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The Internet United Kingdom

Oxford Internet Institute Creates Internet "Tube" Map 56

Posted by samzenpus
from the follow-the-lines dept.
First time accepted submitter Jahta (1141213) writes "The Oxford Internet Institute has created a schematic of the world's international fiber-optic links in the style of the famous London Tube map. The schematic also highlights nodes where censorship and surveillance are known to be in operation. The map uses data sourced from cablemap.info. Each node has been assigned to a country, and all nodes located in the same country have been collapsed into a single node. The resulting network has been then abstracted."
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Oxford Internet Institute Creates Internet "Tube" Map

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  • Submarine cable map (Score:5, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Friday April 04, 2014 @02:24AM (#46658681)

    That's missing a few cables -- the Submarine Cable Map [submarinecablemap.com] has more
    (and with the proper names as well)

    • by ModelX (182441) on Friday April 04, 2014 @03:16AM (#46658873)

      It's also imagining direct connections in south-east Asia that actually route via Hong Kong and Singapore. Haven't they run traceroute? This tube map seems to be an artistic project compared to the submarine cable map.

    • by AdamHaun (43173)

      That map is so much better and more informative than the tube map that I don't know why the latter exists at all. I know it's supposed to be a simplification, but if you condense that many cables into one route you end up with a map of countries that border the sea, not network routes. For example, there's nothing on the tube map to indicate that the UK is only one or two hops from Japan, or that the Seychelles are at the end of a line, even though it's clearly visible in both your map and the tube map's qu [cablemap.info]

  • Mandatory (Score:1, Funny)

    by Anonymous Coward

    We already knew the Internet is a series of tubes.

  • by NoKaOi (1415755) on Friday April 04, 2014 @02:51AM (#46658777)

    The US has the "surveillance" symbol and the "imprisonment" symbol. Shouldn't that equate to censorship? "We're gonna watch everything you do, and we're gonna imprison you if we don't like what you're doing by calling it 'terrorism' or a 'national security threat,' but no, we're not censoring you, you can say whatever you want!"

  • It's a series of tubes!
  • "censorship" (Score:2, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward

    Don't see a little "censorship" logo on GBR, despite IWF, court orders requiring denial of access to whole file sharing web sites (not just infringing files), a torrent of laws restricting the sort of speech permitted on the Internet (and anywhere else), etc.

    And GBR is the only European country with known Internet surveillance - orly?

    This map really isn't very good.

  • The map is Biased (Score:5, Interesting)

    by phayes (202222) on Friday April 04, 2014 @03:45AM (#46658959) Homepage

    The data used to create it is from Reporteurs sans Frontières. France's DGSE performs the same mass surveillance of the internet & telephone data as the US & UK but nobody talks about it because:
    A: It's legal here for the government to snoop on anyone they want. Foreign nationals, French citizens, whatever...
    B: The government has a level of control over the press not present in the US/UK and discourages reporters here from talking about it.

    RSF knows that this is the case but somehow France is conveniently left off the list of surveillance states? Suuurrree...

    On a side note:
    I have moved much of my home browsing over to a tablet. Beta is now being foist upon me even when logged in and the /?nobeta=1 URL trick no longer functions. Way to go slashdot, I've been a regular for close to 2 decades but now only visit when sitting down in front of a PC/Mac. Still losing readership? I'm an example.

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by geekmux (1040042)

      The data used to create it is from Reporteurs sans Frontières. France's DGSE performs the same mass surveillance of the internet & telephone data as the US & UK but nobody talks about it because: A: It's legal here for the government to snoop on anyone they want. Foreign nationals, French citizens, whatever... B: The government has a level of control over the press not present in the US/UK and discourages reporters here from talking about it.

      RSF knows that this is the case but somehow France is conveniently left off the list of surveillance states? Suuurrree...

      On a side note: I have moved much of my home browsing over to a tablet. Beta is now being foist upon me even when logged in and the /?nobeta=1 URL trick no longer functions. Way to go slashdot, I've been a regular for close to 2 decades but now only visit when sitting down in front of a PC/Mac. Still losing readership? I'm an example.

      Uh, while I appreciate your insight and information here as to why the map is biased, the bias is far more obvious than that.

      Just ask anyone who doesn't live near underground public transportation (the other 95% of the planet) staring at this kitschy London Tube theme, wondering how the hell we've devolved from a world map overnight.

      A mechanic may work under a hood all day long, but you certainly don't see them explaining geography using a timing belt, radiator, and three engine mounts.

      • by Anonymous Coward

        Whatever point you're making is pretty much lost amongst the sarcasm. You start off talking about bias, then you seem to be claiming that topological graph representations only make sense if you use similar maps every day, then you make some completely non-sequiteur comment about mechanics that I guess is supposed to be a metaphor, but for what?

        • by geekmux (1040042)

          Whatever point you're making is pretty much lost amongst the sarcasm. You start off talking about bias, then you seem to be claiming that topological graph representations only make sense if you use similar maps every day, then you make some completely non-sequiteur comment about mechanics that I guess is supposed to be a metaphor, but for what?

          The mechanic was meant to be a methphor for those ignorant enough to not pull their head out of the Tube and realize a global representation should not be overlayed onto a subterranean map representing a few square miles that 5% of the world remotely understands or recognizes.

          As I said, the mechanic does not go home and teach their kids geography from under the hood of a car. The end result is what we have here, kitchy art.

