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Businesses Bitcoin The Almighty Buck

Silk Road 2.0 Pledges To Compensate Users For Stolen Bitcoins 84

Posted by timothy
from the but-they'll-do-it-bit-by-bit dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Online black market Silk Road 2.0 has pledged to pay back more than £1.7 million worth of bitcoins stolen from its servers during a heist last week. Speaking in a post on Reddit, Silk Road 2.0 moderator Defcon said the website would refund the more than 4,000 bitcoins stolen during the heist, and would not pay its staff until users had been reimbursed."
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Silk Road 2.0 Pledges To Compensate Users For Stolen Bitcoins

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  • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday February 18, 2014 @09:31AM (#46275251)

    Now only if Bank of America or Target would do the same for it's users... isn't it funny that there's more honesty in underground markets compared to corporate capitalist America?

  • DF? (Score:0, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday February 18, 2014 @09:39AM (#46275295)

    Those crooked mother fuckers "I mean that in a good way" have more morals than the majority of legal companies.

  • In other news (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Chas (5144) on Tuesday February 18, 2014 @09:46AM (#46275361) Homepage Journal

    Silk Road 2.0 employees desert after they learn they are not getting paid.
    Several turn turn over information to law enforcement...

  • by bobbied (2522392) on Tuesday February 18, 2014 @09:56AM (#46275439)

    Seriously? You actually *think* SilkRoad is going to be able to not pay it's employees and stay in operation?

    What if Target claimed they'd take 100% of their profits and 100% of their payroll to pay off some debt that was bigger than a year's worth of sales? Do you figure that would be a good thing too?

    BTW, Target's liability for their lapses *will* be dealt with. End users will NOT be held accountable for charges they didn't authorize. One of the few protections of Credit Cards.

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