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United Kingdom Media

UK To Finally Legalize Ripping CDs and DVDs 92

Posted by Soulskill
from the only-20-years-too-late dept.
An anonymous reader writes with news that the U.K. government will finally legalize the copying of data from CDs, DVDs, and other types of media for personal use. This will allow U.K. citizens to legally make backups and digital copies of their media, which has been forbidden by copyright law previously. The changes will go into effect this June. It also grants permission for people to upload the ripped media to a remote host, though sharing of course remains illegal. "The mismatch between the law and public opinion became apparent through a Government-commissioned survey, which found that 85% of consumers already thought that DVD and CD ripping was legal. More than one-third of all consumers admitted that they’d already made copies of media they purchased. Besides the new private copying rights, the upcoming amendments will also broaden people’s fair use rights. For example, people no longer have to ask permission to quote from or parody the work of others, such as a news report or a book, as long as it’s “fair dealing” and the source is recognized."
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UK To Finally Legalize Ripping CDs and DVDs

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  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday March 29, 2014 @03:51PM (#46611037)

    queerically also divided by religious affiliation http://www.youtube.com/results... [youtube.com]

    thanks again mom(s)

  • Finally (Score:5, Funny)

    by Anonymous Coward on Saturday March 29, 2014 @03:52PM (#46611049)

    ... I can rip my music CDs and play them on my Diamond Rio MP3 player.

  • Grrr... (Score:5, Funny)

    by Anonymous Coward on Saturday March 29, 2014 @03:54PM (#46611057)

    But what about those of us who want to rip Betamax, Casettes, Grammerphone Records and VHS?

  • by _Shorty-dammit (555739) on Saturday March 29, 2014 @03:55PM (#46611077)

    But what about cassettes?

  • by leuk_he (194174) on Saturday March 29, 2014 @03:59PM (#46611099) Homepage Journal

    DVD are still mostly copy protected by the highly ineffective CCS copy protection. blue ray are more effectively protected, but the protection still is breakable by a lot of tools.

    by european law is decided:
    "the following anti-circumventing rules were implemented in European Directive 2001/29/EC of the European Parliament and of the council of May 22, 2001 on the harmonisation of certain aspects of copyright and related rights in the information society.

    This directive states in article 6, 'Obligations as to technological measures':

            Member States shall provide adequate legal protection against the circumvention of any effective technological measures, which the person concerned carries out in the knowledge, or with reasonable grounds to know, that he or she is pursuing that objective.
    "

    So you may copy it, but if you break ANY technlogical measure, you an still be sued by the content mafia fpr breaking copy protection technology. So think twice before you make a guide on your homepage how to copy a dvd.

    • by ledow (319597) on Saturday March 29, 2014 @04:07PM (#46611149) Homepage

      Sorry, but CSS isn't a copy protection technology of any kind. It's easily defeated within a matter of seconds on any modern PC. Legally, sure, but then if you're allowed to make an archive copy, that's your legal "right" and the industry would have to take you to court to decide which wins, and it will be expensive and (potentially) catastrophic for them to try it.

      What pisses me off ten times more is the "unreadable sectors" copy protection. It means that I've never watched a DVD on my laptop as all the ones I've tried have that shit and even with properly licensed DVD playing software and a DVD compliant drive, I can't watch it.

      So what do I do? I run it through one of the programs that just sucks the data off and ignore the errors, which leaves me with only "CSS" to defeat and half the time it's not worth the bother - leave it on, let the player worry about it and 99% of the time I only ever play from European region anyway so it doesn't hinder things to use something set in European region for CSS decryption.

