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Snowden A Hero? Gates Says No, Woz Says Yes 335

Posted by Soulskill
from the time-for-a-cage-match dept.
hcs_$reboot writes "In a lengthy interview from Rolling Stone, Bill Gates, was asked: 'Do you consider [Snowden] a hero or a traitor?' The Microsoft founder responded, 'I certainly wouldn't characterize him as a hero. ... You won't find much admiration from me'. What about government surveillance? 'The government has such ability to do these things. ... But the specific techniques they use become unavailable if they're discussed in detail. Rolling Stone retorts that privacy can be an issue: 'We want safety, but we also want privacy,' says the journalist. Bill Gates tells his main priority focuses on stopping the bad guys: 'Let's say you knew nothing was going on. How would you feel? I mean, seriously. I would be very worried. Technology arms the bad guys with orders of magnitude more [power]. Not just bad guys. Crazy guys.' Meanwhile, Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak expressed the opposite opinion about Snowden at a tech conference in Germany. 'He is a hero to me, but he may be a traitor to other people and I understand the reasons for them to think that way. I believe that Snowden believed, like I do, that the U.S. has a right to freedom. '"
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Snowden A Hero? Gates Says No, Woz Says Yes

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  • by rubycodez (864176) on Saturday March 15, 2014 @11:37AM (#46492395)

    yes, technology has certainly armed you, Bill Gates, you twisted evil fuck

    • I keep forgetting the proper term is "evil twisted fund" --- thanx
    • by Jane Q. Public (1010737) on Saturday March 15, 2014 @03:36PM (#46494207)

      "yes, technology has certainly armed you, Bill Gates, you twisted evil fuck"

      Well, this certainly does illustrate how much Bill Gates is actually a closet Statist. But those who have followed what the Bill & Melinda Gates foundation do already knew that. At first I was happy to see Gates spending much of his fortune on "charity"... until I learned what they were actually doing with the money.

      Like supporting "Common Core" education... which is worse than you probably think. Contrary to what supporters say, while it may not technically be a "government" program, the government had a heavy hand in its formation. And there is a lot more to the whole story.

      You can bet that if the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation is behind it, it has a Statist purpose.

      • by s.petry (762400) on Saturday March 15, 2014 @10:47PM (#46496197)

        The Gates foundation is just the last piece of exploitation for him. It really should take minutes to gather enough data to show that Bill Gates should not be used as a morality touch stone. He started by stealing a professors work, caused immense harm to the computer era, and does not mind harming people to get ahead. He is a liar, a cheat, a thief, and is working to undermine society pretty much every where he goes including his home (yes, Common Core is that bad).

        Asking Bill Gates if someone is a hero is akin to asking Bill Clinton about monogamy.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday March 15, 2014 @11:41AM (#46492417)

    Nobody. Absolutely NOBODY.

  • by Hey_Jude_Jesus (3442653) on Saturday March 15, 2014 @11:53AM (#46492521)
    The wealthy want to keep people under the control of the government, so they can increase their wealth and power over us.
    • by sgt_doom (655561)
      Thank you, Micro$oft donates to American Friends of Bilderberg, Inc., according to their tax returns (and this has been online for a number of years now, so don't any of the usual douchetard trolls request the link, you know how to use Google, morons), with the directors being David Rockefeller, international war criminal, Henry Kissinger and Richard Perle.
  • Neutrality (Score:5, Insightful)

    by king neckbeard (1801738) on Saturday March 15, 2014 @12:10PM (#46492633)
    Gates isn't exactly neutral on this matter. Companies as big as Microsoft don't happen without close friendships with the government, and those relationships get even closer when the company is let off easy in an anti-trust case. Even if he did support Snowden, he wouldn't be able to publicly state that.
    • Point taken. However, if he was less self-centered and money-grubbing then yes he could. Bill Gates just took a big hit to his reputation (in my book), and if it weren't for his support of anti-malarial and other research he wouldn't have much to show for.

  • by mx_mx_mx (1625481) on Saturday March 15, 2014 @12:27PM (#46492791)

    The more I admire Steve Wozniak. He is a true hero.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    To my knowledge, Snowden did not reveal how the NSA lawfully conducts its business within the mandates of the law. What Showden revealed were only the abusive and illegal activities that the NSA engages in. I'll go along with the notion that sometimes the government breaks the law for the greater good, but... spying on lawyers representing a foreign government in a legal case over shrimp imports? Spying on US-to-US emails if the routes inadvertently go overseas? Collaborating with intelligence agencies in

    • I'll go along with the notion that sometimes the government breaks the law for the greater good

      Why? The government, of all things, must follow the law (which obviously includes the constitution). I don't want a government that feels it can break the law and infringe upon people's individual liberties "for the greater good."

