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Master of Analytics Program Admission Rates Falling To Single Digits 74

Posted by samzenpus
from the no-room dept.
dcblogs (1096431) writes "The 75 students in the 2014 Master of Science in Analytics class at North Carolina State University received, in total, 246 job offers from 55 employers, valued at $22.5 million in salaries and bonuses, which is 24% higher than last year's combined offers. But the problem ahead is admissions. There may not be enough master's programs in analytics to meet demand. NC State has received nearly 800 applications for 85 seats. Its acceptance rate is now at 12.5%. Northwestern University's Master of Science in Analytics received 600 applications for 30 openings its September class. That's an acceptance rate of 6%"
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Master of Analytics Program Admission Rates Falling To Single Digits

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  • QQ More (Score:4, Interesting)

    by OverlordQ (264228) on Friday April 25, 2014 @07:07AM (#46839545) Journal

    NC State has received nearly 800 applications for 85 seats. Its acceptance rate is now at 12.5%. Northwestern University's Master of Science in Analytics received 600 applications for 30 openings its September class. That's an acceptance rate of 6%

    Try Med School. You might have 100 or more applicants per seat.

  • by nimbius (983462) on Friday April 25, 2014 @07:46AM (#46839681) Homepage
    There are a number of reasons why analytics is kinda a hard nut to crack. For poeple who genuinely enjoy physics and math as a discipline its frustrating to find yourself pidgeonholed in a single process as most analytics firms are outsource sweatshops for larger players like Boeing. Many firms just do one thing, like structure or fluid thermodynamics, and sometimes only on a single part or mind-numbingly enough a single subcomponent. Finding yourself staring at a combustor model or a bottle thread for 5 years is depressing and these firms will generally understand that. Expect to get short changed on licenses for software you use and your workstation wont come with super helpful things like a spaceball (navigation tool for 3d simulations)

    the other problem with these outsource firms is theyre practically the only way to get a job at a larger firm, so youre going to have to do time in the trenches and hope some customer thinks highly enough of your understanding of their processes to steal you from the firm youre in. Until then expect a rather meager paycheck to be spent on your college debt. Your "laureate" or upper level engineers in some of these firms literally only work there for 30 years because theyre borderline incompetent and can simply go through the motions of bullying the IT department to help them launch simulation software. They know the customers products and terminology inside and out, but are too incapable as engineers to make it beyond approving your timesheets.
  • by fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) on Friday April 25, 2014 @07:59AM (#46839735) Journal

    To coninue. So if it is statistical analysis, why not hire statisticians ? I feel like Data Analytics is another made up science degree , similar to "cyber security", in which student that have no background in CS, write papers on cyber attacks.

    Based on the purposes it seems to end up being put to, "Data Analytics" is the synonym for "I completed reasonably advanced studies in statistics and/or computer science and then I went into advertising" that you can say without feeling the strong urge to end your miserable life.

The opposite of a correct statement is a false statement. But the opposite of a profound truth may well be another profound truth. -- Niels Bohr

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