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Education News

Brown CS Department Hiring Student Diversity, Inclusion Advocates 178

theodp writes: Brown University's Department of Computer Science is seeking to hire student advocates for diversity and inclusion as part of its new action plan to increase diversity. The new hires, who will also serve as members of the CS Diversity Committee, will support students, plan inclusion activities, and educate TAs on issues of diversity. Also on the diversity front, Brown touted last weekend's Hack@Brown, the school's annual student hackathon, as being "unlike any other hackathon" -- welcoming, inclusive, and inviting to students of all experience levels." A cynic might point out that Hack@Brown's tech giant sponsors boast track records that are quite the opposite. By the way, Brown@Hackathon certainly upped the ante on conference Codes of Conduct, warning that those anonymously-charged with making others feel uncomfortable on the basis of "gender, age, sexual orientation, disability, physical appearance, body size, race, or religion (or lack thereof)" will be "expelled from the event without travel reimbursement at the discretion of the event organizers." Brown explained that travel reimbursements were provided to promote "economic diversity", ensuring that students who couldn't otherwise afford to get to and from Providence could attend the Ivy League event. Hey, what "economically diverse" kid wouldn't want to go to a conference where rubbing someone the wrong way could leave them stranded in Rhode Island!
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Brown CS Department Hiring Student Diversity, Inclusion Advocates

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  • Trusting Nonny (Score:5, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Saturday February 13, 2016 @04:43PM (#51501887)

    >warning that those anonymously-charged with making others feel uncomfortable on the basis of "gender, age, sexual orientation, disability, physical appearance, body size, race, or religion (or lack thereof)" will be "expelled from the event without travel reimbursement at the discretion of the event organizers."

    Waitwaitwait. You mean if some Anonymous decides to make up some bullshit they can get anyone expelled without questions?
    I imagine that only apply to people that aren't "diverse" enough or "equal" enough, or that would quickly become a problem.

    • by fred911 ( 83970 )

      expelled without questions?

      Except for surfers who are granted "No Fat Chicks" sticker waivers (they're a protected class in RI).

    • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

      by AmiMoJo ( 196126 )

      "You mean if some Anonymous decides to make up some bullshit they can get anyone expelled without questions?"

      How on earth did you come to that conclusion? Why wouldn't there be some kind of investigation, assuming there was sufficient evidence presented in the first place?

      What you suggest is insane, what gave you the idea it was the case? It's not in TFA.

      • The key phrase is "anonymously-charged".

        Anonymously - the accused doesn't get to face and question the accuser.

        Charged. Which isn't the same as proved.

  • Summary is a troll (Score:2, Informative)

    by AmiMoJo ( 196126 )

    I can report fraud to the police anonymously in my country. Doesn't mean the accused will be investigated though. I'd have to provide some evidence, more than just accusations.

    But hay, don't let that spoil the rage-fest.

    • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

      by theodp ( 442580 )

      911: Ok what's the problem? Can you tell me exactly what happened?
      CALLER: This hacker...
      911: Yes.
      CALLER: Was reading yo-Mama-so-fat jokes.
      911: Do you have any evidence of that?
      CALLER: Absolutely, you can check his browser history to find the link to what he read.
      911: Alright police are on their way, you can meet them when they get there. What's your last name?
      CALLER: I'd prefer to remain anonymous.

      • by theodp ( 442580 )

        I kid, but why not just leave it at, "Don't be a jerk or you may be asked to leave the Conference with a refund." Isn't that kind of the unwritten Code of Conduct of everywhere? :-)

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by AmiMoJo ( 196126 )

        So your argument is an appeal to absurdity. You concoct a ridiculous example that clearly would never happen in real life, unrelated to TFA (an web form) and cite it as evidence to support your position.

        TFA mentions that they will probably just ask you to stop if you do something antisocial. It doesn't say, but I think it reasonable to assume they would use judgement and discretion, considering the care with which the CoC was written.

        If you like I'll make a joke about your mother, and we can put your claim

  • by Improv ( 2467 ) <pgunn01@gmail.com> on Saturday February 13, 2016 @04:44PM (#51501903) Homepage Journal

    Pity to see good intentions paired with such an unbalanced plan to enact those intentions.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday February 13, 2016 @04:47PM (#51501923)

    Dear Mr. whiplash:

    These diversity stories:
    -have little, if anything, to do with technology (The sociology of the software industry is not itself technology.)
    -attract outsiders from both sides with an agenda to push
    -inspire a lot of vitriolic posts from both sides
    -persuades no one and generates ill will from both extremes and the people who have a more centrist position

    Can we simply not have these anymore? It may be good for attracting page impressions but it results such bad feeling among posters that it doesn't make business sense to allow them when you're trying to revive /.s fortunes.

