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Map of Publicly-Funded Creationism Teaching 544

Posted by samzenpus
from the everything-I-needed-to-know dept.
Capt.Albatross writes "At Slate, Chris Kirk presents a map of schools in the USA that both receive public funding and teach creationism. It also shows public schools in those states where they are allowed to teach creationism (without necessarily implying that creationism is taught in all public schools of those states). There is a brief outline of the regulations in those states where this occurs, but the amounts involved are not discussed."
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Map of Publicly-Funded Creationism Teaching

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  • by lgw (121541) on Monday January 27, 2014 @06:09PM (#46085723) Journal

    For all the trash that gets talked about Texas in this regard, it barely registers here, and only for some sort of "Responsive Ed charter school" that a Texan might explain better - sounds like it's not the normal school system.

    Louisiana and Tennessee OTOH - ouch!

    • by Anonymous Coward on Monday January 27, 2014 @06:21PM (#46085839)

      To be fair, what the image is showing is deceptive. Both states you mention have "teach the controversy" laws that apply to Public Schools, while Texas is showing the specific charter schools.

    • by Mashiki (184564) <mashiki@NOsPam.gmail.com> on Monday January 27, 2014 @06:30PM (#46085963) Homepage

      What I find interesting on the map is the lack of "other religious" institutions that also support the ideology. They don't list muslim schools in VA, MD, or DC, or those in TN, or WI(many of which get public funding or falls under vouchers. But they list the various christian denominations...odd...how very odd. They don't list the Jewish schools either.

      • by the gnat (153162)

        What I find interesting on the map is the lack of "other religious" institutions that also support the ideology. They don't list muslim schools in VA, MD, or DC, or those in TN, or WI(many of which get public funding or falls under vouchers. But they list the various christian denominations...odd...how very odd. They don't list the Jewish schools either.

        Maybe the Muslim and Jewish schools don't waste time teaching pseudoscience?

        • by Mashiki (184564)

          Maybe the Muslim and Jewish schools don't waste time teaching pseudoscience?

          Not sure if troll, or willfully ignorant. Even up here in Canadaland, you find Muslim schools teaching pseudoscience. Not so much the Jewish ones unless they're ultra-orthodox.

          • by the gnat (153162)

            Okay, let me rephrase that: do you have specific evidence that Muslim schools in the US are using public money to teach religiously-motivated pseudoscience? Because if they are, please, by all means name and shame, and complain to the NCSE and ACLU and appropriate school boards. I can pretty much guarantee that no actual scientist is going to defend them.

          • by the eric conspiracy (20178) on Monday January 27, 2014 @08:36PM (#46087033)

            The Quran does not contain a complete chronology of creation, and Muslim scholars do not believe in Young Earth creationism.

            The primary gap between Islam and Evolutionary Biology is the origin of man, which is treated as directly the result of actual intervention by God.

      • by fermion (181285) on Monday January 27, 2014 @07:22PM (#46086463) Homepage Journal
        I don't know if muslim or jewish schools teach fake science. I doubt they use curriculum and books for Fox News to talk about the white man is inferior because he did not have stirrup until about 1000 years after Asia. I know that Talmudic and sharia law is the bugaboo of the evangelical christian, and this is probably what is taking about here, using public money to teach these values. But here is news. There is not much daylight between evangelical and other fanatical religious laws. They all want to control when we enjoy ourselves, they all want to control women, and they all want a select few to control what we know. In any case, this is speaking of very specific topic, which is teaching creationism using public funds. One would have to provide evidence that schools other than evangelical Christians are doing such things in a rigorous manner. For instance get a worksheet that is corrected when the student says he prays to allah instead of a christian g-d. As far as the Texas thing is concerned, Texas is not a state where one can be a total dumbass and still succeed. There are only so many MBA or drug sales jobs for the evangelical scientific illiterate person. Schlumberger and BP are not going to tolerate the average public school teacher educating kids in fake science. The oil patch needs people who can build electronics, not pray for a strike.
      • by Guppy06 (410832) on Monday January 27, 2014 @08:44PM (#46087083)

        Sola scriptura [wikipedia.org] , upon which Creationism generally relies, is a decidedly Western, Protestant idea. Other Christian denominations and other Mosaic faiths have additional sacred traditions they rely upon that prevent scripture from being the exclusive source of absolute truth, from being interpreted completely literally, or a combination of the two.

