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Education IT

MIT To Offer Internet of Things Training For Professionals (computerworld.com) 63

dcblogs writes: MIT is offering an online course about the Internet of Things, and this is what you need to know up front: It's going to require, perhaps, six to eight hours of study time a week, which includes watching videos of lectures, engaging with faculty and fellow students in forums and taking tests. It begins April 12 and continues through May 24. It costs $495, and unlike some online courses, there is no free option. Students who complete the program and pass the tests earn a certificate of completion and 1.2 Continuing Education Units (CEUs) in MIT's professional education program. In exchange for their time and money, students will get an introduction, a roadmap, into the IoT and hear from some of the university's top professors, including Tim Berners-Lee, the founder of the World Wide Web. This professional program is a relatively new effort for the university.
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MIT To Offer Internet of Things Training For Professionals

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  • Things with internet. Exam on Tuesday.
    • by ls671 ( 1122017 )

      MIT professionals need a course on Internet of things? One might expect that they already know about it if they are MIT professionals ;-)

  • "A Continuing Education Unit is a measure used in continuing education programs, particularly those required in a licensed profession. A CEU is not an academic credit; however, it is a nationally recognized method of quantifying the time spent in the classroom during professional development and training activities."

    So in other words: "A Continuing Education Unit is ... worthless as shit for a software engineer or electrical engineer, since neither of these are licensed professions".

    Good to know. Thanks fo

    • by rtb61 ( 674572 )

      It is learning for fun done be professionals. That is not a bad thing, that is in fact a great thing and far better than the stupidity of going to a strip club, or some lame island tourist trap or a sex cruise. All idiot narcissist marketing aside, something which main stream media thrives on, selling stupid to idiots to waste their money, this is a real and profound change or more accurately a reversion to more logical values espoused early in the last century prior to the advent of lead in fuels (screw yo

    • Worthless, and you're paying $15 an hour to watch videos of lectures ...
    • My wife is a doctor and gets a $10k stipend each year for continuing education. The "IoT" is coming to medicine. It might be worth it to have some Doctors in the loop with that conversation.

      It's apparent they didn't when designing electronic medical records.

    • All other things being equal, I'd give raises and promotions to the people who demonstrate that they have a continuing interest in learning more and keeping abreast about subjects relevant to their field than someone who thinks that once they get their degree, they never have to learn anything else. So if you think that "quantifying the time spent in the classroom during professional development and training activities" = "worthless as shit", then hey, it's your résumé, good luck with that.

      (Of co

  • And how is this 'Internet of Things' supposed to function given the current lack of Internet security, yet more marketing waffle similar to the 'cloud'. Besides, does anyone remember that coke machine that was once connected to the Internet ref [cmu.edu].
  • by JustAnotherOldGuy ( 4145623 ) on Thursday January 21, 2016 @10:18PM (#51348155)

    They should name the course, "Internet Of Cheaply Made Shit With Built-In Exploits".

    Hackers everywhere are wetting their pants in expectation of this enormous, unbounded gift of a billion new things to hijack, spoof, and abuse. Because we all know that "security" will be an afterthought, if it's thought of at all.

    "I'll be in late today, boss, my refrigerator got hacked again and they made it order 10,000 gallons of soy milk off of Amazon. Oh, and while they were at it they took over my TV and it won't stop showing kiddie porn. And for some reason all of my internet-enabled toilets just keep flushing and flushing and flushing, I can't get 'em to stop...hey, why is my car blowing its horn over and over?"

    • by dbIII ( 701233 )
      That's probably a good reason for such courses. At least warn them of the utter newbie mistakes that a competent software developer and starting sysadmin knows not to make.
      I keep on bumping into "developers" that keep on making swarms of WiFi things all on the same IPv4 subnet as everyone else and all trying to talk to the same access point instead of having a mesh - and they keep assuming they can have thousands of the things so long as they have routing hacks. They want to know how to deal with fifteen
      • That's probably a good reason for such courses. At least warn them of the utter newbie mistakes that a competent software developer and starting sysadmin knows not to make.

        I'd hope this would have some beneficial effects, but will the manufacturers (specifically, managers and bean counters) spend the money to implement secure networking and access controls? My guess is probably not, unless they get a lot of pressure from end users or security professionals.

        They probably won't hire or listen to security professionals, and they won't hear from the end users until after they get hacked...so all in all, I'm not optimistic. It's just so much easier and cheaper to build something q

        • by dbIII ( 701233 )

          but I think we're in for 10 or 20 years of Exploit du Jour headlines.

          Ten year in embedded space maybe but we've already had that and more in desktop space - it's a malware swamp. Cryptolocker should be science fiction but utter stupidity on the security front made it possible just by people clicking on an email at which point MS Outlook and IE work together to carry out the will of the malware distributors.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      ...hey, why is my car blowing its horn over and over?"

      I was once on a locomotive doing that. It blew the horn when approaching a crossing and then the valve jammed and didn't shut. Blowing the horn a few times to make it open and close fixed the problem. Even though the problem didn't repeat that day, the repair shop shop looked at it, but could not find the problem. If they did anything, it might have been lubing the moving parts (not sure about that), but the problem never repeated.

      In addition to security issues, problems like this is actually my main concer

    • They have a cyber security course going on now which you may be interested in. https://mitprofessionalx.mit.e... [mit.edu]
  • by Irate Engineer ( 2814313 ) on Friday January 22, 2016 @12:04AM (#51348487)
    And they get a nice certificate "Introductory Diploma, Internet Of Things" that the can hang on their wall.
    • Before you can sell anything, you need to know who your potential customers are, right?

      Suggest to your marketing department that they start a project called Identify Demographic - Internet Of Things. Team identity is important. Budget for T-shirts & hats.

    • Slightly off-topic but...

      Some years ago (when cloud was still to become a commonplace term) some of my colleagues were setting up a marketing initiative on the grounds of identifying opportunities, planning and doing initial analyses.

      The internal name for this activity was Cloud Opportunity Workshop.

      I was asked to create a rapid prototype** tool for tracking various actions before, during and after the go-to-market engagements. For want of a better name [OK due to my mischievous nature] I called it the Pla

      • For want of a better name [OK due to my mischievous nature] I called it the Planning Analysis Tool.

        If yours is an international company, fitting the acronym to a derogatory word in one of the languages of one of your foreign offices can help slip this through radar. These are usually pronounceable words which is often the goal of acronyms. It livens up company meetings considerably.

    • Don't be so negative - just think of all the money you are likely to make from fixing problems with these thingies going wrong.

      • Don't be so negative - just think of all the money you are likely to make from fixing problems with these thingies going wrong.

        *Reaches over to unplug power cord from router*

        "Fixed! My consulting bill will be arriving in the mail soon, payable within 30 days. You're welcome!"

        *Jumps into limo for next consulting appointment*

  • What's the over/under on how long after May 24 the classes appear on a torrent site?

  • by wonkey_monkey ( 2592601 ) on Friday January 22, 2016 @08:21AM (#51349429) Homepage

    Tim Berners-Lee

    who I recently heard likes to refer to himself as "web developer."

  • Have they managed to fix the hacking phishing pestilence that's infesting the current Internet?
  • When does the "synergy for end-to-end enterprise web 2.0 solutions" course start?
  • Now, I would put down good money to become an expert on Internet of Things 2.0. But old fashioned Internet of Things? Get real!

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