    • by whipslash ( 4433507 ) Works for Slashdot on Saturday February 13, 2016 @05:04PM (#51502011) Homepage Journal
      It's "whipslash". Slash, like Slashdot. Get it? Just playing. Your concern will be taken into account.
      • Not all of us are narrowminded basement dwellers... Some of us are actually interested in things beyond neckbeard technology articles. (Which isn't what made Slashdot great in the first place.)

        • by swb ( 14022 )

          Not all of us are narrowminded basement dwellers... Some of us are actually interested in things beyond neckbeard technology articles. (Which isn't what made Slashdot great in the first place.)

          Then find them elsewhere. There's whole Internet out there with all the inclusiveness debate and articles a person interested in them could want, and then some.

          This is a technology oriented site, there's only more technology out there and diluting the content to make it some kind of catch-all site for things doesn't

          • This is a technology oriented site, there's only more technology out there and diluting the content to make it some kind of catch-all site for things doesn't make this site better, it makes it worse.

            In a universe where posting a story "dilutes" anything, your comment would make sense. But we don't live in such a universe.

            What made Slashdot great wasn't stories about hot button social issues, but stories about technology.

            What made Slashdot great was it carried a large variety of stories related to t

      • While you're taking the concerns into account bear in mind tht plenty of us see that things like this as relavent. It's about rules at a major hackathon---how is that not news for nerds. And if there are things we're doing to make tech a boys only club, we'd rather hear about them than pretend everything is fine because we can't bear to have our precious feelings hurt.

        • For the record, I think this news is fine.
          • by KGIII ( 973947 )

            If I may opine, I'm inclined to agree. Add to that the fact that they get plenty of conversation. If nothing else, it keeps us amused or busy for a while.

            That said, I am inclined to agree but I'd worry about posting these types of articles too frequently. So far, since the change of ownership, I've no complaints. Things are chugging along and we're as (dys)functional as always. Assuming they're not too frequent then I doubt it will drive away users.

            In other words, you're doing fine. My journal has a bunch o

            • Thanks for the support. The comment limit for excellent karma needs to be changed/eliminated. I'll take a look.
    • by epyT-R ( 613989 )

      You do realize that your list is likely the very reason these sorts of people push this crap? One other thought: Taking the mean between two opposing sides is not automatically the truth or the correct solution.

      • Taking the mean between two opposing sides is not automatically the truth or the correct solution.

        Of course it is.

        Oh, sorry, I thought I was at Wikipedia.

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by AmiMoJo ( 196126 )

      Dear Mr. AC, some of us like these stories. As far as I'm aware it's not mandatory to read them, so if they bother you please feel free to skip to the next one.

    • It may be good for attracting page impressions but it results such bad feeling among posters that it doesn't make business sense to allow them when you're trying to revive /.s fortunes.

      If the geek can't accept an open and frank discussion of gender issues in tech, then Slashdot has no future.

      What is it to be here, a white male fraternity of insecure adolescents who circle the wagons whenever a breath of fresh air threatens the status quo?

      • If the geek can't accept an open and frank discussion of gender issues in tech, then Slashdot has no future.

        Don't be ridiculous, a desire for and acceptance of an open and frank discussion of gender issues in tech is a manifestation of the privilege that while males have.

        For the sake of marginalized groups, we must instead have carefully controlled discussions of gender issues where the permitted arguments and conclusions are all determined in advance to avoid making anyone feel unwelcome.

      • by Ol Olsoc ( 1175323 ) on Saturday February 13, 2016 @10:00PM (#51503675)

        If the geek can't accept an open and frank discussion of gender issues in tech, then Slashdot has no future.

        An open and frank discussion is very very welcome.

        Where do we get one?

        Because the framework of teh discussion, the one we are presented with, is me in IT are sexist pigs.

        It's the equivalent of going up to someonje and calling them a vile name, and then when they get angry, saying "See? See? All the proof you need that I am right!"