        But if you can cite examples of public funds being used to teach other faiths' creation myths as scientific fact in the Untied States, please feel free to post them.

    • by cusco (717999)

      The alternative is not teaching either one. I asked nephews in northern Michigan when they were in 10th grade what they had learned about evolution and got nothing but a blank stare back. The topic had never been covered in all their science classes up to that point, I don't know if it even got touched on the last two years. In those same schools I learned about evolution in 3rd or 4th grade (about 1972)

    • by Wycliffe (116160)

      Louisiana and Tennessee OTOH - ouch!

      That map is extremely deceptive. The green dots are ALL the public schools in that state. They are allowed to but that doesn't necessarily mean they do and it would be unconstitutional to pass a law banning it. My guess is that most the schools in LA and TN don't. The red/orange dots are PRIVATE schools that accept school vouchers. That is a school voucher debate not a creationism debate. Personally I am supportive of vouchers to allow students to pick the school they would like to attend. That actually s

  • Map (Score:5, Funny)

    by rossdee (243626) on Monday January 27, 2014 @06:19PM (#46085819)

    on presumably a flat earth

  • "The amounts involved are not discussed" because this is a non-story. I spent (served time?) 12 Years in a Tennessee school in a highly populated area and creationism was not taught at all. This article intends to imply that us backwards rednecks are teachin' the chillrens 'bout Jesus, and that simply isn't happening to the statewide scale this fancy map displays.
  • by coolsnowmen (695297) on Monday January 27, 2014 @06:26PM (#46085897)

    First read the bills slate.com gives as evidence.
    http://ncse.com/files/pub/lega... [ncse.com]
    http://www.capitol.tn.gov/Bill... [tn.gov]

    Now, show me where it says, "teach creationism".

    I'm not saying they are wrong, and that LA/TN aren't teach creationism; but those laws seem to protect teachers from getting fired for teaching [locally controversial] science the way I read them (as long as they don't explicitly say, "you're religion is wrong").

    • by iluvcapra (782887)

      In your first link:

      C. A teacher shall teach the material presented in the standard textbook supplied by the school system and thereafter may use supplemental textbooks and other instructional materials to help students understand, analyze, critique, and review scientific theories in an objective manner, as permitted by the city, parish, or other local public school board.

      It's been made clear that teachers are permitted to bring Bibles into the science class as "other instructional materials." Bobby Jindal [salon.com]

  • by allcoolnameswheretak (1102727) on Monday January 27, 2014 @06:34PM (#46086005)

    What happened to you U.S.A? You used to be cool.

  • Arizona: As many as 15 schools that teach creationism may be participating in the state’s tax credit scholarship program for disabled children or children attending underperforming schools. (Arizona has not released a list of private schools that have received students on this scholarship.)

    READ: There are 15 schools in Arizona that teach creationism (*sigh*), and they are apparently eligible to receive tax credits for certain disadvantaged students on a scholarship, but there's no data that says any of these schools actually have any of those students.

    The Slate doesn't mention this, but there's a WAY bigger loophole.

    You can, in Arizona (as well as a lot of other places) donate up to $200 per person (or $400 per household, IIRC) to a school fully tax deductible from your state taxes. As long

    • by mythosaz (572040)

      ....in case it wasn't clear in my post, you don't actually need a child in school. Anyone can donate $200 to a specific school in Arizona (grade school, high school, charter school) and reduce their Arizona tax liability by $200.

    • 15 schools in Arizona that teach creationism...and they are apparently eligible to receive tax credits for certain disadvantaged students

      They are disadvantaged: they don't know evolution.

    • by the gnat (153162)

      So, as long as it's a valid school, you can use state money (in a roundabout way) to pay for their creationism.

      That's hardly unique, though - contributions to approved* religious institutions are tax-deductible, presumably on the basis that many religions require tithing (by those who can afford it, anyway), and taxing people on their religious contributions would be interfering with their religious practices. That's always been my assumption, anyway; maybe it was part of a deal to get the income tax enact

  • Creationism basically equates God to a Las Vegas Magician. They can't seem to believe that God is capable of making a complex system such as Evolution and instead need to provide a simplified dumb-downed theory. God, if he exists, should be insulted.
  • by i_want_you_to_throw_ (559379) on Tuesday January 28, 2014 @09:36AM (#46090083) Homepage Journal
    As long as Louisiana schools are teaching it using Louisiana tax money why should I care? I'm in Maryland. Let 'em waste their money any way they see fit.

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