      To be honest the things that piss me off go in the order:

      - Unreadable sectors
      - Blocked UOPS
      - Too much shit on the beginning of the movie (sometimes MINUTES before you can even get to the main menu).
      - The law about making a backup of a product I have in my hands for my own, personal, reasonable usage (so I don't wear my discs out and have easy access to the content).
      - CSS

    • by symbolset (646467) * on Saturday March 29, 2014 @05:43PM (#46611621) Journal
      If you can break it then it isn't effective and breaking it is therefore legal, eh?
    • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday March 30, 2014 @02:07AM (#46613381)

      Yep, as it says in the helpful consumer guide (http://www.scribd.com/doc/215022716)
      "Media such as DVDs are often protected by anti-copying technology to guard against copyright piracy, and this is protected by law. Copyright owners will still be able to apply this protection. However, if copy protection is too restrictive, you may raise a complaint with the Secretary of State."

    • DVD are still mostly copy protected by the highly ineffective CCS copy protection. blue ray are more effectively protected, but the protection still is breakable by a lot of tools.

      I believe that EU courts have declared CSS to not be "effective copy protection", so it is legally breakable.

      However, this new legislation does seem fairly worthless because the "consumer guide" that the government has released says that you still don't have the right to break DRM in order to exercise your new right to copy CDs/DVDs/ebooks/etc.

      To be honest, I'm surprised how widely the population has accepted ebooks, given how restrictive the licensing terms and DRM are. For example, if you buy a paper book, you can read it, then your wife can read it, you can lend it to a friend/relative to read, then it can sit on your book shelf for 20 years until your kids read it. All of this stuff has been considered "normal" usage for a book - people expect to be able to do this stuff and it seems reasonable to them. Now compare to an ebook - lets take a Google Play book as an example: you "buy" it and you can read it. Then when your wife wants to read it, she has to buy her own copy. You can't lend it to a friend - they have to buy their own too. In 20 years time, your kids will have to buy their own copies (although I have serious doubts that you will still be able to get at your purchased ebooks by that time anyway). There is no mechanism within Play to let you lend books to friends or family and the licence even prevents you from letting someone else read it on your own tablet. To me, all this seems completely unreasonable and I'm really surprised that everyone else doesn't think so to, given that all this stuff has been accepted practice for hundreds of years. Of course, you can choose to strip the DRM and/or break the licence terms, but to my mind what's the point in paying for the content in the first place if you're going to be forced into breaking the law anyway?

    • by TheRaven64 (641858) on Sunday March 30, 2014 @06:54AM (#46614009) Journal

      The new law actually takes this into account. If you buy something in a format with 'digital locks' that prevent format shifting, you may write to the Secretary of State for permission to break the locks. This will be granted, unless the same item is available in a format without digital locks. The upshot of this is that if you sell DRM-free media in the UK, then you can force people to buy a second copy to format shift (but only once), but if you don't then they can format shift whatever encumbered format they want.

      This means that breaking DRM is explicitly legal in the UK, unless the same media is available without DRM (in which case there's little reason to bother breaking the DRM - you could just buy it in a more friendly format). I'm really looking forward to the Secretary of State receiving thousands of letters a day from people asking to rip their DVDs. Don't forget: you can send one letter per DVD you own...

      • by Anonymous Coward on Monday March 31, 2014 @08:27AM (#46619967)

        This is ... not legal advice. There are several factual errors in this analysis.

        Firstly you don't write to the Secretary of State for "permission to break the locks". You write to him to complain about the locks, and then he has the power to require the lock owner give you a method to make a copy for personal use, which he is under no obligation whatsoever to exercise.

        Secondly it does not mean that breaking DRM is explicitly legal in the UK, not whatsoever. The circumvention requirements of ACTA still apply, and this is made abundantly clear in all the DoI literature on the subject, which you should read.

        The actual legislation is here. [legislation.gov.uk]

        I'm really looking forward to the Secretary of State receiving thousands of letters a day from people asking to rip their DVDs

        Yes, if everyone was this childish then the system would collapse and we'd go back to not having fair-use rights. I'm not sure what the benefit of this would be, exactly ...

