Catch up on stories from the past week (and beyond) at the Slashdot story archive

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
United States Crime Google Apple

Apple and Google Are Rerouting Their Employee Buses as Attacks Resume (mashable.com) 292

Slashdot reader sqorbit writes: Apple runs shuttle buses for it's employees in San Francisco. It seems someone who is not happy with Apple has decided to take out their anger on these buses. In an email obtained by Mashable, Apple states "Due to recent incidents of broken windows along the commute route, specifically on highway 280, we're re-routing coaches for the time being. This change in routes could mean an additional 30-45 minutes of commute time in each direction for some riders." It has been reported that at least four buses have had windows broken, some speculating that it might caused by rubber bullets.
"Around four years ago, people started attacking the shuttle buses that took Google employees to and from work, as a way of protesting the tech-company-driven gentrification taking place around San Francisco," remembers Fortune, adding "it seems to be happening again."

At least one Google bus was also attacked, according to the San Francisco Chronicle, which adds that the buses "were not marked with company logos, and the perpetrators are suspected of broadly targeting technology shuttle buses rather than a specific company."
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Apple and Google Are Rerouting Their Employee Buses as Attacks Resume

Comments Filter:
  • by Sigvatr ( 1207234 ) on Sunday January 21, 2018 @03:33AM (#55970717)
    Reminds me of that isolate tribe of people on a remote island who throws spears at helicopters.
    • by Anonymous Coward

      It reminds me that my grandfather with a high school degree could buy a house in my town, my parents with college degrees could, but even with a Master's I am hard-pressed to do so.

      Maybe if we encouraged density over NIMBYism we wouldn't be held in regulatory capture by today's feudal landlording class.

    • by msauve ( 701917 )
      Maybe if they threw some iPhones and Pixels out the bus windows along the route they'd be worshiped [wikipedia.org].
    • "Reminds me of that isolate tribe of people on a remote island who throws spears at helicopters."

      Firearms against civilians reminds me of domestic terrorism.

    • Reminds me of the people who shoot at drones as a general procedure

    • Spears? I will check into that.
  • by 93 Escort Wagon ( 326346 ) on Sunday January 21, 2018 @03:35AM (#55970727)

    After all, San Francisco was a quiet, inexpensive little town to live in - right up until Apple and Google moved into the area. In fact, no one had even heard of the place until around 2000.

    • by aepervius ( 535155 ) on Sunday January 21, 2018 @05:05AM (#55970897)
      You are making a bad joke at the expanse of those folk living there... But the reality is that *inflation adjusted* rent and house price are insane. e.g. https://medium.com/@mccannatro... [medium.com]

      https://cdn-images-1.medium.com/max/1600/1*MdPAr5dt5AH73H1mO_NahQ.jpeg

      It is CPI adjusted so reflects indeed an appreciation/gentrification rather than inflation.

      Even if you are house owner you can easily understand what this means : imagine your house which had a monthly cost of 600$-700$ (inflation adjusted cost) now has a monthly average cost of 4000$. Would you be able to keep it ? no ? Well that is what is happening to some people, and those with the weakest salaries are pushed further and further away meaning their cost increase both in time cost (travel time) and in transportation cost, or go in worst neighborhood if you can.

      Basically I forsee a wall coming to SF bay area, something will have to break.
      • What has succh an influence on 'cost of the house' when you _own_ it?

        • I was saying if you are property owner, to get a representation of the plight the renter suffer in the bay area, IMAGINE that your house cost (property tax, reparation cost etc...) went from 600$ to 4000$... Are you getting it now ? It would make it unlivable and you would have to sell. And no buying a new one would not help if it has the SAME 4000$ price tag. You would be out priced for housing and pushed outward... which is what is happening for a lot of folk. And quite a lot of people on slashdot are har
          • I was saying if you are property owner, to get a representation of the plight the renter suffer in the bay area, IMAGINE that your house cost (property tax, reparation cost etc...) went from 600$ to 4000$... Are you getting it now ? It would make it unlivable and you would have to sell. And no buying a new one would not help if it has the SAME 4000$ price tag. You would be out priced for housing and pushed outward... which is what is happening for a lot of folk. And quite a lot of people on slashdot are hard at grasping at that.

            The part I'm having trouble grasping is why someone forced you or anyone to live and work there. If housing is ridiculously overpriced in my area, I'll sell my house move to another area and pocket the profit. As I noted before, I could have worked in places like DC or Cali, but some simple math told me I was better off living and working in a less crowded market. I was making roughly 80 percent of what I could get there, and living costs were roughly half.

