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Slashback News

Slashback: Picnic, Pistol, Doggedness 143

Posted by timothy
from the inner-ellicott-city dept.
Slashback tonight brings you updates on low-power hardware, unauthorized music distribution by buymusic.com, and more, including a reminder of the upcoming (now annual) Linux picnic at the conclusion of LWCE. (If you're not there, start your own local chapter ;)) Read on for more!

MenuetOS progresses. For those with a taste for esoteric tiny operating systems for low-power systems, the x86 release of Contiki wasn't the only news this week. Lgd writes "Menuet, the 100 % assembly OS, has made quite a few improvements since it was last reported at Slashdot. Menuet has now a simple tcp/ip stack with tiny http, mp3 and email servers, FASM 1.48 assembler and demo applications like the 3d maze."

Perhaps this will lead to a finer toothed comb overall. Jody Whitesides writes "Hello, I want to take a moment to update you about my situation that you posted recently... As of right now, I won my fight with BuyMusic and the Orchard. I have been promptly let out of a contract that was already terminated February 1st of 2001. It seems they had kept me in their catalog on a contract clause that had been overlooked when the contract was signed back in 1999.

As of 5 p.m. pst 07/31/2003 I was given notice that I was removed from the Orchard's distribution. In turn I have since checked with BuyMusic's website and have been swiftly removed from the website and now all has been set right in the world. It seems that even the big corporations don't wish to face copyright infringement.

I want to thank you for running the story as I have no doubt that it helped bring a swift decision in getting my music under my control so that I can best determine how fans will get it into their hands.

I harbor no ill will towards BuyMusic or the Orchard."

MandrakeSoft still not dead (wants to go for a walk). LinuxGeek8 writes "In their latest shareholder newsletter MandrakeSoft made a few statements about their financial position. Their retail sales decreased, while their high-margin sales (oem, club, online sales, etc.) increased. In total their revenue decreased somewhat, while the operating loss decreased. Since January they have been cash-flow positive.

Quoting about their "Chapter 11": "On January 27th, 2003, the Commercial Court granted MandrakeSoft a six month observation and protection period (similar to a U.S. Chapter 11 procedure). This period will end on July 27th, 2003. The company is pursuing an opportunity to be granted an additional six month observation and protection period. In the upcoming months, the company's objective is to exit the Observation Period with a 'Continuation Plan'."
Things seem to be looking good on the radar."

This is good news for those of us who like all the work that Mandrake has put into making Free software easy to install.

Video Capturing Part 2 at Ars Technica miskatonic alumnus writes "Recently, slashdot reported on an excellent article -- Part I: Video Capture -- of the 3-part series 'Guide to Capturing, Cleaning & Compressing Video' at Ars Technica. At last, Part II: Video Cleaning is now available."

The largest gathering, of a sort. Linda Denison links to these "several articles about GenCon, handily linked to one place!"

From the article: 'GenCon: Freaks & Geeks,' she excerpts: 'My wife wrinkled her nose in response. Computer geeks tend to be clean. They wear clean clothes, and bathe regularly. Usually this is because they live in their mother's house. Probably in their old room. Tabletop geeks tend to wear the same clothes they bought in their early twenties, roughly three belt sizes ago, and aren't well versed in the bathing arts. This is because they live in their mother's basement. The heat sort of exacerbated this problem.'

(We've run a couple of articles originating at this year's GenCon already.)

Sci-Fi Auction Followup... cjustus writes "The live auction mentioned earlier in the week is over... Here are the prices that items went for. The big item? Original George Reeves Superman Costume for $110K ... Harrison Ford's pistol from Blade Runner went for $17K... Any slashdotters bid / win?"

Matching hardware to actual needs is not crazytalk. Michael C. Barnes writes with a followup to the recent mention of his company's low-power MicroServer, which, it turns out, has a larger sibling. "One of the people reading your post did a review of the Microserver HP. ... The person doing the review benchmarked our Microserver High Performance and thought it did a reasonably good job with My SQL."

"Penguin dip" is just an expression. Bill Kendrick writes "This Saturday, August 9th (after the Linux World Expo) San Francisco Bay Area Linux lovers and the people who love them will be gathering at the Baylands Park in Sunnyvale for Picn*x12, the third annual Linux anniversary picnic. Organized by several local LUGs and sponsored by Oracle, this barbecue is a free event for the entire family."

