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Firefox 27 Released: TLS 1.2 Support, SPDY 3.1, SocialAPI Improvements 167

Posted by Soulskill
from the onward-and-upward dept.
jones_supa writes "Mozilla has released Firefox 27 for Linux, Android, Mac, and Windows (download). One of the big changes is enabling support for TLS 1.1 and 1.2 by default. Firefox 27 also supports the SPDY 3.1 protocol. Developers got some new toys: support was added for ES6 generators in SpiderMonkey, the debugger will de-obfuscate JavaScript, and style sheets can be reset by using all:unset. Mozilla also announced some new social integration options. In addition to all these changes, the Android version got some UI improvements and font readability upgrades. For a future release, Mozilla is currently testing a new approach for Firefox Sync in Nightly builds. They recognized the headaches involved with how it works, and they're now opting to use a simple e-mail and password combination like Google Chrome does. In the old system, users were forced to store an auto-generated authorization code, which, if lost, would render their bookmarks, passwords and browsing history inaccessible. "
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Firefox 27 Released: TLS 1.2 Support, SPDY 3.1, SocialAPI Improvements

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  • Re:Do not want ... (Score:5, Informative)

    by 0racle (667029) on Tuesday February 04, 2014 @03:03PM (#46152859)
    Did you see them before? This release didn't add them, it added more. Personally I have no idea where they are.
  • by chipschap (1444407) on Tuesday February 04, 2014 @03:16PM (#46153037)
    I used Chrome for quite a while but just switched back to Firefox. Chrome restricts things like downloading media (especially from YouTube) and doesn't work correctly on some ecommerce sites that I use. Firefox isn't (subjectively) that much slower than Chrome any longer and clearly has the widest choice of add-ons.
  • Re:Do not want ... (Score:5, Informative)

    by Billly Gates (198444) on Tuesday February 04, 2014 @03:40PM (#46153373) Journal

    I don't use social media so could care less about bloatware.

    I just want FF's memory leak to be fixed instead of the devs ignoring it version after version, year after year.

    Chrome's "Task Manager" that shows per tab it's Name, Memory, CPU Usage, Network Traffic and FPS still lacks any counter part in FF.

    Chrome uses more ram than any other browser according to benchmarks. FF the least. A lot has changed since 2011.

  • by Billly Gates (198444) on Tuesday February 04, 2014 @03:42PM (#46153413) Journal

    Chrome uses almost 300% more ram than FF or IE 11 on my system when I have +40 tabs opened.

    Tomshardware.com did some benchmarks that can confirm this. It even hit slashdot that FF 13 used the least amount of ram a year and a half ago.

    FF 4.0 != FF 25 and later and a lot has changed since 2011. I am tempted to switch back to Firefox as it is so light and quick now.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday February 04, 2014 @03:47PM (#46153481)

    The GTK3 support seems to be coming along nicely. They're actually supposedly pretty close, if I'm reading the bug tickets correctly. They mostly just have to support spinning off GTK2 process for plugins like Flash that don't support GTK3, and I believe there are some GTK3 widget glitches to iron out. I even remember seeing a Red Hat/Fedora test binary with GTK3 support that you can try out, though I don't have a link handy.

  • Re:Do not want ... (Score:2, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday February 04, 2014 @03:54PM (#46153567)

    "I just want FF's memory leak to be fixed instead of the devs ignoring it version after version, year after year."
    Do you happen to have a bug number on bugzilla? Also, please start reading Nicolas Nethercote's blog, they fixed a sh*tload of leaks already.

    "Chrome's "Task Manager" that shows per tab it's Name, Memory, CPU Usage, Network Traffic and FPS still lacks any counter part in FF."
    Content elements of separate pages can be shared in FF, making a per-page memory report much harder than in the per-process Chrome.

  • by tlhIngan (30335) <slashdot@wSLACKWAREorf.net minus distro> on Tuesday February 04, 2014 @04:28PM (#46154045)

    One of the biggest changes in Firefox was that JavaScript was permanently enabled.

    But a side effect of the removal of "Enable JavaScript" checkbox was the removal of the "Advanced" button which limited what scripts could do - move/resize windows, bring windows to front/back, allow scrpits to write to status bar, disable context-click (right click), etc.

    Which is annoying because those options were good to have - especially sites that disable right-click.

    On Firefox, it's possible to re-enable right click if you hold down Shift then right-click - this will force Firefox to display the proper right-click menu. But that's a PITA

    While extensions like NoScript work, they don't prevent permitted sites from playing around with stuff like that - a site needs javascript ot work and then they promptly open a bunch of windows or disable right-click while it's enabled.

  • Re:DANE (Score:5, Informative)

    by vanyel (28049) * on Tuesday February 04, 2014 @04:57PM (#46154483) Journal

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/D... [wikipedia.org]

    "Mozilla Firefox via add-on" - a start at least...

  • Re: Sync (Score:5, Informative)

    by c0l0 (826165) * on Tuesday February 04, 2014 @05:17PM (#46154775) Homepage

    Yeah, I knew about that possibility before, but since the data to be stored on Mozilla servers was being properly encrypted on my device and in my client, I opted out of the usual "maintain my own infrastructure" chores that one time. Now, the "old" (read: current) Firefox Sync system is going away completely in the not too distant future, and you'll probably have to install some kind of add-on to keep your existing, self-hosted infrastructure functional. Meanwhile, I asked some Mozilla people/developers what the change was about, and how the new system is supposed to keep users' data confidential. The transcript of the IRC session is available here, on Debian's inofficial pastebin [debian.net] - enjoy! :)

  • Re:Do not want ... (Score:5, Informative)

    by complete loony (663508) <Jeremy.LakemanNO@SPAMgmail.com> on Tuesday February 04, 2014 @06:27PM (#46155867)
    It's called "about:memory" and it shows you memory allocation in all kinds of fine or coarse grained ways. And it's been almost continually improved for the past couple of years, while the big issues this page has revealed have been fixed.
  • Re: Sync (Score:5, Informative)

    by c0l0 (826165) * on Tuesday February 04, 2014 @08:19PM (#46157109) Homepage

    The new server code/service building blocks are already (at least in part) available: https://github.com/mozilla/fxa... [github.com] https://github.com/mozilla/fxa... [github.com] - there's probably more, but mozila shares so much on github I don't really know what to look for.

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