        There is no frank and open discussion because the problem is already "solved" no other possibility is allowed.

        So here is the problem as I have read it.

        Young girls have the eexact same passion for STEM careers as young boys.

        But society forces young girls into other careers by abusing them with things like Barbie dolls, Dongle jokes, fat shaming, and using a playmate model's face as a subject for image processing. Now re-read that and see if it makes any sense to you. If it wasn't given as exact examples of why women don't go into STEM.

        And the men are terrible sexist, harassing pigs.

        Okay - there is the framework Those are what chase women who have a passion for STEM away from it. And it is the fault of males 100 percent.

        Now if we were having an open and frank discussion, I would be allowed to ask questions.

        Here they are.

        Does none of these issues exist outside of STEM?

        Many young women go into business. If those issues I stated keep women out of STEM - how does the fact that many business employ escorts, women whose job it is to entertain out of town guests. And when I mean entertain, I mean go to dinner, have a nice evening and then hop between the sheets, for some in-depth entertainment.

        Having worked in IT, I know of no women who are employed to have sex with men. I know if I was female, I'd go apeshit crazy over that. I know my wife who worked in the business world, encountered some very personal and very intensively real sexual harassment. Oddly enough, instead of running away, she ended up destroying the guy in question.

        Next question is - have these career choices that women are not chased away from not ever have any situation in which the woman or young lady was made uncomfortable? That would be a pretty charmed existence indeed. If the worst thing I ever had to listen to was two women telling dongle jokes, well first I'd laughh - I cannot imagine I would ever try to get them fired.

        Now I would like to ask a positive question - Why now are fields such as veterinarian rapidly becoming the sole province of women? Is there something that can be learned from the overwhelming success the field has had in attracting women that can be learned?

        Next in this discussion, I wouldn't even be considered competent to address these issues, but I have a long history of working to recruit young ladies into STEM careers. We did a lot of recruiting, and a lot of work with young ladies to try to get them interested. The results? almost zero. Most young ladies wanted to be lawyers, next up was vets. More girls wanted to be pop singers than STEM workers.

        In addition We were doing as much as we could to hire and retain women. We even fast tracked them for promotions. I gave up several promotions for that purpose.

        And experience wise, when I started there in the mid-70's, there were more women working in the STEM positions. Some retired, some left over time, some switched careers.

        In the end, I developed an opinion that runs contrary to what we are told is the problem.

        Young ladies as a demographic are simply not interested in STEM. The first wave of women who graduated college in the early 70's tried out many careers. After the initial experimentation, they settled on careers they liked. Business, medical, financial (for careers considered professional.

        That being said, there are also women who are interested in STEM. I've worked with a number of them, and tthey do

        • Because the framework of teh discussion, the one we are presented with, is me in IT are sexist pigs.

          It is incredibly difficult to have a frank discussion when one party is a raving nutcase who just invents his own facts to support his immovably held views.

          • by Anonymous Coward

            That's why I avoid you.

          • It is incredibly difficult to have a frank discussion when one party is a raving nutcase who just invents his own facts to support his immovably held views.

            You are so right. But we love ya anyway.

    • I have an inclusive and diverse response to this story. It includes the words "fuck", "off" and "die".

      Yay me!

    • These diversity stories:
      -have little, if anything, to do with technology (The sociology of the software industry is not itself technology.)

      If you don't like it, scroll on by.

    • It's really important. Even if you hate this Brown plan for some reason, it could still have a huge affect on your life (and career) for a long time.
      That is why it's News for Nerds.
    • by PhilHibbs ( 4537 )
      It's news that is relevant to nerds, and it is stuff that matters, regardless of which side of the debate you sit.
  • by HornWumpus ( 783565 ) on Saturday February 13, 2016 @04:55PM (#51501963)

    Seriously? Do they send them to a neighboring school for the hard subjects?

  • How can you be "stranded" in Rhode Island? It's what, all of 20 miles over to the next state?

    • Yep. And for those of us from bigger areas: When I contracted there I was constantly overshooting an exit and finding myself in Mass or Conn. No biggie, as it only took five minutes to get back but.....

      Oh, and they don't have enough friggin' street signs either (unless that's changed).