  • by MCROnline (1027312) on Saturday March 29, 2014 @04:18PM (#46611207)
    May I be one of the first to say to my fellow UK citizens... Welcome to the 20th Century. Oh...wait..Oh well, better late than never.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday March 29, 2014 @04:19PM (#46611211)

    Nobody has ever been taken to court for making a personal copy of something they had already licensed for personal use.

    Throwing nutrient-free bones which in fact do little more than harmonise with American legislation to further integrate us into the United States - anyone would think it's election year. I was surprised to see New Labour managing to fuck things up more than Thatcher, but Cameron's done even worse.

  • Good luck (Score:5, Interesting)

    by TheRealMindChild (743925) on Saturday March 29, 2014 @04:21PM (#46611225) Homepage Journal
    "Audio outputs temporarily muted. Do not adjust the playback volume. The content being played is protected by Cinavia and is not authorized for playback on this device. For more information, see http://www.cinavia.com./ [www.cinavia.com] Message Code 3."
    • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday March 29, 2014 @05:20PM (#46611531)

      Everything that plays will be copied. Everything else will be returned for a full refund. Oh who am I kidding. I will not pay for music ever again. That industry needs to go away.

      • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday March 29, 2014 @08:09PM (#46612289)

        I totally agree. The fatcats behind the music labels have flooded the planet with sh1te. People need to put quality music before lining the pockets of corrupt businessmen. Same for politicians- chop their pay so we get quality people doing it to help others not self serving eton scum doing it for the undeserved huge salaries

    • Re:Good luck (Score:4, Insightful)

      by AmiMoJo (196126) * <mojo AT world3 DOT net> on Saturday March 29, 2014 @07:09PM (#46612069) Homepage

      PROTIP: Never buy the DRM version, get the torrent instead. Buying the crippled version just encourages them to keep doing it.

      • Re:Good luck (Score:5, Interesting)

        by TheRealMindChild (743925) on Saturday March 29, 2014 @08:09PM (#46612295) Homepage Journal
        The torrented version up to this point had 3 ways to go with this:
        1. - Rip from bluray and tell people trying to play it on a smart appliance that detects the cinavia watermark "lol ur stewpid. Get real hardware loser" or "OMG it plays on my laptop via VLC fine. Shut up n00b."
        2. - Maim the audio stream to an unintelligible mess to the point the water mark isn't detected, but deal with the fact that you can't even tell what you are hearing most of the time
        3. - Rip the audio stream from the DVD copy and match it up with the bluray video stream

        The last was the most popular until recently where they are putting cinavia in the audio tracks of the DVDs as well now.

    • Re:Good luck (Score:4, Informative)

      by thegarbz (1787294) on Saturday March 29, 2014 @07:44PM (#46612207)

      This relies on the player to look for Cinavia. Blu-ray players do. That's about it. Your rip doesn't work on the bluray player? Pop it on a USB drive and play it on the TV, or via a media centre over the network, or via a DVR.

      I run RaspBMC for my media centre. Do you think the XBMC community is all giddy at the opportunity to include such a user friendly feature like Cinavia?

      • Re:Good luck (Score:4, Interesting)

        by TheRealMindChild (743925) on Saturday March 29, 2014 @08:22PM (#46612357) Homepage Journal
        Most set to smart media players are shipping with Cinavia. Roku, Netgear NeoTV, now WDTV Live, to name a popular few implement Cinavia protection. Going forward it will eventually be all of them.

        I'm not even going to comment on your other "solutions".
        • by NapalmV (1934294) on Saturday March 29, 2014 @08:35PM (#46612415)
          Where did you get a WD TV Live with Cinavia? Is there a special version for UK that has it or what?
        • by thegarbz (1787294) on Sunday March 30, 2014 @09:09AM (#46614365)

          You say "most" I say you've named a few, and of those you've mentioned a google search shows some of them don't actually have Cinavia. Also my parent's WDTV Live plays Cinavia content without issue. Also every model of WDTV I've seen released on the local market is listed on Slysoft's site as not containing Cinavia, hence it also doesn't support BluRay menus. A quick google search shows most of Netgear NeoTVs don't implement it either despite talk of it in the market material.