Whether or not you can get to the picnic, FeeDBaCK writes "It has been almost 2 years since the Linux Counter has been mentioned on Slashdot. It was last mentioned in October of 2001 and brought on an impressive number of registrations. Accounts are deleted after 2 years of inactivity, so now is a good time for everyone to freshen up their account, or create a new one if they don't have one already."

This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Slashback: Picnic, Pistol, Doggedness

Comments Filter:
  • Heh! (Score:1, Funny)

    by Anonymous Coward
    MenuetOS looks like some weird screwy version of BeOS! (I have a fetish for this kind of OS.)
  • OmG (Score:4, Funny)

    by sekzscripting (687192) on Thursday August 07, 2003 @08:06PM (#6640868) Homepage
    O.M.G.

    Free Food?!!111

    • Free Food (Score:5, Funny)

      by Gherald (682277) on Thursday August 07, 2003 @08:23PM (#6640974) Journal
      Free Food?!!111

      Yes, it is true. You can distribute it to whoever you want in both Original and Digested form, and are allowed to charge a modest distribution fee for this service.

      However, if you choose to distribute the food in Digested form, you must also make the Original availeable to the public.
      • If you take somebody else food and combine it with food of your own you could get a nasty case of gastro.
      • Given the viral nature of Free Food (i.e. "You are what you eat"), the consumption of this food could result in you being required to give Free Food to every person you meet (since physical proximity to another person could be interpreted as a "distribution"). I would therefore advise against the widespread commercial adoption of Free Food.
      • Yes, it is true. You can distribute it to whoever you want in both Original and Digested form, and are allowed to charge a modest distribution fee for this service.

        Not so fast. KFC has claimed that one of their secret herbs and spices was used in the preparation of the food at this picnic, and so you will need to pay their family meal price for every plate that you eat. They won't tell you which spice it is, so the picnic organizers can't change their recipes, but they have mentioned owning "pepper" and
    • Please RSVP [linuxpicnic.org] if you can attend so we can estimate the amount of food needed.
    • Let me guess, you are a pink squid-man? ;-)
    • Its free as in beer not free as in speech ... erm ... or ... speech not beer ... or ...

      I confused myself.
  • by General Sherman (614373) on Thursday August 07, 2003 @08:07PM (#6640877) Journal
    The Menuet OS sounds interesting. I'm wondering however if it will ever grow into a fully fledged OS written entirely in assembly. If it does, well, zoom. That'll be one of the fastest OS's on the market easily.
    • I agree, it sounds very interesting. It could do to OS's what early versions of Opera did for web browsing. However, with my limited computer knowledge, doesn't writing in assembler require a lot of knowledge about the computers underlying hardware? Would developers need to write in assembler as well, just to develop for it?

      anyway, sounds like a project worth following. but it might just be my youthful idealism.
      • you wouldn't need to write in assembly to develope for it. though the compilers for other languages would have to be written in assembly language at first.
        • You can bootstrap the compiler on another system that already has a running compiler. You then cross-compile the compiler to the target system. If the only difference between systems is the operating system, you can just port the startup code and libraries to the target system.
      • by AKAImBatman (238306) <akaimbatman@gmai[ ]om ['l.c' in gap]> on Thursday August 07, 2003 @08:38PM (#6641068) Homepage Journal
        doesn't writing in assembler require a lot of knowledge about the computers underlying hardware?

        Yes. Assembler is about as low level programming you can get without writing the hex code yourself. However, you still need to understand all the ops of a CPU and hardware interfaces when developing an OS, so it really isn't a big deal. (i.e. If you don't know what the LGDT instruction does, you won't be writing an OS any time soon.)

        Would developers need to write in assembler as well, just to develop for it?

        Nope. It's the job of a compiler to reduce the code into machine language. (Assembly is just a textual representation of machine language.) It's the job of a linker to produce binary "wrapper" files for machine code that tells the OS how to link the file in memory. Go look up the ELF (Executable and Linking Format) for a good example.

        BTW, a tip for you. You can order bound manuals for the Pentium I/II/III/4 directly from Intel's website AT NO COST. Apparently, this is a result of their deal with the justice department to resolve possible anti-trust charges. They take a month or two to get, but they are nice manuals with plenty of detail.

        • by ZxCv (6138) *
          BTW, a tip for you. You can order bound manuals for the Pentium I/II/III/4 directly from Intel's website AT NO COST.

          Gotta pointer to specifically where on their site to get them? Thanks!