  • by JoshuaZ ( 1134087 ) on Saturday February 13, 2016 @05:00PM (#51501977) Homepage

    One can make substantial criticisms of the way Brown and some other universities are approaching these issues, but the summary seems a bit off. Yes, it is possible to file a complaint about harassment anonymously but the form makes clear that isn't likely to get much attention by itself. The form says "This form is anonymous, unless you choose to provide a contact method in the case of something that requires follow up."

    As for codes of conduct in general, there's a certain fraction of people who aren't apparently happy with them. However, it is pretty clear that a lot of people at conferences and conventions are sexually harassed sometimes severely. Unfortunately, there are circumstances where organizers have erred heavily on the side of not doing anything, and other situations where they've erred too far in the other direction. As always, the key is to strike a reasonable balance, and some issues will always go too far one way or another, and those instances will be used as political ammunition for whichever side the anecdote supports.

    • Re: (Score:1, Flamebait)

      by gnaarly ( 4078217 )
      "Yes, it is possible to file a complaint about harassment anonymously but the form makes clear that isn't likely to get much attention by itself. The form says "This form is anonymous, unless you choose to provide a contact method in the case of something that requires follow up.""

      Why lie? That phrasing in absolutely no way "makes clear that isn't likely to get much attention"

      It is also not "pretty clear" that "a lot of people" are sexually harassed at conferences.

      It's mindboggling that there can e
      • by JoshuaZ ( 1134087 ) on Saturday February 13, 2016 @05:17PM (#51502121) Homepage

        Why lie? That phrasing in absolutely no way "makes clear that isn't likely to get much attention"

        So, this is a common problem to start off: you read something substantially differently than someone else does and you presume that it must come down to them lying. This is not in general a productive approach. And yes, the comment does make it clear, since they note that complains may require followup. What do you think that means?

        It is also not "pretty clear" that "a lot of people" are sexually harassed at conferences.

        Talk to women who regularly go to comic conventions for example.

        It's mindboggling that there can even exist a person to make claims like these. You're a great argument for buying guns - when there exists a cult living in the parallell reality you voice here, then it's very unlikely peaceful conversation can ever produce a sensible result.

        If you think that disagreeing with how common sexual harassment is at conventions and conferences means that someone is worth buying guns so you can defend against them, I think to put it politely that you are so mindkilled http://lesswrong.com/lw/gw/politics_is_the_mindkiller/ [lesswrong.com] that a productive conversation is unlikely to occur whether or not it is "peaceful." Unfortunately, it is people who have attitudes like yours, regardless of what their political allegiances are (whether "MRAs" or "SJWs" or some other group) who make actually having serious discussions about these issues so difficult.

        • Just the fact that we are having this conversation means that no, it isn't clear. To me the intent is that the contact information is only required if the organizers want to contact the complainant for clarification on some point, not if the organizers are to take any action whatsoever.
    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by epyT-R ( 613989 )

      No it's not clear. In fact most of this is made up rubbish by attention whores (eg anita sarkeesian, brianna wu, adria richards, rebecca watson) looking to leech momentum and resources from organizations. Organizers should not be held accountable for behavior between other adult attendees. The key is not always to strike a 'reasonable balance' (whatever that means), but to arrive at the truth.

      • The vast majority of humans don't desire to "leech momentum and resources from organizations" and I would suggest that this may require an update on you mental model of how people work. The examples you actually gave are interesting in that while you've decided that they are all "attention whores" as far as I can tell they are a very mixed bunch of examples with varying degrees of validity or evidence of validity to their claims.

        Organizers should not be held accountable for behavior between other adult attendees. The key is not always to strike a 'reasonable balance' (whatever that means), but to arrive at the truth.

        No one is arguing that truth isn't what matters, but how much effort do you put

        • by epyT-R ( 613989 ) on Saturday February 13, 2016 @09:30PM (#51503533)

          There's a reason these people demand special treatment under the guise of equality.

          1. Rebecca watson was not raped or abused in an elevator. Someone 'might' ( and I say might as there is no evidence) have asked her out, which she declined, and that was the end of it.
          2. Brianna wu was not abused by colbert.
          3. anita sarkeesian was not stereotyped by video games any more than men are.
          4. adria richards was not oppressed by two guys sharing jokes.
          5. zoe quinn was criticized for her sexual behavior tied with buying favor for coverage of her game and 'cause.' She was never criticized for being a woman gamer, developer or anything else. Her game was criticized for sucking and she was criticized for lying.. It was justified. 'Depression quest' is a shitty game and she is a liar.

