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Earth Science

Iranian City Soars To Record 129F Degrees: Near Hottest On Earth in Modern Measurements (washingtonpost.com) 376

A city in southwest Iran posted the country's hottest temperature ever recorded Thursday afternoon, and may have tied the world record for the most extreme high temperature. From a report on The Washington Post: Etienne Kapikian, a forecaster at French meteorological agency MeteoFrance, posted to Twitter that the city of Ahvaz soared to "53.7C" (128.7 degrees Fahrenheit). Kapikian said the temperature is a "new absolute national record of reliable Iranian heat" (alternative, non-paywalled source) and that it was the hottest temperature ever recorded in June over mainland Asia. Iran's previous hottest temperature was 127.4. Weather Underground's website indicates the temperature in Ahvaz climbed even higher, hitting 129.2 degrees at both 4:51 and 5 p.m. local time. If that 129.2 degrees reading is accurate, it would arguably tie the hottest temperature ever measured on Earth in modern times.
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Iranian City Soars To Record 129F Degrees: Near Hottest On Earth in Modern Measurements

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  • Survivability (Score:2, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward

    How long can a human survive in 53.7C?

    • by r1348 ( 2567295 )

      How long can a human survive in a mild sauna?

      • How long can a human survive in a mild sauna?

        Maybe a few days if they're on intravenous liquids.

    • Re:Survivability (Score:5, Informative)

      by Geoffrey.landis ( 926948 ) on Friday June 30, 2017 @10:28AM (#54719791) Homepage

      Depends on the humidity.
      You can survive well if you can sweat, but if humidity approaches 100%, you're dead.

    • Humans? At 53.7C? Not good for very long.

      This is why we only hire sub-humans to work the hot aisle of our datacenter.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Friday June 30, 2017 @09:45AM (#54719425)

    Who writes temperatures as "129 degrees"? This is a science and tech site, at very least, if you're going to use outmoded, outdated, antiquated, anachronistic, non-standard, and mostly unused units of measurement, indicate the unit.

    • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

      by Anonymous Coward

      I hate it when people need everything spelled out

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/129th_meridian_east

    • Etienne Kapikian, a forecaster at French meteorological agency MeteoFrance, posted to Twitter that the city of Ahvaz soared to 53.7C (128.7 "degrees Fahrenheit").

      Fixed that for you.

    • by 91degrees ( 207121 ) on Friday June 30, 2017 @09:56AM (#54719513) Journal
      That would be 326.9 Kelvin :)

      It does seem bizarre to talk about "modern measurements" and use outdated units for those measurements.
      • When publishing in s cie nce journal i wouod expect kelvin, in normal news celsius is perfectly acceptable, and i would say fahrenheit too, as long a s the writer is not an idiot and precise the measurement unit . And yes celsius is the modern acceptable unit used by the crushing majority of human on earth.
    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Covered many times before, but I still think Fahrenheit is the best unit for weather temperature.

      0f to 100f is livable.

      0c to 100c is not livable.

      • Maybe not livable, but get a glass of water and as long as it's liquid, you're somewhere between 0 and 100 degrees.

      • by Oswald McWeany ( 2428506 ) on Friday June 30, 2017 @10:13AM (#54719655)

        Covered many times before, but I still think Fahrenheit is the best unit for weather temperature.

        0f to 100f is livable.

        0c to 100c is not livable.

        Who cares if it is "livable"?

        It regularly gets 110F here in summer and people still live. In Canada it often gets below 0F and people live.

        The measurements 0F to 100F were based upon what at the time were perceived as the min and max temperatures the weather reached in Europe. That's not very scientific, even if it is meaningful.

        You can perceive the difference just about in 1C change. You can't perceive the difference in 1F change. A Centigrade is more meaningful to a human being as far as perception goes.

        Overall though... who really cares? If talking about the weather, either system works as long as you are familiar with it.

        • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

          by omnichad ( 1198475 )

          The point is that the scale is more granular for indoor/outdoor temperatures while staying in integer units. For Celsius, you really have to go out to one decimal point to be very accurate with outdoor temperatures. In this case, it was Fahrenheit with an added decimal, because of the fact that it's a very specific record.

          You say I can't perceive a 1 degree F change, but my thermostat moves in 1 degree increments and I do notice a difference based on the setting. And Celsius thermostats tend to all go in

          • The Nest thermostat allows fractional (1/4, 1/3, and 1/2) F* temperature settings. You can easily feel the difference between 76.6 and 77.

        • Who cares if it is "livable"?

          Uh, people that have to live in it?

          It regularly gets 110F here in summer and people still live. In Canada it often gets below 0F and people live.

          But they generally don't live in those temperature. They have airconditioning or heating and try to avoid going out into those temps. It may be possible to survive in those temperatures, but it's not "liveable" in the sense that you're going to be very unhappy about it.

        • by sjbe ( 173966 )

          Who cares if it is "livable"?

          People who want to live.

          It regularly gets 110F here in summer and people still live. In Canada it often gets below 0F and people live.

          You seem to have missed the point. 110F is survivable. 110C is not.

