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US and Russia Set Up Cyber Cold War Hotline 72

Posted by samzenpus
from the don't-say-that-you're-the-more-sorry-than-I-am-because-I-am-capable-of-being-just-as-sorry-as-you-ar dept.
judgecorp writes "In a move reminiscent of the 1960s Cold War days, Presidents Obama and Putin have set up a hotline between their respective cyber-security authorities, to defuse any possible crises and prevent them from escalating into an online equivalent of the Cuban Missile Crisis. 'We recognise that threats to or in the use of ICTs include political-military and criminal threats, as well as threats of a terrorist nature, and are some of the most serious national and international security challenges we face in the 21st Century,' a joint statement from the presidents read."
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US and Russia Set Up Cyber Cold War Hotline

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  • ... hotline call YOU!
  • The problem is China/West. China has been cracking the west for over a decade (though I blame W for forcing the gov to be on Windows). Things are heating up now, esp. with Snowden's BS.
    • by Anonymous Coward

      America soon to be the only country in all history to go to nuclear war over IP theft.

      • America soon to be the only country in all history to go to nuclear war over IP theft.

        US: We didn't launch the nukes at you Russia! Chinese hackers did it while we were distracted by a huge PRISM!

    • by beckett (27524) on Thursday June 20, 2013 @01:28AM (#44057937) Homepage Journal
      you claim China has been 'cracking the west', and yet you conveniently ignore stuxnet and flame [ieee.org]. you're more pissed off at a whistleblower's "BS" than plain evidence the US government has been engaging in rampant data mining and surveillance on a global scale.

      China is the new 'enemy' that the US has been waiting for since the end of the Cold War. No doubt this escalating rivalry will drive the development and purchase of a new generation of military equipment, and justify the US government exerting unilateral control over ever more aspects of online activity and identity. Rest easy: we'll all continue to enjoy unending war in our lifetimes.
      • I see this attitude ALL THE TIME and it never fails to baffle me. Because someone thinks that China is the new boogeyman, that means that China must not be hacking at all. It's all about the all-powerful US government boogeyman instead! (newsflash, Obama is the good guy, the media is on his side these days)
        • by beckett (27524)

          I see this attitude ALL THE TIME and it never fails to baffle me. Because someone thinks that China is the new boogeyman, that means that China must not be hacking at all. It's all about the all-powerful US government boogeyman instead!

          Note you're the only person that said that "China must not be hacking at all": neither me nor GP said this. congratulations on your hasty strawman creation.

          (newsflash, Obama is the good guy, the media is on his side these days)

          If you continue to think in binary "good guy, bad guy" terms, we'll never get past this caveman "us vs them". The first things you should check at the door is any notion of American exceptionalism, and your blind faith in "the media".

    • I'm getting a little bit tired of this anti-Chinese constant racism when we have to deal with online stuff. Most of the SPAM is sent from USA, though there's always someone to claim it's coming mainly from China (which is completely false these days, China only ranks nine on the top 10 spammers). Here, we're seeing the same thing. USA is the country with the biggest government sponsored hacks, and by far. Also, it's well known to all Chinese that the government is spying on its people. The government doesn'
  • Is it Vetted? (Score:5, Interesting)

    by mitcheli (894743) on Wednesday June 19, 2013 @11:44PM (#44057561)
    If memory serves, a group of small Russian children presented one of our embassies a gift of a beautiful wooden state seal to hang on the wall. Unbeknown to anyone in the embassy at the time, it contained a small passive bug built within and that allowed the Russians to listen in to priviledged embassy conversations. The seal is now hanging up a the NSA museum in Columbia, Maryland. So the question is, who made the phones for this hotline?
    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward

      The Seal Bug [spybusters.com] was just one bug. Later, the Soviets kindly built us an embassy with bugs built into the very concrete of the walls [airforcemag.com].

    • by z0idberg (888892)

      Do you really think the USA side would need specific hardware installed from the Russian side to setup a hotline (or vice versa).....Or do you think they would use their own hardware and it is just the actual line that is common?

      • Re:Is it Vetted? (Score:4, Informative)

        by tlambert (566799) on Thursday June 20, 2013 @01:47AM (#44057997)

        Do you really think the USA side would need specific hardware installed from the Russian side to setup a hotline (or vice versa).....Or do you think they would use their own hardware and it is just the actual line that is common?

        In fact, yes, they do, because the US doesn't trust that the Russian encryption isn't crackable, and vice versa. So as of 2010, there's been a joint encryption agreement in place for the White House/Kremlin hotline, and the same technology is being deployed in this case as well. Specifically the GRU and SVR in Russia, and their opposite numbers in the US. The agreed upon solution was to use cryptosystems from both countries on the communications.

        "More recently, the United States and Russia agreed on new joint encryption arrangements for the forty-year-old hotline between the Kremlin and the White House. Moreover, American and Russian banks already cooperate in secure digital communications for international transfers of staggeringly large sums of money."

        See this 2010 report for details, specifically, the executive summary beginning on page 7:
        http://www.ewi.info/system/files/USRussiaCyber_WEB.pdf [ewi.info]

    • Bugs are so old tech now. For 20 years they've been bouncing lasers off windows and decoding the audio vibrations.

    • If memory serves, a group of small Russian children presented one of our embassies a gift of a beautiful wooden state seal to hang on the wall. Unbeknown to anyone in the embassy at the time, it contained a small passive bug built within and that allowed the Russians to listen in to priviledged embassy conversations. The seal is now hanging up a the NSA museum in Columbia, Maryland. So the question is, who made the phones for this hotline?

      China of course...

  • This is an onion article, right? Right? Please.... please.... please tell me this is an onion article...
  • joshua

  • How convenient, hot and cold running war...