          There are no vagarities here. None of these are examples of systemic oppression. They are lying opportunists cashing in on the 'social justice' bandwagon for attention and cash.

          I said that the organizers are not responsible for the behavior of attendees. That has nothing to do with understanding whether there was or was not any foul play between attendees.

          • by AmiMoJo ( 196126 )

            Why is it that things which are demonstrably lies get modded +5, just because they rail against Slashdot's favourite boogywomen?

            anita sarkeesian was not stereotyped by video games any more than men are.

            So people shouldn't complain about the quality of food in a restaurant, because other people went to equally bad restaurants, and hay what about those people starving in Africa?!

            Rebecca watson was not raped or abused in an elevator

            True, but it's a great example of giving some reasonable advice (don't act creepy, aside from anything it won't get you laid) and the anti-feminists throwing a shitfit over it.

            zoe quinn was criticized for her sexual behavior tied with buying favor for coverage of her game and 'cause.

            Except, this has long been est

  • You could have hired lecturers instead, but I guess this is more important.
  • Now it is aiming for a mix as average as possible. Next will be that confirmed idiots will get a quota in order to make sure all classes of mental capability are equally represented. This is madness.

  • by dcw3 ( 649211 ) on Saturday February 13, 2016 @05:33PM (#51502227) Journal

    and indoctrinateTAs on issues of diversity.

    FTFY

  • TA at the Ivy League (Score:2, Informative)

    by Niterios ( 2700835 )
    I TAed a class at an Ivy League CS department last semester. It was sad to see that students would rather wait in line to talk to me (a male TA) during office hours than approach the available female TA sitting next to me. This behavior does not help anyone. This is probably the kind of problem that Brown's student advocates will be addressing, not recommending to fire/expell faculty/students or influencing faculty hire decisions.
    • by russotto ( 537200 ) on Saturday February 13, 2016 @07:02PM (#51502679) Journal

      It was sad to see that students would rather wait in line to talk to me (a male TA) during office hours than approach the available female TA sitting next to me.

      For the male students...you're less likely to file sexual harassment charges against them for talking to you.

      • by Anonymous Coward

        As a student....pretty much this. I'm there to learn, I'm not there to worry if my question about tree traversal is some kind of microrape or whatever that's going to get me in trouble later and cost me my Pell grants.

        Posting anonymously so as not to get lynched by a man-hating mob.

      • I understand that some recent news have revealed false accusations leading to disciplinary consequences for the falsely-accused. However, I am yet to hear of a case of successful false accusations occuring at prestigious universities, or of false accusations rising in an alcohol-free, non-private situations. Saying that talking to someone during office hours exposes you to being falsely accused of sexual harassment is an exaggeration. Not even the ultra-conservatives in this university are arguing this.
        • If the false accusations were _successful_, they'd be considered true accusations, so you'd not hear of them as false accusations

          Even if such a fear would not in fact be justified, the current reign of terror vis-a-vis diversity and harassment certainly makes it likely a student would believe such fear was justified.

    • by djinn6 ( 1868030 )
      Do they know she was a TA? Maybe they see a line in front of you and assume you're the only TA there.

      Or maybe, just maybe, it's an unthinkably minuscule possibility for sure, that gender not withstanding, you're better at explaining things.
      • The first possibility you suggested might have been possible but unlikely: we were all wearing staff lanyards. Your seccond suggestion is impossible, none of these kids knew me or my peer.
  • These people are supposed to be educated.

    Instead, they're on a bullshit, zero tolerance (thus zero thought) kick and terrified of being labeled in any way shape or form.

    This is what we're teaching our kids now...

    And people wonder why this country's in trouble. We have mental defectives in charge of education...

  • Have Brown CS tried hiring people based solely on their ability to write code?
    • Have Brown CS tried hiring people based solely on their ability to write code?

      Do you really not understand the logical consequences of your question. Try some reductio ad-absurdum on it.

      If you really, truly mean "solely" then it is entirely fine to hire a mass murdering fugitive from justice who can code extremely well.

      Do you really mean solely?

      • Nice strawman. He forgot to explicitly mention that they should be alive too, why didn't you pick up on that?

        • No, it's not a straw man, it's called "reductio ad absurdum".