          The only equipment mandated to required Cinavia is blueray players and even some of those don't implement it.

          As for using some condescending quotes when talking about my other solutions, stop being childish. Most Smart TVs these days will happily stream videos over the network, have USB ports and will happily play anything you throw at it. The only reason I have XBMC running at all is because my TV doesn't do library management. If however you were calling XBMC a "solution" in the same condescending way then feel free to keep doing what you're doing, movies must suck when you only get the first 20min of audio. Or just buy an Apple TV which is also Cinavia free, oh and Apple TV would qualify as "most" in this case given it's market share.

          None of this really matters though. As is always the case when DRM is forced on users they will bypass it. No one cared until it was mandated in bluray players last year. Now suddenly AnyDVD has defeated all software BluRay players from detecting it, DVDFab apparently has worked around copying discs (though no word on ripping yet), and as of November there's been plenty of chatter around forums to suggest the DRM scheme will fall sometime this year. Though right now you can buy just about any media centre on the market which isn't a BluRay player and isn't a Roku and be just fine.

          • by Xest (935314) on Monday March 31, 2014 @05:29AM (#46619273)

            I didn't even know Cinavia was a thing until I read this thread and I've been playing films on my PC, consoles and smart TVs regularly. I probably watch more films on a wider range of devices than most people yet I've never even seen or heard of this thing previously.

            That's how irrelevant it is.

            • by thegarbz (1787294) on Monday March 31, 2014 @07:39AM (#46619719)

              That's how irrelevant it *was*. The problem is that this is a copy protection which has existed in the shadows for years so it's been generally ignored even by manufacturers, until now.

              Basically it's copy protection enforced by the playing device. Now why would a manufacturer want to install something like that? Why would a media company use a disc protection mechanism that doesn't do anything on most players? Enter Sony and the PS3, which with one of it's critical updates introduced Cinavia. Then there came an explosion of Cinavia protected films. Still no one cared, but most Blurays that came out last year had Cinavia protection. So the only thing missing was Cinavia on playback devices.

              Well in 2012 the BluRay Disc Association made Cinavia mandatory for BDA certification of players. That now means that you can't get certification if your player doesn't support Cinavia.
              1) Effectively all those "smart" bluray players which want to double as a media player are now useless to many people as they can't play their legitimate rips of content they conveniently store on a server and now have to buy yet another bloody device. (RPi in my case).
              2) All computer software capable of playing blurays either need to support cinavia or need to break the encryption some how (AnyDVD).
              3) After market media players which don't support Cinavia, also don't support things like Bluray menus effectively meaning you can't play backed up content in it's full glory or without breaking the encryption first.

              So while you say it's irrelevant I ask why the hell can I not buy a computer and simply expect to pop a bluray in the drive and have it run without problems, and don't even get me started on Linux bluray support.

              DRM is anything but irrelevant in the movie industry, though it is almost completely irrelevant in the gaming / music industry.

              • by Xest (935314) on Monday March 31, 2014 @08:09AM (#46619847)

                Things like this never work though, we saw it with DVDs where companies were told they couldn't provide region free players if they wanted to be certified, well guess what? China didn't give a shit, and started churning out cheap unbranded players that were region free - no one gave a fuck that they weren't certified because, well, they all still worked like any other and had other features like being able to play DivX movies and so forth to boot.

                It wasn't long before the likes of Toshiba and Samsung said fuck this, we're not losing the market because the movie industry is lame and started to follow suit.

                The problem is when you start making it profitable to break such DRM methods then that DRM wont last long and the market will start to get flooded with devices that ignore that DRM rendering it useless. All the industry manages to do in the process is piss off legitimate consumers and lump manufacturers and themselves with returned products that don't work costing them a fortune.

                Long story short, there's no natural positive economic model in DRM, hence it's doomed to fail in the fact of competing economic interests that do have natural markets - i.e. consumers that just want to play their content.