  • Hello? ... Ah ... I can't hear too well. Do you suppose you could turn the music down just a little? ... Oh-ho, that's much better. ... yeah ... huh ... yes ... Fine, I can hear you now, Vladimir. ... Clear and plain and coming through fine....I'm coming through fine, too, eh? ... Good, then ... well, then, as you say, we're both coming through fine. ... Good. ... Well, it's good that you're fine and ... and I'm fine. ... I agree with you, it's great to be fine. ... a-ha-ha-ha-ha ... Now then, Vladimir, you

  • Cyberway arms race (Score:5, Interesting)

    by faustoc4 (2766155) on Thursday June 20, 2013 @12:01AM (#44057651)
    This only confirms an article by Bruce Schneir that I just read, he surmises if the U.S has started a secret cyberwar arms race putting all internet infrastructure at perils. http://edition.cnn.com/2013/06/18/opinion/schneier-cyberwar-policy/index.html [cnn.com] "... advance U.S. national objectives around the world with little or no warning to the adversary or target and with potential effects ranging from subtle to severely damaging" fuckers
  • Cyber war games (Score:2, Insightful)

    by gmuslera (3436)
    The only way to win is that no one plays it. But as there is a player (i.e. the elephant/donkey on the room that is US), everyone lose. And i don't mean government or citizens of some particular nation, i mean mankind as a whole.
    • by Anonymous Coward

      But as there is a player (i.e. the elephant/donkey on the room that is US), everyone lose.

      So you're dumb enough to ignore something like this [nytimes.com] and put all of the blame on the US. Let me guess, you're not from the US, yet you'll use the Internet which WE invented (and don't get me started on Berners-Lee; he simply wrote an implementation of the ideas and research of Bush, Engelbart, and Nelson).

      Yes, it's always the Yankees fault. Quit using the net if you don't like it and move back to your cave.

  • Nice timing. (Score:5, Interesting)

    by chrullrich (111050) on Thursday June 20, 2013 @12:11AM (#44057681) Homepage

    It certainly is no accident that today is the 50th anniversary of the agreement to set up the original Hot Line.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      Yeah, coming on the heels of Obama's JFK-redux speech in Berlin, one of the defining Cold War moments. There's a conscious effort on to portray Obama as a Cold War leader. Certainly an abrupt departure from earlier characterizations like the US-Russian "reset" (an annoying metaphor—as if the world were a video game that you could reset at will whenever you didn't like your position).

      So the question is, who is the new Cold Opponent? Who is the Evil Empire? And does all this justify PRISM or somethi

      • There's a conscious effort on to portray Obama as a Cold War leader.

        Obama has always portrayed himself as MLK's "dream" and JFK's ghost all rolled into one. Not dissimilar to how Jesus portrayed himself as the "lamb" that was prophesied in the old testament. He certainly has the eloquence of the civil rights leaders but it will be a couple of generations before anyone can tell if he has had as much significance.

        The recent UN compromise between Putin & Obama to work towards a caretaker government in Syria looks promising from a humanitarian and civil rights POV, but i

  • ...and your enemies closer.

  • by goffster (1104287) on Thursday June 20, 2013 @12:35AM (#44057769)

    @putin, WTF is up with goddamn @assad?
    @obama, you have no proof #WMD.
    @putin, no proof, WTF were those #sarin loaded missles?
    @obama, perhaps #israel fired them and put blame on #syria.
    @putin, you are a pussy.

    • @obama, what are you wearing? @putin, the commander in chief goes commando, no briefs
      • In the dark ages, Putin (ex: KGB 'commando') would have sailed to the US on a Viking boat, personally kicked the crap out of Bush/Obama, and told Americans they would all have to get used to being paid in vodka.
        • by gl4ss (559668)

          In the dark ages, Putin (ex: KGB 'commando') would have sailed to the US on a Viking boat, personally kicked the crap out of Bush/Obama, and told Americans they would all have to get used to being paid in vodka.

          Oh.. a funny story relating to that. Vikings were used in pacification of Russia into Russia.

  • FTFA:

    In a move eerily reminiscent of the Cold War, the US and Russia have set up a hotline to avoid an accidental or catastrophic cyber war, after two years of discussing how best to collaborate on online threats.

    The two companies want to “reduce the possibility that a misunderstood cyber incident could create instability or a crisis in our bilateral relationship”, according to a fact sheet from the White House.

    Both Russia and the US are hotbeds of cyber criminal activity, and both are thoug

  • Because it's not like the US and Russia are the ones consistently at each others' throats over alleged cyber attacks.

  • just set up a facebook group?

  • I can see it mainly being used to request information on citizens than aren't allowed to be spied on by their own government. I'm sure Downing Street will be getting involved in this too.

  • Every time I read about setting up hotlines between governments on various things, I think of this classic episode from Yes, Prime Minister, "The Grand Design."

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=diuQiXt5qE4#t=45s [youtube.com]

    Prime Minister: So in an emergency I can get straight through to the Soviet president?

    General: Theoretically, yes.

    PM: Theoretically?

    General: It's what we tell journalists. Ha Ha Ha. In fact we did once get through to the Kremlin, but only to a switchboard operator.

    PM: C

  • On a tour of the Joint Intelligence facilities in the Pentagon many (15) years ago, we got to walk past the room with the actual hotline (it's not in the White House, or even some buried secret Pentagon sub-basement.) It's a closet with a door with a bored-looking officer in there, along with a teletype. It has a phone, but it was connected to the DoD phone system, not Russia.

Algol-60 surely must be regarded as the most important programming language yet developed. -- T. Cheatham

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