          Basically what you're saying is "should accept people solely based on ability to code plus other criteria that I'm not going to admit to but do exist". I'm trying to force to to intellectual honesty by admiting that there are other criteria than just coding ability.

          He forgot to explicitly mention that they should be alive too, why didn't you pick up on that?

          Because then he wouldn't be able to code at all never mind well. That was covered entirely

      • "If you really, truly mean "solely" then it is entirely fine to hire a mass murdering fugitive from justice who can code extremely well."

        The function of the Brown CS department is not to detect serial killers or engage in social engineering, but to teach computer science. Same as it's nobody business at Mozilla if Brendan Eich [reason.com] did contribute to Prop 8. Getting him force out, a shoddy and shameful act of bullying by the SJW crowd.
        • The function of the Brown CS department is not to detect serial killers or engage in social engineering, but to teach computer science.

          Right so are you saying it's OK to hire the fugitive mass murderer then?

          And if that guy starts bumping off students, should they just keep him on until the police catch him?

          Like I said "only" is too strong a word. But once you no longer have it, there is a line beyond which you must concede that coding skills are not the only requisite for the job.

          Same as it's nobody busines

  • I think that discussing these issues is a very important aspect of technology. Although there are those who have posted comments to this article and argued that sociology of technology and technology should not be confused, I completely disagree. As more and more of society depends on the software and technology that the readers of /. produce, the more and more important it becomes that we discuss these issues.

    I was initially proud that /. had decided to post an article about this on its front page. I thoug

  • OK, so getting the bullies kicked out for complaining about our body size, that can only benefit us hacker nerds. If we could only get them kicked out for complaining about our body odour as well, we'd be golden!

  • Does Brown have diversity quotas for the people they hire as Inclusion Advocates? Every time I've seen similar programs the straight white male demographic was seriously under represented.
  • by erp_consultant ( 2614861 ) on Sunday February 14, 2016 @11:40AM (#51505927)

    This is exactly the kind of politically correct garbage that has led to the rise of Donald Trump. Be careful what you wish for. What Brown, and many other Universities I suspect, is doing is reverse discrimination. Plain and simple. White males are getting screwed over at the expense of people of color.

    Were there injustices in the past? Sure, just ask the Jewish, Irish, Chinese and Italians. Not to mention Native Americans. But how does tipping the scales the other way help? All it does is promote resentment. Meanwhile the diversity fanboys prance around claiming the world is a better place.

    What ever happened to earning your way based on merit? Schools, of all places, aught to be promoting this. Education should be the great equalizer. It is one of the few areas where you can succeed solely on hard work, talent and drive. There are countless examples of people that have succeeded in higher education despite coming from disadvantaged backgrounds and despite not being a white male.

    What really makes this infuriating is the corporations lining up to support it. The end game for them is more H1-B visas. By promoting diversity they help to indoctrinate the idea that we should have more people of color in IT jobs. And where do you suppose those people are coming from? Well, they are not coming from the UK or Europe. They are coming primarily from India, China and increasingly from Vietnam and the Philippines. It is nothing more than a cheap source of labor.

    Now getting back to Trump. Love him or hate him events like this are giving rise to people like him. People that see America getting taken advantage of again and again. People that see our generosity being taken for granted. People that observe others that shun our laws. People that see our jobs disappearing. They see all of this and they are pissed off. Pissed off that our elected officials not only stand by and allow it to occur - they actively participate in it.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    In Soviet Russia, the military had a commanding officer. He was placed there on the basis of knowledge of tactics, weapons, command ability, and the ability to enact victory, or at the very least, reduce the gains of an overwhelming enemy. His second (and shadow) was a political control officer. The PCO could supercede the authority of the commander due to political circumstances as they arose (or not). Many a battle was lost (rarely if ever won) because the PCO would take charge in order to "make it lo

  • Outside of the University of Michigan, are there universities that pride themselves on *not* adopting this (or even adopting SJW-hostile admissions)?

  • If I wanted to troll them, I could just send off anonymous emails stating a random, say, 20% of their attendees made "me" feel "uncomfortable", and they would without question kick out 20% of their attendees? I'm sure that'd generate some amazing press and get people to ever go to another one of their events. Let's do it!

  • I'd think that they'd do a bit better academically without having to worry about narratives.

    Outside of the University of Michigan, are there universities that pride themselves on *not* adopting this (or even adopting SJW-hostile admissions)?

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