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United States Government

Ohio Government Websites Hacked With Pro-Islamic State Messages (bloomberg.com) 207

An anonymous reader quotes Bloomberg: The websites of Ohio Governor John Kasich and other state government agencies were hacked on Sunday with a posting professing love for the jihadist group Islamic State. Ten state websites and two servers were affected, and they've been taken off line for an investigation with law enforcement into how the hackers were able to deface them, said Tom Hoyt, a spokesman for the Ohio Department of Administrative Services... The same pro-Islamic State message, accompanied by music, were also shown on Sunday on the website of Brookhaven, a town on New York's Long Island about 50 miles (80 kilometers) from Manhattan, the New York Post reported... Ohio Treasurer Josh Mandel, a Republican candidate for the U.S. Senate in 2018, posted on Facebook that the Department of Rehabilitation and Correction website had been hacked and said, "Wake up freedom-loving Americans. Radical Islam infiltrating the heartland."
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Ohio Government Websites Hacked With Pro-Islamic State Messages

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  • Show of Weakness (Score:4, Insightful)

    by muphin ( 842524 ) on Monday June 26, 2017 @12:11AM (#54689605) Homepage
    They are so pathetic now, they had armies, weapons, even an income.... now they are all but ghosts; now the only way to get some attention is to hack websites...
    Their message is lost, their mission is a failure... all they have now is some semblence of hope those virgins that they were promised... arent male!
    • ...all they have now is some semblence of hope those virgins that they were promised... arent male!

      Some of them might actually prefer that, you know. I'd much rather they ended up with 72 nuns with shotguns.
    • ...and also they'll be burning in hell. Other than that, yeah, good luck.
    • by Tablizer ( 95088 )

      I bet it's not really ISIS, but a troll who either gets off scaring people, or wants to trigger war, hate, etc.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      At least the knife and truck attacks in Europe are actually horrible, but if the best the terrorists can manage most of the time is to find a handful of losers willing to rent a truck and drive it into people, or buy a few knives and stab a few people before getting shot by the police forces a few minutes later, then the security services must be doing some things right. There's always room for improvement (like actually doing something when a community reports people with violent intent), but the terroris

    • by hey! ( 33014 )

      That's all assuming this is ISIS behind this.

      Hacking US state government websites is definitely something ISIS would do if it could. But it's also something other people would do just for the reaction it would get. There are plenty of chaosmongers who are out to get the biggest reaction they can; "This is ISIS, perpare to die," is going to raise a much bigger stink than "Nyah, nyah, you've been hacked luser."

      In a way that works with ISIS's playbook; they're a tiny force about the size of two US National G

  • by Anonymous Coward on Monday June 26, 2017 @12:15AM (#54689617)

    Doesn't anyone find that odd? Describing the U.S. as "heartland?" It sounds more like a conservative hacker pretending to be a stereotype to start something. Reminds me of one of the truck driver hostage videos about 5-6 years ago (may have been longer than that). Days, maybe weeks, of capture and the guy was cleanly shaven and in full marine gear, including his Oakley sunglasses. You can't YouTube that stuff anymore, and I don't think it's a coincidence either. A paradigm shifts towards the other half of a dichotomy brought by hate and now, the legitimacy of those things start to be questioned. I'll get down voted or flagged out of existence, but at least think about the first part of what I said before it does. Heartland? Give me a break.

    • It wouldn't really suprise me. On one side we have daesh lunatics who want to start a convict between Muslims and non-Muslims. On the other side we have a crazy bunch of people that think "that's a really good idea".

      Meanwhile the vast majority of the world are stuck in the middle saying "fuck no, leave us out of this"

      • by jez9999 ( 618189 )

        Actually, most of the world that has had personal experience dealing with Islam is in that "crazy bunch of people" category. It's only some in the West who haven't figured out yet that they don't have a choice whether to be in conflict or not.

        • My primary experiences with Islam is related to some mosques I visited on holidays (impressive buildings), and what I hear in the news about Islamic terrorism and the like (pretty horrible).

          My primary experience with Muslims on the other hand, is a whole different one. Perfectly normal people, and I strongly suspect I've dealt with many more Muslims than I know of. After all, in most cases you just can't tell from looking at a person which religion they follow. I estimate close to 10% of the population here

          • by jez9999 ( 618189 )

            Your experience with Islam is extremely atypical compared with most of the world, and probably has a lot to do with Islam having very low numbers in America (although higher numbers in some parts, where they are of course becoming more demanding).

            Also identifying as a Muslim doesn't make you one. If you had no problem with these people they probably didn't give a damn about the Quran.

            • Your experience with Islam is extremely atypical compared with most of the world.

              That's why the distinction between Islam (what you hear about in the news) and Muslims (those that walk around the streets of your neighbourhood - and those that you meet in the various Muslim countries that I visited, including Bangladesh and Indonesia - the latter being the most populous Muslim country in the world).