      • by fnj (64210)

        I was going to make a reply along those lines; that such are the attitudes that enable tyrannies, but on reflection I reconsidered. It is my belief that AC was driving in a different direction. I believe AC was indicating that governments sometimes have a case to make that one of their prime directives (defense of the nation) may lead them on occasion to skirt legalities. Please note, I am not saying the defense justifies the action in any particular case. I am saying what I believe AC was driving at: the N

  • by FunkyLich (2533348) on Saturday March 15, 2014 @12:31PM (#46492825)

    I can see the different viewpoints of those who say Snowden is a hero, and the others who say he is a villain. It is also a good thing to know that either group does agree that whatever the act of Snowden is labeled, it is a flagrant violation of the Constitution. This is still without getting out of the US worldview of things. If we suddenly 'retreat' a bit more to get into this 'field of view' not only the US, but the World as an entity, the US worldview should learn how to queue.

    But my main curiosity is this: We have two computer technology worldwide-known persons, who have expressed different opinions about the Snowden Saga. I wonder, why stop at them alone and not ask any further, how would other world-wide known computer technology persons see this matter? We could ask Larry Wall, Brian Kernighan, Bjarne Stroustrup, Larry Ellison... the more the better.

    THEN, we could mine this data set and maybe we could even find that there is some mysterious connection between beeing a famous computer guy AND success of wealth AND which of these have thick trade-pipes with governmental contracts which in turn loopback towards their welth.

    This way we would have way more accurate conclusions and much more credible ones. And with a much lower margin of error as the sampling set would be richer, supposing that the sampling set would not be cherry-picked.

  • The full sentence (Score:3, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Saturday March 15, 2014 @12:32PM (#46492829)

    The summary didn't include the full sentence by Gates. Just for completeness, he said: "I think he broke the law, so I certainly wouldn't characterize him as a hero."

    • Yes, Snowden broke the "law", a "law" that ANYone with half a brain could see violated the Constitution, DESPITE what the paid-off Congress and Judiciary say.. He stood up for the Constitution, and is a hero in my book, like many of the heroes from the first American Revolution.. I say "first revolution" because I'm damn sure we're well into the 2nd Revolution... I fear this one is gonna be MUCH bloodier than the first...

    • by vux984 (928602) on Saturday March 15, 2014 @02:12PM (#46493595)

      The summary didn't include the full sentence by Gates. Just for completeness, he said: "I think he broke the law, so I certainly wouldn't characterize him as a hero."

      I wonder if he applies that line of thinking to other heroes.

      Rosa Parks - broke the law
      Mahatma Gandi - broke the law
      Martin Luther King - broke the law
      Paul Revere ...
      John Hancock ...
      Oscar Schindler ...

      Underground Railroad...
      French Resistance...

  • Always knew there was something about the Woz I really admired...

  • by tom229 (1640685)
    Given this statement, it must just kill Woz to see what's happened to Apple.
  • Both of them can choose exactly how much privacy they want, because they're both rich. Gates is maybe three orders of magnitude richer than Woz, but both of them are at least three orders of magnitude away from the American median income ($45K or so).

    Also, neither of them can just go out in public in the US without being recognized.

    That's the problem with the privacy "discussions" in the US - most of the people who can actually change things are members of a minority who gave up big swaths of their privacy, voluntarily, as an entrance requirement for their profession. They can say "privacy is an illusion - get over it" with a straight face, because they haven't had any themselves for decades.

    They may be over it, but I'm not, and it pisses me off that they get to choose my privacy level.

  • by x_t0ken_407 (2716535) on Saturday March 15, 2014 @02:41PM (#46493803) Homepage

    "Rolling Stone retorts that privacy can be an issue: 'We want safety, but we also want privacy,' says the journalist. Bill Gates tells his main priority focuses on stopping the bad guys: 'Let's say you knew nothing was going on. How would you feel? I mean, seriously. I would be very worried. Technology arms the bad guys with orders of magnitude more [power]. Not just bad guys. Crazy guys."

    “Those who surrender freedom for security will not have, nor do they deserve, either one.”
    -Benjamin Franklin

    I wish I could just beat that into the head of the majority of people. We as a people should be firmly on the side of privacy over safety, it should not even be a question. Many do not see the big picture, but rather focused on a phantom enemy and see Snowden as betraying us against that enemy. Snowden is a true patriot, and indeed a hero, simply in the sense that he EXPOSED OUR PRIVACY BEING USURPED BY OUR OWN GOV'T. I'm pretty young (30 this year) but I'd imagine there was a time when the end of the last sentence would've incensed the MAJORITY of Americans, not just the one's paying attention. We must not sacrifice our freedom (in the form of privacy in this case) for safety. We cannot. And that is more important than some false sense of them doing this for our own good to "catch the bad guys". Secret courts, indefinite detention, etc. should NOT be happening in the land of the free. People wake the fuck up. /rant

    As for Gates, obviously he would not be a fan of Snowden...it's people like him who pull the strings of our gov't anyways. I wish I could say I was surprised.

  • No Surprises (Score:4, Interesting)

    by StormReaver (59959) on Saturday March 15, 2014 @02:42PM (#46493811)

    It doesn't surprise me that Bill Gates would identify with the megomaniacal dictatorship mentality that permeates our Federal Government. He was the megomanical dictator of a multinational corporation for so many years, that he can't understand an organization working in any other manner.

An Ada exception is when a routine gets in trouble and says 'Beam me up, Scotty'.

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