            But hey, if you signed a contract that requires

      • by cstacy ( 534252 )

        You are making a bad joke at the expanse of those folk living there... But the reality is that *inflation adjusted* rent and house price are insane.

        Basically I forsee a wall coming to SF bay area, something will have to break.

        Google will build a wall, and make SF pay for it!

      • ? Well that is what is happening to some people, and those with the weakest salaries are pushed further and further away meaning their cost increase both in time cost (travel time) and in transportation cost, or go in worst neighborhood if you can. Basically I forsee a wall coming to SF bay area, something will have to break.

        But someone is apparently paying those prices. Me? Unless I was making enough money to afford to live near my work, I'd not be employed there. A friend's daughter works in SF, makes 6 figures, and has to have a roommate to make ends meet. But she does it. I suspect for bragging rights.

        I could have lived and worked in DC or Cali, But some simple math told me that although I'd be paid more, my overall financial condition would be worse.

        tl;dr version - As long as people are willing to pay the price, the

        • by Mitreya ( 579078 )

          Participation in the madness is voluntary.

          Not for someone who was already renting there. Some are protected by rent control, but I am sure not all.
          You are on point for anyone who actively moves to SF now.

      • by Ichijo ( 607641 )

        You are making a bad joke at the expanse of those folk living there... But the reality is that *inflation adjusted* rent and house price are insane.

        Other than the folk living there, who keeps voting against the housing developments that would increase housing supply and lower home prices and rents in the area?

      • by JBMcB ( 73720 )

        Even if you are house owner you can easily understand what this means : imagine your house which had a monthly cost of 600$-700$ (inflation adjusted cost) now has a monthly average cost of 4000$.

        The cost would only go up if you were renting. There are usually caps on property tax increases to avoid things like that happening to homeowners. Even if property taxes shot up, you could rent out your house for a bunch of money to make up for it. You'd have to move, but if rents are that high you could probably pay off the mortgage pretty quickly that way.

        If you owned your house you could sell it for a tidy profit, or keep it as you saw fit. If you don't own your own house, you can't really complain about

    • by Tailhook ( 98486 )

      The old gentry doesn't like being pushed out by the new gentry.

    • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday January 21, 2018 @07:19AM (#55971175)

      Never lived in SF, but I grew up somewhere a megacorp set up shop.

      At first, everyone was really excited, because there were going to be all these jobs! Hooray! There were some construction jobs whilst it was being built; folks bought new houses, new trucks. It was pretty nice. Unfortunately when it was done, the only jobs that the locals were qualified for were janitorial, canteen and security. Not surprising; Rural Nowhere doesn't have a massive stock of biotech scientists and chemical engineers just sat waiting for a pharma plant to be built.

      But at least the area was going to get rich off the taxes, right? Well, see, to get the plant, the state and municipality had cut a special deal for "innovating job creators", so the firm was basically getting paid to be here. 90% of property taxes go to the state, so even though property tax revenues would be higher, the local services wouldn't see much of it.

      As people moved in from out of state (mostly existing employees of the company from plants they'd shut down, but some new hires), a few people in town made what they thought was a pretty penny selling property to them. Of course, the house prices in Nowhere were pretty low, so when they tried to use the money to buy elsewhere, they couldn't get as much house as they'd sold. When house prices started to rocket, rents got jacked up, and any locals who were renting was basically SOL. No way you could work at the gas station and pay rent on a one-bed apartment, so you'd better get real friendly with someone real fast or move back in with your folks.

      The company knew they were sending their employees out to Nowhere, so they'd planned ahead. Subsidised employee daycare, canteen, gym, even a subsidised laundry and convenience store on site. Outside the fence, the local shops and services had to either compete with the subsidised prices or accept that most of the company folk weren't ever going to come in.

      The local schools got swamped with new kids; rich and poor kids mixing there was about the only good thing to come out of it. Of course, there wasn't a lot of extra money to deal with it, and the huge wealth disparity definitely caused some problems. Suddenly parents were demanding more AP classes, more after-school clubs and activities and generally expecting higher standards. Some of that was good - I wouldn't have got where I am without it - but the budget-strapped school spending resources on activities that only a few could afford to do created a lot of tension. We had a new swimming pool and textbooks that were falling apart; of course company kids had shiny new ones their parents had ordered for them.