          • by phayes (202222)

            Had the map been labeled in chinese or spanish or some other language on a non-english website, you might actually have a comprehensible point. Given that it is labeled in english where the tube map is a recognizable cultural reference point for a significant part of of the population, all that comes across is your distaste of london or the london tube map.

            I've never lived in England yet even growing up in the US I recognized the tube map style as distinctive. Your metaphors may be clear to you, but not to

            • by geekmux (1040042)

              Had the map been labeled in chinese or spanish or some other language on a non-english website, you might actually have a comprehensible point. Given that it is labeled in english where the tube map is a recognizable cultural reference point for a significant part of of the population, all that comes across is your distaste of london or the london tube map.

              I've never lived in England yet even growing up in the US I recognized the tube map style as distinctive. Your metaphors may be clear to you, but not to others so labeling them as ignorant when it is you that is being obscure is just ego stroking.

              The world is flat, and the other 95% of the planet who can access that data have little use for it because of it's abnormal representation. It's distinctive alright, as distinctive of any other artwork that I'm not expecting much function out of other than to hang there on the wall. Maps are designed to have purpose and generally like math are meant to be understood as a universal design. You know, kind of how we all settled on what the continents look like on world maps.

              Perhaps we should ask Disney to p

              • OTOH it made instant sense to me. It looks exactly like the Metro map in DC, which I guess they copied from London. Been awhile since I rode the tube.
              • by phayes (202222)

                This map had purpose: to try and shame the countries with a free press that perform mass surveillance, but in particular the US & UK.
                The map had a form similar to that of the London tube & DC subway.

                That the data used to create the map is based on incomplete and false data is more important to most than that you think the form is inaccurate.

                • by geekmux (1040042)

                  This map had purpose: to try and shame the countries with a free press that perform mass surveillance, but in particular the US & UK. The map had a form similar to that of the London tube & DC subway.

                  That the data used to create the map is based on incomplete and false data is more important to most than that you think the form is inaccurate.

                  Yes, I do agree with you on that point, but it's not really that important to me. I don't stress over exercises in futility, and attempting to even remotely guess at the intelligence-gathering capabilities of the world's most powerful governments is exactly that, regardless of leaks.

                  You would have better luck trying to estimate the hundreds of trillions of corporate dollars hidden in tax havens.

                  The map format was yet another exercise in futility for those attempting to find a purpose with this by creating

  • as a example why is turkey not on the censor list ... seems that the people that made the map never tried to watch porn in turkey

  • by Bender Unit 22 (216955) on Friday April 04, 2014 @04:44AM (#46659193) Journal

    Many european countries practice both censorship and surveillance.

    • by 91degrees (207121)
      I presume censorship means direct government censorship at the connection, rather than punishment after the fact (For example in the UK, not all ISPs are filtered, even by cleanfeed; in much of Europe promoting fascism is illegal but not blocked). Surveillance - while I would not be surprised if all countries were spying on the traffic - has only been proven to a reasonable standard in a few countries. I think they're using information from Reporters Without Borders.
  • by Teun (17872) on Friday April 04, 2014 @04:57AM (#46659247) Homepage
    I saw a comment on the importance of the Hongkong and Singapore exchanges for Asian communications, in a similar vein the AMS-IX is totally missing, one of the world's largest Internet exchanges and peering points.

    But it's still an interesting map on a very interesting website!

  • by towermac (752159) on Friday April 04, 2014 @05:43AM (#46659399)

    You can't go to jail in the US just for illegal use of the internet. You can for looking at kiddie porn, or threatening somebody, but those things were illegal before we had an internet. You can freely read about Marxism, Nazism, Al-Qaeda musings... with no fear. If they caught you being part of Al-Qaeda through the internet, they would have caught you before, through the telephone, post, or surveillance. Ed Snowden has shown us that lately the NSA goes too far in surveillance, but that's not the same thing (yet), as a Cuba and the like.

    Nobody is in jail here for reading or posting political views.

    The imprisonment badge on the US is BS, and was the whole purpose of making this political statement of a silly map.

    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      by orzetto (545509)

      You can't go to jail in the US just for illegal use of the internet.

      Yes you can, google up Justin River Carter. He made a hyperbolic, sarcastic comment on Facebook, and he's looking at up to 10 years in jail [washingtonpost.com]. Another case is Cameron D'Ambrosio's [ibtimes.com]. The magic word is terrorism: if anyone is scared by what you say or says they are, you are fornicated.

      You can for looking at kiddie porn, or threatening somebody, but those things were illegal before we had an internet.

      Same you can say about any country with the im

      • by towermac (752159)

        Yes, I read about Carter. It appears to be a gross overreaction by the Texas authorities. Although technically, he did threaten to shoot kindergartners and other violence. He's had a restraining order against him before.

        A Canadian reported him. He was not caught by surveillance. Your example is bogus.

      • So do we award Canada a surveilence icon because one of it's nanny-state supporting residence narced out Justin Carter to a whackaloon county prosecuter in Texas?

    • Re: (Score:1, Interesting)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Nobody is in jail here for reading or posting political views.

      Yup, no political prisoners in the US at all [afgj.org].

      • by Anonymous Coward

        Almost all of those are due to various crimes such as murder. If they are truly innocent then this is more of a matter of government corruption than political prisoners. They are not jailed for their political views. They might be jailed because they were framed by some over zealous prosecutors trying to make a name for themselves. I think this is quite a bit different than governments that make it clear that dissension is not allowed. The map is BS,

  • Good Old Ted Stevens [wikipedia.org] was proven right once and for all! It is a bunch of tubes!!!

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