                • by thegarbz (1787294) on Monday March 31, 2014 @07:03PM (#46626475)

                  Very true and there's already whispers around the internet that Cinavia was broken a few months ago. The trick is to introduce inaudible pitch changes in the audiotrack but the specifics are not known.

                  The point about the damages not being irrelevant are however still the same. You remember the retarded notion that Windows XP released in 2001 couldn't out of the box play a disc format released in 1995 despite the OS itself coming on that disc format? Or just look at how long it took for Linux to be able to play a DVD-Audio. Or just look at the state of Bluray support on Linux.

                  Just because encryption schemes are worthless and can be broken doesn' t mean we shouldn't fight them at every turn.

                  • by Xest (935314) on Tuesday April 01, 2014 @03:53AM (#46628569)

                    I absolutely agree for what it's worth, I'm concerned that DRM is given such a free pass here on Slashdot - Valve is positively worshipped here and barely a word wrong can be said about them, yet they're responsible for arguably the greatest proliferation of some of the most intrusive DRM on the PC to date. When they do hashes of DNS cache of suspected cheaters and so forth they're made excuses for and so on "Oh, it's only suspected cheaters" - so fucking what? A game isn't important enough to commit a flagrant invasion of privacy over.

                    So you're preaching to the converted here, I believe no company deserves a free ride of DRM whoever they are, and I believe no DRM is ever acceptable because it has no logical benefit for the consumer ever, under any circumstance, it's only ever detrimental and it uses our CPU cycles, bandwidth, and memory to cause that detriment to our experiences.

                    So apologies if I gave the impression I was suggesting we shouldn't fight it - I agree we absolutely should. I was more making the point that I suspect it's doomed to fail precisely because people will fight it, especially when there's an economic incentive in selling devices that don't screw the consumer with it.

        • by Anonymous Coward on Monday March 31, 2014 @02:58PM (#46624011)

          http://shop.seagate.com/store?Action=html&Locale=en_US&SiteID=sgateus&pbPage=SalesAndClearance

          GoFlex Tv $49.99 straight from Seagate. It has played everything I have asked it to play, including Bluray rips.

      • by adolf (21054) <flodadolf@gmail.com> on Sunday March 30, 2014 @09:00AM (#46614321) Journal

        For playback on the BFT, I've got a few options. I can use the PS3 (ideal -- the scaler is awesome), the Xbox 360 (meh), a modified Wii (has other issues), an old laptop with a barely-supported video card (similar issues to the Wii), or a Krell DVD-Standard (only issue is lack of HDMI/DVI output, and physical wear and tear on an $8,000.00 device).

        For Cinavia-tainted backups (which both the PS3 and 360 puke on), I've found that the best option (as in: the option with the least fuckery) for me is to use AVStoDVD [sourceforge.net] (free, OSS, zero bullshit, technical enough for tweak-mongers, always works, fairly fast, awesome output) to burn a proper DVD and play it on the Krell.

        Yeah, it's 480p. But it's a beautiful 480p, devoid of meaningful artifacts. Playback, once the media is on a DVD, is simple: Select appropriate inputs, insert DVD, adjust volume, do nothing else, and enjoy the film.

        I could do the same with any cheap bog-standard pre-Cinavia DVD player, but my bog-standrard DVD player just happens to be a ridiculously-expensive Krell.

        And so I guess this is my point: Cheap DVD players really are -cheap-, easily-replaced, and essentially universal. My backup will play nicely in anything from the Krell to a Chrysler minivan: I can lend it to others and as long as their player is not infected with Cinavia, they'll have zero issues playing it. And DVD+/-R media is cheap/fast enough that that it is both disposable and versatile (unlike thumbdrives, or Internet connectivity).

        It doesn't take a Raspberry Pi and fuckery to play this stuff: All it takes is $20 and a trip to the dollar store or pawn shop.