      After ten years, the house prices had increased from about 25% below to 50% above the state average; about half the existing population had been forced out by rising property prices and rents, many local businesses had been empty for years due to the loss of trade and the competition from subsidised on-site businesses. I've just graduated with a relevant STEM degree (I actually got a small bursary from the company and the offer of an interview if I maintained a 3.5 GPA), and the company has decided to shut down the plant. They've come up with a new way to make the thing they were producing, and it's cheaper to build a new plant in a new town (with new tax breaks, of course) than to update their existing plant. So in a few months they will be gone, as will half of the town's population. Anyone who struggled to buy a house there or took out a second mortgage to exploit the rising value will be underwater, and we'll be left with really nice school and no kids to fill it, and thus no money to maintain it.

      The company attached itself to our town like a parasite; they used the existing public infrastructure for their own benefit without without paying a dime. They broke the local economy, made it depend on them, and then cast it aside when it was no longer convenient, leaving behind a dying husk of what used to be a small but pleasant town. The worst part is that the best and brightest of the local kids are now working for the company, and excited to move to this new picturesque little town across the state where the new plant is being built... myself included.

      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        by ScentCone ( 795499 )
        So what you're saying is that your own local officials that you elected to office handled the whole thing very badly because they couldn't be troubled to look into how this sort of thing works. But at least you did get around to telling us you're personally the best and brightest.
        • So what you're saying is that nothing is ever the fault of a big megacorp.

          • So what you're saying is that nothing is ever the fault of a big megacorp.

            No, what I'm saying is ... exactly what I said.

        • by fgouget ( 925644 )

          But at least you did get around to telling us you're personally the best and brightest.

          He's just saying he was lucky to go through school at the right time.

        • Given the competition over Amazon's second headquarters and sports stadiums, think this is a pretty common "short sightedness"

      • by Entrope ( 68843 )

        So which "state" was this? In the US, property taxes are usually assessed and collected by local (county, city, town, etc.) governments, and that's what funds local services like police and schools. 90% of them don't go to any state that I know of.

      • I wish I had mod points. You know how to tell a story.
    • by hey! ( 33014 )

      San Francisco used to be one of my favorite places before the tech boom. And yes, it was a very different kind of place in the 70s and 80s. It's a lot like Key West, or Waikiki. Rich people are attracted to a place because of the funky character, then the money they bring in turns it into an EPCOT version of itself.

  • by hcs_$reboot ( 1536101 ) on Sunday January 21, 2018 @03:43AM (#55970743)
    that's not rubber bullets, these are old unusable iPhones.
  • It's ironic how some of the biggest internet companies couldn't figure out how to get work done without having everyone physically present. All of these location-dependent problems would go away if they just allowed their employees to telecommute.
    • Re:Telecommuting (Score:5, Insightful)

      by tlhIngan ( 30335 ) <<ten.frow> <ta> <todhsals>> on Sunday January 21, 2018 @06:50AM (#55971099)

      It's ironic how some of the biggest internet companies couldn't figure out how to get work done without having everyone physically present. All of these location-dependent problems would go away if they just allowed their employees to telecommute.

      Some problems are solvable by telecommuting, some problems aren't.

      Stuff that involves hardware (which hey, Apple does a lot of) really cannot be done by telecommuting until you get full telepresence robots (and even then, some things really require you to be there - engineer's knack, for example). Expensive test equipment may be utilized, or even just general tools like oscilloscopes. And then there's physical hardware that requires transportation, Apple's already secretive enough that new hardware has to be locked up and multiple layered security (so fat chance bringing it home).

      There's also a lot of value in bringing the team together - collaboration can be much faster. Perhaps you come up with a cool idea, but then instead of just walking down the hall and presenting it, you have to type it up in an email or worse yet, the company IRC-like chat room (slack, whatever) and everyone misunderstands you so you spend another hour re-describing it. And heaven forbid you need to draw something...

      • What is it with drawing indeed? It's XXI century and there are no tools that can replace good old scribbling on a whiteboard with the same efficiency.

  • Rubber bullets rarely break windows. Also, this is California we're talking about. I think rubber bullets are illegal even in Wisconsin where I live. Also, they're not called rubber bullets, they're rubber shot because they go in shot cups inside shot shells inside shotguns. You know what's easy to get in CA? BB guns and slingshots. Let's be real, here, people. I mean they're just making things up. It could have been bigfoot, or particle accelerators, or ultra high energy cosmic rays.
    • Rubber bullets are not rubber, they are usually a steel slug with a thin rubber coating.
  • I offer an alternative to riding on either Google's or Apples buses here. [youtube.com] Considering being an old fart is a sin at both of these hip joints. Eat my shit... I use Linux and get the things done with an efficiency that you can only dream about coming from your young genderfied smurfs slaves! Of course I am not welcome in either Redmond, Cupertino or Mountainview. Eat my dust I am on the Magic Bus of just about anything with a bus and a proc and can smoke you guys when it comes to picking up the chicks on a b
    • by Mal-2 ( 675116 )

      Oh good, I heard timecube.com was looking for a new writer.