        • Is there a link to the intel page where you can order these?
        • BTW, a tip for you. You can order bound manuals for the Pentium I/II/III/4 directly from Intel's website AT NO COST. Apparently, this is a result of their deal with the justice department to resolve possible anti-trust charges. They take a month or two to get, but they are nice manuals with plenty of detail.
          What did they use to cost? But anyway, you can also go to the Motorola website and get free manuals shipped to you for the PPC.
        • Manuals are here... (Score:5, Informative)

          by ashitaka (27544) on Thursday August 07, 2003 @09:18PM (#6641245) Homepage
          Oh god, I'm SUCH a karma whore...

          Pentium manuals in download or dead-tree form. [intel.com]
          • Thanks, whore.

            I will now have 4 more books in my library.
            • While both you and I are appreciative, I'm sure Intel is cursing his name right about now. While only 2 people have posted about ordering them, I think it'd be rather amusing to see a graph of requests for the past month so we could see a nice little spike in requests thanks to Slashdot. And they thought it sucked when their servers get Slashdotted. :)
              • Well, gee, it's not like their hard to find on Intel's site or anything. I just searched on "Pentium Manual" and found Intel has tons of free developer resources.

                The more free stuff you give to developers, the more developers develop for your hardware. The more developers developing for your hardware, the more people using your product.

                Developers, developers!, DEVELOPERS!!!

                Someone stop me before I start bouncing around the room!!
          • Wow, this is awesome. I've been looking for something similar to this, and the fact that I can get it for free makes it all the better. I have no modpoints to shower you with, so a sincere thank you will have to do. :)
          • Oh god, I'm SUCH a karma whore...

            Pentium manuals in download or dead-tree form. [intel.com]

            I had printed out the PDFs a while back (at work, thankfully, not at home) and had them bound, but the binder fscked up...the larger volumes were split into two or three parts, and I think one of them was bound on the wrong edge. Now I can get properly-bound editions for free...w00t!

        • BTW, a tip for you. You can order bound manuals for the Pentium I/II/III/4 directly from Intel's website AT NO COST. Apparently, this is a result of their deal with the justice department to resolve possible anti-trust charges. They take a month or two to get, but they are nice manuals with plenty of detail.

          PUUHHleeasse. Why bother with Intel when AMD [amd.com] offers the same deal? Quit obscuring the truth!!! Surely any company who can deliver a superior, [anandtech.com] innovative, [intelligent-video.com] reliable [anandtech.com] product has something to hide! [zdnet.com]

          I

          • Um. Sure. Not that AMD sees they have to compete with Intel or anything, right? Nor that 90% of their chips are (quite literally) cheap Intel knockoffs? Although, they are cheap in a good way...

            Geez, you try to help a guy out and all of Slashdot attacks. Remind me to stay home next time.

            • Maybe he didn't realize that Intel, AMD, and VIA chips all use IA-32? And not all of Slashdot is attacking you. Hell, about now, you're my hero. :)
            • I wasn't trying to kick you. It was supposed to be more of a goof then anything. I was hoping people would realize that AMD was nothing more then a knockoff and quietly subverting the masses to the prowess of Intel. Their innovations are truly captivating whereas AMD gives best bang/buck. I realize it's all ia32 arch so I guess it was kind of stupid of me to post that. It is interesting AMD is offering a book on their new AMD Athlon XP 64.

              In summary, it was quiet subversion and a chance to double the
          • While I was happy being able to get my hands on IA-32 manuals for free, the fact that I can also get x86-64 manuals has made my night indeed. Thanks. :)
        • BTW, a tip for you. You can order bound manuals for the Pentium I/II/III/4 directly from Intel's website AT NO COST. Apparently, this is a result of their deal with the justice department to resolve possible anti-trust charges. They take a month or two to get, but they are nice manuals with plenty of detail.

          That is a very cool and good piece of information to know that I didn't know. I just ordered my manuals a few minutes ago. Thanks for the info!
    • by sproket (568591) on Thursday August 07, 2003 @09:07PM (#6641197)
      Not necessarily. Everybody assumes that assembly makes the fastest programs. The reality is that optimizing C compilers can produce faster code than most programmers. Even among those who have knowledge to write faster assembly, the sheer time involved can make it unworthwhile to do something optimally. After writing something at a snail's pace for days, the developer often says to himself: I'll come back later and code this up as a binary tree, for now I'm just going to use a linear search and get it done.
      • by Stormie (708) on Thursday August 07, 2003 @10:00PM (#6641502) Homepage

        The reality is that optimizing C compilers can produce faster code than most programmers

        Yes, but "most programmers" don't sit down to write an OS in assembly. Optimizing C compilers most certainly do not produce faster code than a true kick-ass assembly guru, and I assume that's the sort of person who would take on a project like this.

