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Ubuntu Cloud Data Storage Open Source

Canonical Shutting Down Ubuntu One File Services 161

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the at-least-we-get-code dept.
jones_supa (887896) writes "Wanting to focus their efforts on their most important strategic initiatives and ensuring that the company is not spread too thin, Canonical is shutting down Ubuntu One file services. With other services now regularly offering from 25 GB to 50 GB of free storage, the personal cloud storage space wasn't a sustainable place for Canonical. As of today, it will no longer be possible to purchase storage or music from the Ubuntu One store. The Ubuntu One software will not be included in the upcoming Ubuntu 14.04 LTS release, and the Ubuntu One apps in older versions of Ubuntu and in the Ubuntu, Google, and Apple stores will be updated appropriately.

The current services will be unavailable from 1 June 2014; user content will remain available for download until 31 July, at which time it will be deleted. For a spark of solace, the company promises to open source the backend code."
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Canonical Shutting Down Ubuntu One File Services

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  • It's a pity (Score:3, Interesting)

    by nicomede (1228020) on Wednesday April 02, 2014 @09:16AM (#46638835)

    I for one used this service to share files between my Ubuntu desktops, it worked seamlessly. It is especially useful for development files (programs and scripts) that I share between my different workplaces.

    If anyone has a replacement suggestion that integrates well with the Ubuntu desktop, I would be glad to hear from it.

  • Re:like always (Score:5, Interesting)

    by bill_mcgonigle (4333) * on Wednesday April 02, 2014 @09:25AM (#46638925) Homepage Journal

    they start so many project , and neither of them actually works great

    This would be my last complaint about Canonical. In any industry, 90+% of ideas are going to turn out to be unworkable. It's admirable that Canonical puts resources into trying so many in the first place. Perhaps they need to learn when to cut losses sooner, but trying is the mature approach.

    Now then, back to complaining about Canonical: they're releasing the code for the backend? Somebody tell me that the front end was just a webdav client and that the backend handled all the locking and synchronization parts so that this isn't a meaningless gesture for customers who are getting cut off with a whole two months' notice to re-design their workflows.

  • Re:like always (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Grishnakh (216268) on Wednesday April 02, 2014 @09:30AM (#46638971)

    It's not much different from Google. Google has long had a "throw shit at a wall and see what sticks" approach to business. But unlike Canonical, Google already had a cash cow in the form of its search service and the attached advertising services, and then later its Gmail service, so it could afford this kind of approach.

  • FTP? (Score:2, Interesting)

    by Viol8 (599362) on Wednesday April 02, 2014 @09:30AM (#46638975)

    Seriously , why do so many people thinking transfering files is some new problem still looking for a solution? I can understand it for Windows users but Linux users really should know better.

  • Re:like always (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Beuno (740018) <argentinaNO@SPAMgmail.com> on Wednesday April 02, 2014 @09:52AM (#46639195) Homepage

    Now then, back to complaining about Canonical: they're releasing the code for the backend? Somebody tell me that the front end was just a webdav client and that the backend handled all the locking and synchronization parts so that this isn't a meaningless gesture for customers who are getting cut off with a whole two months' notice to re-design their workflows.

    The client is not a simple webdav client, it's a pretty complex piece of code that has been open source since day one: http://bazaar.launchpad.net/~u... [launchpad.net]

    The server is a complex beast. It's the other side of the syncing protocol, it has a series of workers that do all sorts of tasks on uploaded files to present them back in a scalable, usable way, it handles music purchasing and delivering, performance metrics on the system, sharing between users, and a long etc :)

    I don't think users will care about open sourcing any of it, but others might be able to pick up where we left off.

  • by vladilinsky (1071536) on Wednesday April 02, 2014 @09:54AM (#46639227)
    I am always on the lookout for cloud storage my current list from best to worst with their respective pros and cons are (*Based on what I have seen & most of my computers run linux so its a major part of my list)

    1. Copy.com - Most free storage 15 gb, works with every environment, Integrates acceptably with linux, Most generous with new free space for referrals (+5 gb for both parties). I have not yet witnessed how it handles conflicting copies of a file. On that note If anyone wants a copy account we both get an extra 5 gigs if you follow my referral link https://copy.com?r=9frCDJ [copy.com]
    2. Dropbox - Great handling of conflicting copies, works with every environment, great linux integration, lowest storage space and lowest storage space per referral. Great handling of conflicted copies.
    3. Spideroak - Great linux integration, great encryption, No online viewing of files (due to the encryption) great linux integration 4. Box - great free space, none existent linux integration, no conflict checking/ history for free version. It ate many of my important school files because of this. 5. There are also Google drive and microsoft Onedrive but I have no experience with them.

    To sum up, right now My favorite is copy.com due to copious amounts for free space and Linux intigration. Hope that helps
  • by savuporo (658486) on Wednesday April 02, 2014 @11:44AM (#46640379)

    To actually rest at ease in regards to my stored data, i want a solution that does redundant distribution of my data across 2 or more storage solutions - with something super cheap and slow like Amazon Glacier in the mix , with more than one paid service, and a physical backup of my own hard disks hooked to a local NAS box as well.
    And i want an option for self-hosting the front-end too.

    So if something like Ubuntu pulls the plug, gets too expensive, fucks up their client, i dont have to worry about migrating my data or changing my workflows.

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