June 10, 2013 @07:59AM (#43960219) Homepage
    I assume they are worried about what else he plans on releasing. If he has much more damning evidence (Which I assume he does) they want to get into the fold of Mother USA's arms to squeeze... hug him into silence before he says much more.
  • by mschiller (764721) on Monday June 10, 2013 @08:02AM (#43960237)

    We have an obligation to do what is right and proper above any other law. In the sense of the USA government, the Constitution is the highest law and lies out what is right and proper. If our government is unjust and doing something unethical and against the constitution, then we must first do what is right and proper to protect the constitution.

    Our Government is given power by the people, if they steal powers without consent of the governn than the highest law calls us to correct the misdeed and that trumps the laws on secrecy, etc. A soldier need not follow an illegal order!

    Now that being said: Breaking confidentiality on top-secret stuff is no laughing matter. It's treason, a capital offense. But that doesn't mean we aren't called to follow the higher law if the top-secret stuff is in itself illegal.

  • by Chris Mattern (191822) on Monday June 10, 2013 @08:07AM (#43960301)

    Now that being said: Breaking confidentiality on top-secret stuff is no laughing matter. It's treason, a capital offense.

    It's no laughing matter, but it's not treason. Treason is defined in the Constitution and this ain't it.

  • by Shavano (2541114) on Monday June 10, 2013 @08:13AM (#43960357)
    https://petitions.whitehouse.gov/petition/pardon-edward-snowden/Dp03vGYD879 [whitehouse.gov] --- 8979 signed on in two days.
    Also, over 4000 for repeal of the PATRIOT act so far and over 2000 for the impeachment of Roger Vinson, whose signature authorized some ridiculously broad data collection orders. And 11825 for the resignation of President Obama. I mention this last because people have been calling for his head for years and it's not clear what issue is the biggest factor in people calling for his resignation.
  • by mschiller (764721) on Monday June 10, 2013 @08:14AM (#43960375)

    Oh there is plenty of stuff that probably justifies a top secret stamp.

    Examples:
    1) Landing location for a major offensive in a declared war. [Eg how much better could Germany have prepared, in WWII, if they knew exactly which beaches we were planning on using and what day we were going to launch our offensive...]
    2) Technical specifications for NEW military hardware
    ===> Once the hardware is out there for a few years, say 7 years, the secret rating probably isn't as justified
    3) Technical specifications for Nuclear bombs (no age limit...)
    4) Identities of Our Spies operating in foreign countries
    ===> Note, I'm not stating that spying on folks is a correct thing. But if you accept that we must do it, because everyone else does it, then the spies identities must also be protected.

    And probably lot's of other examples.

  • by some old guy (674482) on Monday June 10, 2013 @08:35AM (#43960645)

    I will happily trade your fascist fear-mongering for democratic freedom.

  • by Holi (250190) on Monday June 10, 2013 @08:49AM (#43960839)

    The only way this is a crime is if actual information is released that hurts national defense. Congress has repeatedly resisted or failed to make the disclosing of classified information illegal, in and of itself.

    I am not sure one could consider this national defense information.

  • by erroneus (253617) on Monday June 10, 2013 @08:50AM (#43960853) Homepage

    Contractor use is how they get around other aspects of US and [especially] Constitutional legal restrictions and limitations.

    Problem with the military code, rules or laws? No problem -- hire contractors. Got a problem with accountability and being tracked or with requirements of reporting your activities? Just use contractors. Easy to blame and easy to fire.

    Not shocking, but quite disgusting. We put these government controls into place to prevent all sorts of government abuse and they just route around it. And no one is called to the floor for these practices.

  • by rnturn (11092) on Monday June 10, 2013 @09:03AM (#43961021)

    ``To be fair, this program is currently legal. I don't think it will pass Constitutional muster if it ever hit the courts, but that hasn't happened yet.''

    Yeah. It's legal because the U.S. Govt. says it's legal. The justification for this supposed legality is, of course, contained in a classified document. So we're just supposed to trust the govt. on this. IMHO, the govt. hasn't earned that level of trust on this.

    ``The appropriate course of action would be to challenge this law in the courts rather than releasing classified data.

    This was tried already a few years ago, AFAIR, in response the secret room in the AT&T facility on the West coast. The case was thrown out because they couldn't prove that they were spied upon by a secret spying program.

  • by Nadaka (224565) on Monday June 10, 2013 @09:05AM (#43961051)

    This man is a hero. He is providing the transparency and accountability that Obama promised and failed to deliver after he sold out the liberals who got him elected.

  • by wytcld (179112) on Monday June 10, 2013 @09:09AM (#43961125) Homepage

    To be fair, this program is currently legal. I don't think it will pass Constitutional muster if it ever hit the courts, but that hasn't happened yet. The appropriate course of action would be to challenge this law in the courts rather than releasing classified data.

