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Businesses Social Networks The Almighty Buck

Data Science is America's Hottest Job (bloomberg.com) 79

Anonymous readers share a report: It turns out that even in the wake of Facebook's privacy scandal and other big-data blunders, finding people who can turn social-media clicks and user-posted photos into monetizable binary code is among the biggest challenges facing U.S. industry. People with data science bona fides are among the most sought-after professionals in business, with some data science Ph.Ds commanding as much as $300,000 or more from consulting firms.

Job postings for data scientists rose 75 percent from January 2015 to January 2018 at Indeed.com, while job searches for data scientist roles rose 65 percent. A growing specialty is "sentiment analysis," or finding a way to quantify how many tweets are trashing your company or praising it. A typical data scientist job pays about $119,000 at the midpoint of salaries and rises to $168,000 at the 95th percentile, according to staffing agency Robert Half Technology.

Data Science is America's Hottest Job

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  • by jellomizer ( 103300 ) on Friday May 18, 2018 @12:13PM (#56633510)

    On a SQL based server if you do a left inner or and outer join on an other table, you can use logic to connect two data elements together.

    Quite honestly that is all that I see Data Scientist consultants do. Then they make a graph of the data and get paid big bucks. Vs. our poor schlubs who are not called Data Scientists who do the same thing, and get yelled at for asking the same questions.

    • by schematix ( 533634 ) on Friday May 18, 2018 @12:28PM (#56633574) Homepage
      You forgot they add a GROUP BY and ORDER BY clause too. There's where the real money is at.
    • The PivotTables impress more than just a regular Excel chart, especially if you include lots of unnecessary data slicers for them to poke at.
    • At a previous job, I was using a splunk app (hasn't been updated since 2014) to get hockey scores for my boss for his daily dashboard readout. Supposedly being able to write a bunch of stuff to throw people a report gleaned from Splunk or an ELK stack is big business. However, it is something a sysadmin winds up doing often, just as one does SQL stuff for reporting as well.

    • Most of the "Data Scientist" positions could be filled by training existing data engineers or DBAs. You need one data scientist for every ten data engineers. If you hire a Data Scientist without having competent data engineering team that understands the strategy (you do have an informed strategy don't you?) just prepare to look stupid wasting a shit-ton of money.

      • by godrik ( 1287354 ) on Friday May 18, 2018 @01:29PM (#56633992)

        If you can train an existing DBA to be a data scientist quickly, then you don't really need a data scientist. Data science is about modeling complex phenomenon. It is about building statistical models, analyzing statistical significance, connecting pieces of an incomplete puzzle.
        It really has little in common with what a DBA usually does. Yes, they'll both write programs. Yes, they'll both use a bunch of data. Yes, they probably both took calculus II. But the commonalities stop here.
        A physicist, MD, algorithmician, or economist would probably be closer to being data scientists than a system oriented DBA.

    • by jythie ( 914043 )
      Eh, that is a bit like saying all programmers do is type stuff into an IDE, hit 'run', and show off that the thing compiled. Getting paid big bucks is not about making one or two pretty graphs, but about taking lots of data, figuring out which pieces can be pulled together for what insights, then structuring those insights into an actionable narrative that consumers of the reports can then turn around and do things with. The best paid ones probably do not even interact with the data directly, but have dat
      • by doom ( 14564 )

        Eh, that is a bit like saying all programmers do is type stuff into an IDE, hit 'run', and show off that the thing compiled.

        *ssssh...*

    • by garcia ( 6573 )

      Maybe you should have been modded as "Funny", instead? Because, as a Data Engineer who works side by side with Data Science, I can absolutely guarantee you, in many cases, they are not very good at doing anything at all in SQL; they are way more into pre-built R and/or Python packages to do their work.

      The real fucking heroes are the Data Engineers (ETL guys for you old schoolers) who are doing the operational pipelining of the data flows in and out of the models built in isolation by Data Scientists.

    • Fawk! I'm changing my self appointed job title to Senior Data Scientist Block Chain Crypto Programmer.
    • by ceoyoyo ( 59147 )

      From what I've seen, "data scientist" means someone who can run a prepackaged machine learning or simple stats program on some data without knowledge of or much regard for how it was collected or what it represents.

      I.e. "data scientist" is kind of like a regular scientist except without the deep domain knowledge, skills and scientific method.

      • by rtb61 ( 674572 )

        Nope, what they are doing is confusing the term, data scientist with data analyst. Get away from the silliness that writing data formulas are all that flash, what is important is knowing what data is important, not the data formulas to dig it out. So the idea of the composite of a very experienced data analysts, where is it their broad knowledge across a broad range of subjects that gives them insight into valuable data and that bit of knowledge that allows them to write data formulas. It is knowing what da

    • by Anonymous Coward

      On a SQL based server if you do a left inner or and outer join on an other table, you can use logic to connect two data elements together.

      Quite honestly that is all that I see Data Scientist consultants do. Then they make a graph of the data and get paid big bucks. Vs. our poor schlubs who are not called Data Scientists who do the same thing, and get yelled at for asking the same questions.

      Says the guy who can't even spell science correctly.

      Did you even RTFA? Even the summary states that sentiment analysis is one of the main reasons data science is hot. A goddamn join isn't going to help you classify a document.

    • Re: (Score:1, Funny)

      by Anonymous Coward

      The hottest job seems to be Presidential apologist anyway. They hire more of those mealy mouthed lying traitors every day to replace the ones going to prison.

    • by novakyu ( 636495 )

      Eh. But to do that, you need years of education and training. Being a "data scientist" could be done after one summer boot camp!

      I imagine data scientists are like consultants: a huge range in value added (or subtracted) by any particular "data scientist".

  • by rockmuelle ( 575982 ) on Friday May 18, 2018 @12:48PM (#56633696)

    Web Master was the hottest job 20 years ago. Right up until every realized that the position was better filled via a mix traditional IT techs and software engineers.

    Data science will go the same way, but it will be software engineers and statisticians that replace the current crop of bootcamp trained data "scientists". (actually, all real data science shops already do it that way... the market will correct)

  • by cascadingstylesheet ( 140919 ) on Friday May 18, 2018 @12:50PM (#56633710)

    finding people who can turn social-media clicks and user-posted photos into monetizable binary code

    I'm immobile because I can't figure out which part of that to gnaw to shreds first.

    • by ceoyoyo ( 59147 )

      Why? That seemed like the sanest line in the whole summary. That seems like pretty much what most data scientists do.

  • " People with data science bona fides are among the most (sought-after) hated professionals in business, "

  • They sit right next to the social media consultants.

    Shame it's not legal to wrap them in barbed wire and shoot them into the sun - which is the only adequate treatment I can think of.

  • Posit hypothesis

    Run experiment to validate or reject hypothesis

    So it seems that we now need data scientists to do things with data that were supposed to be done by OLAP systems, i.e. find correlations between dimensions that were not supposed to be trivial? Data mining?

  • Am I the only one who sees some slight similarities to the First Dotcom Bubble? Obviously data analysis is a very useful skill to have, but I think it's going to get to the point where anyone running a sanitized data set through an R or Python package will be a Data Scientist. We've already got the AI, Blockchain and Data Science bootcamps cranking people out now! In fact, I thought I read the other day that some survey proclaimed AI as the hottest job.

    I think this bubble is going to last a very long time a

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