        (And data loss? Don't scratch the disc, and be sure to store it in the dark. Done. Really.)

  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday March 29, 2014 @04:28PM (#46611265)

    Slightly OT, but is there anyone from Austria or familiar with Austrian copyright law that could tell me whether it is legal to rip DVDs there?

    I may be moving over there for work and would be taking my NAS, which contains around 2,000 DVD and Blu Ray films that I have ripped for my home theater PC. Is it legal to take that NAS to Austria? Otherwise, I'll have to leave it in the states. And do without my collection -- I'm sure as hell not going to ship 30 big boxes of moves over there.

  • by Spottywot (1910658) on Saturday March 29, 2014 @04:32PM (#46611293)
    It's finally legal to do something that no-one could be bothered to harass me for doing when it was illegal. I feel freer already.
    • by mrbester (200927) on Saturday March 29, 2014 @05:55PM (#46611675) Homepage

      The 85% who thought it wasn't illegal to make a backup were correct as it isn't illegal to do so. However, it was a copyright infringement to do so. So you have something you are entitled to do that is also illegal. Since your consumer rights trump a civil misdemeanour (never tested, but your rights are inviolable) no one wanted the hassle of upholdng that law.

      • by Spottywot (1910658) on Saturday March 29, 2014 @06:44PM (#46611931)

        The 85% who thought it wasn't illegal to make a backup were correct as it isn't illegal to do so. However, it was a copyright infringement to do so. So you have something you are entitled to do that is also illegal. Since your consumer rights trump a civil misdemeanour (never tested, but your rights are inviolable) no one wanted the hassle of upholdng that law.

        So you agree with me then?

    • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday March 29, 2014 @06:22PM (#46611821)

      Yeah, torrenting is way easier anyway.

    • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday March 29, 2014 @08:29PM (#46612385)

      It's finally legal to do something that no-one could be bothered to harass me for doing when it was illegal. I feel freer already.

      Hold it up to your nearest street-light camera and smile!

      I love the UK. You always know what's going on there.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday March 29, 2014 @04:41PM (#46611351)
    worthwhile. So I name on the jar 0f of its core It's best to try proje3t somewhere Has run faster paper towels about half of the Goals. It's when
  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday March 29, 2014 @04:41PM (#46611353)

    I'm sure no one has been stopped at copying media for personal use for a long time, but there's also this part in the end of the summary:

    Besides the new private copying rights, the upcoming amendments will also broaden people’s fair use rights. For example, people no longer have to ask permission to quote from or parody the work of others, such as a news report or a book, as long as it’s “fair dealing” and the source is recognized.

    • by Spottywot (1910658) on Saturday March 29, 2014 @04:49PM (#46611391)

      I'm sure no one has been stopped at copying media for personal use for a long time, but there's also this part in the end of the summary:

      Besides the new private copying rights, the upcoming amendments will also broaden people’s fair use rights. For example, people no longer have to ask permission to quote from or parody the work of others, such as a news report or a book, as long as it’s “fair dealing” and the source is recognized.

      That actually is good news, haven't read the details yet, but on the face of it a really positive move. Must check to see what this is designed to distract us from...

      • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday March 29, 2014 @08:54PM (#46612509)

        I'm sure no one has been stopped at copying media for personal use for a long time, but there's also this part in the end of the summary:

        Besides the new private copying rights, the upcoming amendments will also broaden people’s fair use rights. For example, people no longer have to ask permission to quote from or parody the work of others, such as a news report or a book, as long as it’s “fair dealing” and the source is recognized.

        That actually is good news, haven't read the details yet, but on the face of it a really positive move. Must check to see what this is designed to distract us from...