    You're aware that the ACLU and others have repeatedly tried to bring this before the courts, and been shut down by the Obama's people claiming that, since the program is so secret, whoever is bringing suit can't prove that the program specifically harmed them, and so has no legal standing to even make the case before a court? The courts, by accepting the argument that no one has standing to challenge these practices, have avoided having to rule on the Constitutionality of it all.

    Your "appropriate course of action" has been tried. It doesn't work, not because the courts rule these programs Constitutional, but because the courts accept Obama's argument that truly secret programs are beyond court review. If your view of the Constitution is that any law that infringes on our rights can be challenged in court, then you must accept that the courts, just as much as the administration, have found ways to slip outside the Constitution's bounds and responsibilities.

    So the appropriate course of action, in your view, given this, is ... what?

  • by guibaby (192136) on Monday June 10, 2013 @09:21AM (#43961269)

    No...I am not shocked. I worked for a defense contractor as contractor from another company. I had clearance. Its pretty common. There are several levels of clearance. Everyone knows about secret and top secret, but there are other levels that don't even have names. In addition to that, you have compartmentalization through program clearance. Which basically means, even if you have super duper top secret clearance, you still don't get to see anything until you are briefed on the specific rules of the specific program. The government hire contractors like BH for their ability to specialize.

  • by s.petry (762400) on Monday June 10, 2013 @09:33AM (#43961477)
    The US is not a democracy, it's a Republic. Learn the difference!
  • First they came (Score:5, Informative)

    by stewsters (1406737) on Monday June 10, 2013 @09:43AM (#43961661)
    First they came for the communists,
    and I didn't speak out because I wasn't a communist.

    Then they came for the human rights activists,
    and I didn't speak out because I wasn't a human rights activist.

    Then they came for the terrorists,
    and I didn't speak out because I wasn't a terrorists.

    Then they came for the people with Verizon,
    and I didn't speak out because I don't like getting charged that much for a phone plan.

    Then they came for me,
    and there was no one left to speak for me.
  • by nedlohs (1335013) on Monday June 10, 2013 @09:47AM (#43961717)

    The "professionals" didn't have clearance to see it so yes he dumped everything.

  • by cphilo (768807) on Monday June 10, 2013 @09:50AM (#43961775)

    https://petitions.whitehouse.gov/petition/pardon-edward-snowden/Dp03vGYD879 [whitehouse.gov] --- 404 Page not found The page you're looking for is currently unavailable to view We've been upgrading our site. It is possible that this page has been moved or renamed. You can use your browser's Back button to return to the previous page, go to the homepage, or you can browse or search for the information you're looking for. If you think that you have reached this page due to an error on our part, please let us know.

  • by jimbolauski (882977) on Monday June 10, 2013 @09:51AM (#43961781) Journal

    Oh yeah, unsafe driver and betraying democracy... same thing. Seriously, this guy is a criminal and should face the consequences of his actions.

    Here is the thing the guy signed a document saying that he would protect classified information which he did not, that is a crime. The guy also signed a document saying he would protect the constitution which he may be able to argue he did by becoming a whistle blower. I this the constitutionality of this law is upheld this guy is fucked but overturned he would be protected.

  • by NatasRevol (731260) on Monday June 10, 2013 @09:57AM (#43961881) Journal

    Warrants were not served.

    The Supreme Court already ruled that warrantless GPS tracking is unconstitutional.
    http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2012/01/supreme-court-holds-warrantless-gps-tracking-unconstitutional/ [arstechnica.com]

  • by Trepidity (597) <(gro.hsikcah) (ta) (todhsals-muiriled)> on Monday June 10, 2013 @10:03AM (#43961959)

    One reason Peter King sees terrorists everywhere is that he personally has a history [washingtonpost.com] of fundraising and offering political support for terrorist groups. A bit of projection, perhaps.

  • by jedidiah (1196) on Monday June 10, 2013 @11:03AM (#43962761) Homepage

    > That depends on your definition of right.
    > Acting without a common definition is anarchy.

    We have such a framework:

          Common Sense
          The Declaration of Independence
          The Federalist Papers
          The US Constitution.
          Civil Disobedience

  • by NobleSavage (582615) on Monday June 10, 2013 @11:42AM (#43963253)
    Sign petition here [whitehouse.gov]
  • by s.petry (762400) on Monday June 10, 2013 @08:07PM (#43968419)

    Stop making stuff up, wholly shit it's easy to read his dossier. He was at the contracting company for 3 months before fleeing to Hong Kong and releasing. Prior to this job, he was a computer security person at the CIA, and prior to that a security guard at a Government agency. Who knows what he was doing at the CIA, but he was not there long and not a Guru. Look at the work experience! Before being a security guard, he was in the US Army and released because he broke both legs in an accident.

    If your opinion is based on a lie, well... shame on you for not checking basic facts.

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