    • by gtall ( 79522 )

      Maybe you should take the little pink pills next time?

  • by DrXym ( 126579 )
    Get the cops or private detectives to run a bait bus up and down the route and if somebody attacks it they arrest / detain the perp.
    • by gtall ( 79522 )

      Right, all the cops and private detectives need to do is look for the neon sign over the perp, "Perp right here!". Easy.

      • by DrXym ( 126579 )
        Use your head and see if you can guess how the cops would identify the perp. I'll give you a clue - it's much the same way as cops staking out a bank determine who the robbers are.
  • by M0j0_j0j0 ( 1250800 ) on Sunday January 21, 2018 @06:08AM (#55971015)

    Which Windows? 7 10 XP?

  • Maybe it's just a cover for bugs in the mapping software...
  • We all love Capitalism. Except when we hate it.

    I grew up in California. Well into the 80s you could actually ride the cable cars without waiting in line for hours or taking out a second mortgage. You could even find a parking spot at Fisherman's Wharf.

    Sigh

  • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday January 21, 2018 @07:42AM (#55971223)

    I was economically ejected from the place I grew up in and which I love the most in the world. So on behalf of all of us middle class folk who don't work for a mega IT corporation, fuck Apple, fuck Google, and fuck all the rest of the corporate slave masters too.

    I and my children cannot live there because we were not born into walth, and in my chosen profession one must live like a slave if they stay in the SF bay, with horrendous commutes, insane living costs and crushing mortgages.

    To all of you who have not suffered through poverty until forced out of the SF region, fuck you too. You do not understand why we are so enraged, and should shut up with your defense of these soulless corporate monsters. I earned good money, had a good career, and it wasn't enough to ever buy a home or have a comfortable life.

    AAAARRRRGGGHHH! It pisses me off.

  • And it should be punished harder. Find the hooligans, and hang 'em up with proper inscription tags on all the routes.

  • by mattr ( 78516 ) <mattr@teleb o d y .com> on Sunday January 21, 2018 @08:18AM (#55971345) Homepage Journal

    Google Street View cams and self driving car tech might be able to catch who is attacking the busses. Or just a video camera?

  • Cali politicians act like parasites [sacbee.com] to advance their failed political policies [latimes.com] and transportation boondoggles [cbslocal.com].

  • Apple didn't start out in S.F.
    Google didn't start out in S.F.

    Companies that big can locate their offices anywhere they want.
    Pick almost any city along route 5, and the housing prices for your employees would be an order of magnitude less.

  • Hmmmm, I can see two possibilities for who is doing this: a disgruntled employee, or Uber
  • by stikves ( 127823 ) on Sunday January 21, 2018 @04:46PM (#55973899) Homepage

    This is a basic supply issue on the housing market. However I don't see an easy solution. (There are simple solutions but implementing them would be really hard).

    The area seems to vote against their longer term interest for small gains in short time. Cities roll over each other to get more tech jobs -- look at what's happening with Amazon HQ2 -- however almost none in the Bay Area want to host the employees of these tech companies in their boundaries. They enact all kinds of barriers against entry, yet what this ultimately causes is pain to existing residents.

    The market is about 99% saturated. Any house that goes onto market for rent or sale is gobbled up in about a week or so, and I read that there was only 12 days of rolling supply. If buyers dot not bit ridiculously high prices for buying, or renters want basic amenities to be fixed (like broken sewer system), they lose to the competition. It is a race to the bottom.

    The simple solution would be improving the supply. This can be done by updating zoning laws, changing parking limits, and repealing Prop 13 to improve schools, and re-balance economy. However all of them, while simple, affects existing residents in a very bad way, and there is little to no hope of ever getting any of them thru. People have looted their 401k, and went into significant debt to buy falling apart shacks at million dollar prices, and they would not want to wake up to a reality that their property is not actually worth that much.

    So basically no solution in the short term.

To invent, you need a good imagination and a pile of junk. -- Thomas Edison

Working...