        After writing something at a snail's pace for days, the developer often says to himself: I'll come back later and code this up as a binary tree, for now I'm just going to use a linear search and get it done.

        On that front, however, you may well be correct. Writing something in "100% asm" is almost certainly more about ego than performance. One adage which actually is true is the old "10% of the code takes 90% of the CPU time" one, so write it, profile it, and then rewrite the critical bits in assembly.

        • Well, yeah, an assembly guru can write kick-ass optimized code for a specific CPU - but that's why assembly sucks.

          You can hand-tune your assembly to be the fastest possible on the i586 with it's 32 K of icache and 32 K of dcache (iirc), but what will you do when you want to run it on a i686 or Athlon with different instruction timings, different cache architectures, and different bus and memory speeds? Suddenly your hand-tuned assembly isn't so optimal anymore. You have to get out a whole other set of CP
        • And if you're especially masochistic...

          Authoring Windows Applications In Assembly Language [grc.com]
    • That'll be one of the fastest OS's on the market easily.

      I doubt that hand-coded assembly is going to be noticably different from compiler generated assembly. Compilers these day do a pretty good job of optimizing.

      But yes, compared to Winbloat, it will most probably zoom!
    • I've tried Menuet in the past. The only thing that would keep it from being great is that every program can access all the memory available to the system. This means one bad app can crash the system (Win3.1 anyone?). Maybe that has changed in recent months though.
    • I for one will welcome our assembly-optimized overlords!
    • Writing stuff in assembly is extremely overrated.

      Many optimizations that compilers can do, like inlining, software pipelining, and loop unrolling are often difficult to do by hand, and at best result in assembly code that is a nightmare to maintain. (Before you jump up and tell me that macro assemblers make inlining easy, well, it's not true. They make cut-and-paste easy, but to really do inlining you need to optimize the pasted code in its new context, which means register-allocating the surrounding regio
  • by Anonymous Coward
    Well I've never heard geeks classified in such a manner. Maybe this could be a major breakthrough! Do I smell the kingdom geekus coming or is that just another tabletopgamerasourous?
  • by Telex4 (265980) on Thursday August 07, 2003 @08:09PM (#6640893) Homepage
    That's good news about Mandrake, and it's good to see that some of their financial success is coming from community support (i.e. the club). It'd be interesting to get a breakdown of figures to see how much they rely on it.

    Mandrake have put so much back into the community that it'd be fitting for the community to then help keep them afloat. It'd be a short-term disaster if they went under.
    • [peeve mode on]
      I submitted this story the other day, no other than infoworld has it that mandrake's enterprise edition beats redhats, suses and turbolinux' [infoworld.com] enterprise editons.

      Didn't get placed. Is it just me who thinks that mandrake only is news for the slashdot editors when they have financial reports, or when the words mandrake and bankrupcy are found in the same sentence?

      I bet Mandrake is still the number one distribution measured in both install base and ease of use. It certainly has been number

  • Linux Counter. (Score:3, Interesting)

    by eddy (18759) on Thursday August 07, 2003 @08:10PM (#6640896) Homepage Journal

    I'm #85934. I think I saw that Slackware reminder to register a thousand times (certainly three different installs) until I finally gave in and registered.

    Too bad, for some weird reason I really wonder how low a # I'd gotten if I'd registered ASAP

    Oh, well. At least I got #24 of 1283 in the 2.4 kernel pool [tummy.com]. But I truly digress

  • by James A. A. Joyce (681634) on Thursday August 07, 2003 @08:11PM (#6640900) Journal
    I notice that like a lot of assembler OSes it doesn't seem too modular. (That's fine, though, considering that it's just 70K!) All the utilities which are needed are builtin. Which brings me to the question I wish to ask for any who are more informed than I?

    Is there a simple way of interfacing with the GUI to produce dialog boxes and the like from a simple shell? I'm thinking of something like xdialog or gdialog in UNIX/Linux systems with X/GNOME installed.
  • by Thornae (53316) on Thursday August 07, 2003 @08:13PM (#6640912)
    The reserve price of US$40K on a complete TOS uniform for Scotty [ebay.com] wasn't met.