              If you had no problem with these people they probably didn't give a damn about the Quran.

              Why do you think that caring about the Quran necessarily results in causing problems for other people, especially non-Muslims? From what I see around me, many Muslims do care a lot about their

              • by jez9999 ( 618189 )

                Why do you think that caring about the Quran necessarily results in causing problems for other people, especially non-Muslims?

                Have you read it? English translations are good enough. It's one of the most spiteful, nasty, hate-filled books ever written. And it's chock full of stuff about either killing infidels or celebrating how much they will suffer in the afterlife.

                • Have you read it? English translations are good enough. It's one of the most spiteful, nasty, hate-filled books ever written. And it's chock full of stuff about either killing infidels or celebrating how much they will suffer in the afterlife.

                  I'll give you a tip: Not every translation that you find on the Internet is correct. And then of course the Old Testament has some rather nasty bits as well.

                • yeah it's right up there with the bible and talmud.

        • Hi, guy with Muslim friends here, I don't subscribe to the ISIS/Western Islamophobe narrative of an inevitable war between civilizations. It's just a relatively small group of nutjobs on the fringes of society (ISIS terrorists and bigots like you) who believe such things.

          The jihadists won't get a grand showdown against all non-jihadists in Dabiq (where they believe they'll get supernatural assistance) and the deplorables won't get their tarted-up race war.

    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward

      The hackers didn't use that word. That word comes from a tweet by the Ohio State Treasurer, who is, surprisingly enough, a Republican.

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by wvmarle ( 1070040 )

      That "heartland" remark is from a US Republican politician, according to both TFS and the first linked article. I do understand that it's sometimes hard to distinguish between IS militants and GOP militants, but there is a difference. Or at least I think there is. There is a difference, right?

    • by Ogive17 ( 691899 )
      Ohio's treasurer, Josh Mandel, made that statement not the hackers.

      I'm from Ohio, our slogan use to be "Ohio, the heart of it all". The state is also shaped a bit like a heart.

      The statement is nothing more than Republicans here drumming up the fear. "Oh no they hacked our website probably from thousands of miles away and that's an attack on our freedom!"

      We have a large population of old white people who eat this stuff up. Mandel is simply campaigning for votes.
    • Doesn't anyone find that odd? Describing the U.S. as "heartland?"

      Heartland is a term commonly used to describe a geographical region of the United States [wikipedia.org]. People on the coasts tend to call it "flyover country," but of course the residents themselves don't seem to like that term.

  • The real problem (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday June 26, 2017 @12:17AM (#54689625)

    "...Josh Mandel, a Republican candidate for the U.S. Senate in 2018, posted on Facebook that the Department of Rehabilitation and Correction website had been hacked and said, "Wake up freedom-loving Americans. Radical Islam infiltrating the heartland.""

    Wake up freedom loving Americans, Douchebag trying to infiltrate the Senate in 2018.

    • Yes, your domestic political opponents are the "real problem". Of course.

      Not a worldwide movement of violent losers, clearly shouting their reasons as they do their horrors, all while you thoughtful folks puzzle over what their motivations might possibly be. Oh no, not them. The "real problem" are your peaceful domestic political opponents.

      • There are douchebags on both sides. (Let's face it, there are only two main choices in U.S. politics, but that's a separate issue.) This guy is just the current example-of-the-day. Any of these pols that engages in self-promoting hyperbole is part of the problem, no matter the party affiliation.

        The fact that you assumed this was an example of an "opponent" seems telling, though.
  • by Anonymous Coward
    Free bacon for every raghead!
  • Well "States Rights" crowd should be hopping up to defend Ohio's new stance from the Federalists soon
  • by Anonymous Coward

    I first read about this on Bloomberg; so I came here to find out about it. I was expecting to hear that it was running a Drupal CMS and that they hadn't done security updates. But all I get is this crap.

  • What did Ohio ever do to anyone? I can understand Washington or New Jersey, but Ohio?
    • by Mal-2 ( 675116 )

      Have you even watched a Browns game in the last couple decades? They were decent exactly once in that entire period and the rest may be regarded as slow torture.

    • What did Ohio ever do to anyone? I can understand Washington or New Jersey, but Ohio?

      I suppose Ohio had hackable servers. That's the difference.

      Nobody said "let's put stuff on Ohio's website". Someone said "let's look for vulnerable servers everywhere in the country and hack everything we find that is vulnerable".

  • mohammed jihad. Which is all these idiots ever say anyway. F islam, mohammed's bones are dust.

  • by bazorg ( 911295 ) on Monday June 26, 2017 @11:30AM (#54692065) Homepage

    These guys are toast. They didn't licence the music properly.

I THINK THEY SHOULD CONTINUE the policy of not giving a Nobel Prize for paneling. -- Jack Handley, The New Mexican, 1988.

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