          The measurements 0F to 100F were based upon what at the time were perceived as the min and max temperatures the weather reached in Europe. That's not very scientific, even if it is meaningful.

          That's not true at all [wikipedia.org]. "The lower defining point, 0 F, was established as the temperature of a solution of brine made from equal parts of ice and salt. Further limits were established as the melting point of ice (32 F) and his best estimate of the average human body temperature (96 F, about 2.6 F less than the modern value due to a later redefinition of the scale). The scale is now usually defined by two fixed poi

      • by avandesande ( 143899 ) on Friday June 30, 2017 @10:20AM (#54719727) Journal
        Celsius is like having a amplifier with a volume nob that goes up to 5.5
    • by msauve ( 701917 )

      Who writes temperatures as "129 degrees"?

      Anyone who correctly follows the official BIPM guidelines [bipm.org]. The unit is "degrees Celsius," not Celsius. If symbols are used, then (/. still doesn't handle Unicode) "[degree symbol]C".

    • They actually did (incorrectly) include the measurement in the headline - it says "129C degrees" - according to our esteemed Slashdot editors, any water in that city is boiling off right now.

      Now that's climate change!

    • Who writes temperatures as "129 degrees"?

      Pretty much anyone/everyone in the US. Fahrenheit units are assumed here, especially in contexts were Celsius would make little sense.

      This is a science and tech site, at very least, if you're going to use outmoded, outdated, antiquated, anachronistic, non-standard, and mostly unused units of measurement, indicate the unit.

      No this is a discussion/debate site which historically (less lately) has focused on tech. It also is based in the US and has a predominantly US based readership and I assure you nobody in the US was confused at all. I've be very happy to switch to metric but if someone gives an air temperature of 129 degrees I'm fairly comfortable assuming they aren't talking about Celsi

    • Who writes temperatures as "129 degrees"? This is a science and tech site, at very least, if you're going to use outmoded, outdated, antiquated, anachronistic, non-standard, and mostly unused units of measurement, indicate the unit.

      Ah, the virtue-signaling, it burns, lol

    • Who writes temperatures as "129 degrees"? This is a science and tech site, at very least, if you're going to use outmoded, outdated, antiquated, anachronistic, non-standard, and mostly unused units of measurement, indicate the unit.

      I petitioned these folks [wikipedia.org] for years on the very same matter. No luck.

    • by T.E.D. ( 34228 )

      The text is from a quote in a US newspaper. I suppose the editors could have babied you and put in a translation for your sensitive foreign eyes. However, this website is ALSO hosted in the US, and most of its editors and audience are US-based. So realistically, if you can't abide by seeing US units on things treated as the default, perhaps you should consider visiting non-US websites. I hear there are a lot of them on the interwebs these days.

      One wonders if you demand your friends immediately replace the

  • Won't it be fun in coming decades when most of the Middle East beats it for less insufferably hot parts of the world?
  • 129 degrees?? (Score:3, Informative)

    by OzPeter ( 195038 ) on Friday June 30, 2017 @09:54AM (#54719493)

    Wow .. the water must be boiling in the streets!

    Oh .. you mean 54 degrees .. like was mentioned in TFA

    The information comes from Etienne Kapikian, a meteorologist with Meteo France, the French national weather service.

    Officially, he said the temperature was 53.7 degrees Celsius, which is 128.7 degrees Fahrenheit. Iran’s previous hottest temperature was 127.4 degrees.

  • Mesopotamia? (Score:5, Interesting)

    by skovnymfe ( 1671822 ) on Friday June 30, 2017 @09:54AM (#54719497)
    Isn't Iran in the old Mesopotamia region? The one that almost died out way-back-when because of sudden climate change? I suppose it wouldn't be much of a surprise if that's the first region to go again in the next sudden climate change.
    • by nnet ( 20306 )
      yes, that event was called The Flood, ask Noah about it, allegedly he witnessed it...
      • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

        by Anonymous Coward

        Let me explain this. The myth of the flood was caused by a real fact, which was the breaking of the ice dam that contained the Agassiz Lake [see Wikipedia], in North America, in the final days of the last Ice Age. The lake was the size of today's Black Sea, and all the water was released at once. Sea level rose up very quickly. This event was the basis for the Flood myth and, as a matter of fact, created the already mentioned Black sea and the English Channel/La Manche, among other fetures.

        It's easy when yo

  • Bullshit (Score:2, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward

    The hottest temperature recorded in Death Valley was 134 F on July 10, 1913, nearly 100 years ago, which is still modern times since people who were alive then are STILL alive. Good try, though.

    • Except meteorologists now think that reading by a mining company employee was false and not possible. The record then is 129.2 degrees F

  • by pecosdave ( 536896 ) on Friday June 30, 2017 @09:56AM (#54719519) Homepage Journal

    I have seen very close to that - my home town made it to 128 one summer.

    The thing is it was such a shit-hole of a town there are no official weather stations there. All the official measurements were taken miles away in Odessa or other shit-hole towns they happened to put weather stations in or around. Pecos just was ignored, and was in a unique place geological being in a wide plane surrounded by mountain ranges and higher elevations, it created a type of hot-box effect. I was driving a 1983 GMC Sierra Classic at the time. The little orange needle that showed if you were in PRND1-2 melted in half and the spring pulled it to the left. My sisters walkman melted in it.