        Hmmm as a guess a "Free Trade Agreement" with the USA which will remove all such rights as you "willingly" take on the US copyright and patent laws, much like the TPPA is going to do to loads of countries around the pacific.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday March 29, 2014 @05:21PM (#46611537)
    Open platform, Theo de Raadt, one Awesome During which I been many, not the one common goal - TO STICK SOMETHING [idge.net] centralized Shouts To the
  • by umafuckit (2980809) on Saturday March 29, 2014 @06:45PM (#46611935)
    However, it will remain illegal to circumvent DRM [techdirt.com]. So whilst this law is progress, it's not progressing very far.
  • by nurb432 (527695) on Saturday March 29, 2014 @06:51PM (#46611969) Homepage Journal

    And reality.. Common sense.. And many other things, not just 'public opinion'

  • by Highland Deck Box (2786087) on Saturday March 29, 2014 @08:06PM (#46612281)
    Oh boy I can't wait to rip all my... oh wait I haven't used the dvd drive on my computer in like five years. I don't actually think it's connected because I needed the power connector for another hard drive.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday March 30, 2014 @12:57AM (#46613237)

    I used to buy physical copies, but since they made it illegal to do whatever I want with them, I decided to not buy them any more.

  • by theendlessnow (516149) * on Sunday March 30, 2014 @01:04AM (#46613253)

    Anyone wanna bet that the USA will never allow their citizens to create backup copies of their DVDs? Land of Freedo.... never mind...

  • by Canberra1 (3475749) on Sunday March 30, 2014 @02:46AM (#46613469)
    In Australia, the AG's position is No - sucking up to Taliban copyright holders. With our mother country (England) going the other way - there is bound to be egg on their faces. They also keep the laws low profile, as the iPhone generation now vote, and spitting in the face of voters and downloaders will cost them seats. In the meantime netflix and usip are doing brisk business, as the exstisting price fixing agreements have not been prosecuted, so the advantage of rich media barons. May more undeclared party donations become 'uncovered'.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday March 30, 2014 @03:38AM (#46613613)

    does this mean a new version of dvd decrypter?

  • by carvell (764574) on Sunday March 30, 2014 @04:43AM (#46613739) Homepage

    As noted in this [ipo.gov.uk] report, Technological Protection Measures (TPMs) (i.e. CSS) are still protected:

    "Consistent with the approach taken in relation to other exceptions, no reference to TPMs is made within draft Section 28B. Effective TPMs which prevent copying of copyright materials will however continue to be protected, separately to copyright protection, under Section 296ZA CDPA, and circumvention of such measures will continue to be prohibited."

  • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday March 30, 2014 @06:58AM (#46614017)

    That is so awesome. Just in time for the tenth anniversary of the obsolescence of CDs and DVDs. W00t!

  • by fa2k (881632) <pmbjornstad@@@gmail...com> on Sunday March 30, 2014 @08:53AM (#46614297)

    CDs are the best way to get the best sound quality for a reasonable price. They are useless physical objects so i only keep the rips. Good that it's legal now ! (I'm no longer in the UK, but wasn't caught ;)

  • by AAWood (918613) <aawood&gmail,com> on Sunday March 30, 2014 @01:19PM (#46615557)

    I'm more interested in this part:

    People no longer have to ask permission to quote from or parody the work of others, such as a news report or a book, as long as it’s “fair dealing” and the source is recognized.

    As a Brit who does indeed already back up my media, yeah, it's cool that that's moving from "illegal but unenforceable and unenforced" to "legal", but finally getting proper Fair Use laws? That's major. With the increasing use of digital media as primary, disc ripping is on the decline anyway, while home-grown content creation and mixing is definitely on the rise. That will have a much larger effect on more people, now and moving forwards.

  • by derrek (1169041) on Sunday March 30, 2014 @04:57PM (#46616541)
    So will UK implement private copying levy on blank media like in other countries that allow private copy ? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/P... [wikipedia.org] I wonder how much they'll charge ?
  • by Zoxed (676559) on Monday March 31, 2014 @12:37PM (#46622565) Homepage

    Sorry if I sound too cynical but has anyone gone over this with a fine toothcomb ? Seems strange to be given new freedoms without something being taken away ?

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