    So, due to all of the locals reading their own thermometers and the local channel 6 (which was just a CGA graphics info readout) saying it got up to 128 I know it was there. Since Kermit Texas some miles to the North never made it that high we never officially made it there.

    That was in 1994 I believe. As far as I know it hasn't passed 118 or so since. My dad tells me in 75 or so when he was working the feedlots it got up to about 132. I wasn't born yet so I certainly can't confirm that one.

    At least in my little world both the hot and the cold extremes have tapered based on my own limited observations. The rains have become more erratic, but having moved away from that area my own observations are no longer current.

    • 111 fahrenheit is this year's high in Midland/Odessa... probably got up to 118-120 in Pecos.
    • Pecos huh? Nice gas station there. Nearly got bit by a rattlesnake near Pecos a couple of years ago. Enjoy your fame, friend!
      • I didn't even visit for a ten year stretch, not that I didn't want to go see my sister, life just stacked up and kept me from heading West.

        Then for reasons unrelated to hitting on her I talked to a friends little sister. Well, now I'm married to a home-town girl and I visit several times a year - and I just have to live with the party foul of hooking up with a friends sister...

        For people unfamiliar with the area - unless it's rodeo week or something there isn't much of a reason to visit Pecos unless there'

    • There's more than a million people in Ahvaz. For reference, that's about the size of Seattle and Denver combined.
  • Near highest ever? (Score:5, Interesting)

    by planckscale ( 579258 ) on Friday June 30, 2017 @09:57AM (#54719529) Journal
    The official highest recorded temperature is now 56.7C (134F), which was measured on 10 July 1913 at Greenland Ranch, Death Valley, California, USA. So yeah it's pretty high but call me when it gets to 135F.
  • As in "I Ran away from that country to get away from the heat".
  • a dose of reality (Score:5, Informative)

    by ooloorie ( 4394035 ) on Friday June 30, 2017 @10:17AM (#54719687)

    Recorded high temperatures in Ahvaz in July are 129.2F, [wikipedia.org] so this isn't the highest on record even for that city. It's a record for June, but, hey, it's the end of June. Ahvaz also holds the record as the "world's most air-polluted city". Incidentally, they do get snow in the winter. What a place!

    • by Dunbal ( 464142 ) *
      If this cooling trend continues we should be seeing absolute zero temperatures within 50 years! Quick, tax all ice cubes!
    • That isn't even the hottest temperature on earth, death valley which is 300' below sea level has always had the highest temperature record for earth.

      The hottest air temperature ever recorded in Death Valley was 134 F (56.7 C) on July 10, 1913, at Furnace Creek, which is the hottest atmospheric temperature ever recorded on earth. During the heat wave that peaked with that record, five consecutive days reached 129 F (54 C) or above.

  • Why is the figure in Celsius given with scare-quotes? Both Iran and France, and 95% of the world, uses Celsius - not really anything scary about it.

  • Must be that global cooling!

    Okay, I got that out of my system. Move along, nothing to see here.

  • Because that's who decides who's going to be US president, and consequently person who can do the most about the global warming

  • by slew ( 2918 ) on Friday June 30, 2017 @12:42PM (#54720717)

    The record is currently 134 degrees F from July 10, 1913, in Death Valley...
    But that doesn't fit the narrative of "modern AGW times"...

    Even in more modern times, back in 2013, Death Valley reached 53.9C [wikipedia.org] (besting this latest temperature in Ahvaz by 0.2C)... Of course back in 2013, we weren't as modern as we are today...

    Anything for click-bait these days, right?

  • To people saying water doesn't boil. Actually, water does boil in the streets. the 53 celsius is temperature without presense of sunlight. in sunlight we're talking well above 90 degrees celsius, wish I was joking but I'm not.
    If you just sit in a car without turning the AC on for half an hour the belt buckle can leave a mark on your arm for the rest of your life, talking 3rd degree burn here. The steering wheel can get stuck to your hand if you put your hand on it directly. my father's car has a LOT of his finger prints permanently molded into the plastic. You can cook omlets on the dashboard or on the roof.
    If there is a fly still alive in that weather --this one is actually funny-- if it lands on a car or any other metalic surface, it can't take off again.
    Only glass covered solar panels work, other types just melt. The wiring almost always melts too.
    Car batteries die a lot.
    Plastic bottles, sprays, cans, jars and anything with a lid exploding is just normal. One time, After few hours of leaving the car in sunlight I found it covered with a fine white powder as if it was painted, after hours of thinking, finding small pieces of metal and recalling who has been in the car with what items we figured out it was a deodorant spray left in the car under a tissue box in the sleeve behind the driver seat.
    You just can't have cds in the car. they fuse together like slices of butter melting.
    We don't have cement buildingi or cement park chairs. They just turn to dust REALLY fast.
    and to those saying fix it with water, there isn't even enough water to drink.

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