    Anyone got any obvious jokes about the fact that it's a RED uniform?
  • Nice advert (Score:3, Funny)

    by Faust7 (314817) on Thursday August 07, 2003 @08:17PM (#6640935) Homepage
    "Menuet, the 100 % assembly OS,

    As opposed to those languages that aren't assembly in some form... :-)
  • Video Capture (Score:5, Interesting)

    by flacco (324089) on Thursday August 07, 2003 @08:18PM (#6640941)
    I'd love to see a start-to-finish Video Capture and Clean-up article for LINUX.

    I have an ATI Radeon 8500 All-In-Wonder rotting away in my machine, and some Hi-8 tapes that I'd like to digitize... :-(

    • Re:Video Capture (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Gherald (682277) on Thursday August 07, 2003 @08:37PM (#6641058) Journal
      Indeed, as soon as I come across a good HOWTO article I will buy a Winfast TV2000XP [newegg.com]

      Unless you are building a mini HTPC type system, I think AIW is pointless. Much better to have a vanilla AGP card that can be upgraded at any time.
      • Why that card?

        The KWORLD TV787RF-Pro I bought is $40 at newegg, comes with a remote (can't say if it works with LIRC yet) tunes in FM, and I know from experience that it completely ignores Macrovision (That's right, you can actually make legal copies with decent quality now, try not to hyperventilate as you realize your rights).

        I think AIW is pointless.

        That is putting it very nicely... See my reply to the parent.
      • AIW is useless anyway. If you want to record video it's much better to go with an mpeg2 capable card.

        AIW relies way too much on CPU power; which means you can readily drop frames if you actually use it for anything while it's working. Useless.
    • I have a Matrox Marvel G200 which captures in Motion JPEG (avi) format using "lavrec", part of the "MJPEG tools" suite. Also included are filtering and deinterlacing tools and a good tutorial. Filtering speed is a little faster than 1 frame per second (720X480) and MPEG creation is about the same rate (500MHz PIII). If there is an adequate driver for your All-In-Wonder you ought to be able to use the MJPEG-tools. Reading the source code is educational.
    • Buy a firewire card. Borrow a DV camcorder that supports capturing video from an analog input. Then connect the analog out from your Hi8 to the analog input of the DV cam. Record the signal from the Hi8 cam onto the DV tape. Then output the captured DV footage via firewire.

      This may seem like it would take more time than it would to directly capture the video via the AIW, but having experienced all the hassles of analog capture via an AIW--dropped frames, and a myriad of other problems--this has worked ou
      • actually, i've been thinking about getting a dvc, but have no idea which one to buy... any recommendations for one that works well with linux? or comprehensive buyer's guides?
    • I have an ATI Radeon 8500 All-In-Wonder rotting away in my machine

      As do I.

      Tell me... What's it feel like to know you spent hundreds of dollars on a card that can't do TV-out under anything but Windows, and getting Linux TV-in with sound to work requires the sacrifice of a virgin to the computer gods.

      Oh yeah, that whole processor off-loading of video processing... forget about it.

      Man am I glad I spent a load of money on a card that has such great support... Hell, aeven under Windows their software suc

      • ... and getting Linux TV-in with sound to work requires the sacrifice of a virgin to the computer gods.

        You idiot. Have sex with the virgin first, then sacrifice her to the gods.
    • apt-get install cinepaint dv-utils kino transcode vcr

      Cinelerra [heroinewarrior.com]
      Video Capture and Editing under Linux [nmt.edu]
      Consumer Video Editing in Linux [camcorderinfo.com]
      Linux Tutorial: Video, DVD, TV and Multimedia [yolinux.com]

      Now let's all repeat after me...
      Google is my friend [google.com].

      Seriously, are you people just to lazy to type 3 frickin words into Google?
  • by mao che minh (611166) * on Thursday August 07, 2003 @08:22PM (#6640968) Journal
    My buddy lost his nice tech job at a bank and has been running the PC upgrade and repair shop at the local CompUSA (for about 50% the pay, but hell, beats unemployment). Anyways, sales of Mandrake Linux constently beat Red Hat right up until Red Hat 8 was shipped. And all together Suse, Red Hat, and Mandrake has actually sold more then Windows XP since XP's release. Only the Windows XP upgrade and Office XP has sold more copies then the Big 3 of Linux.

    I thought you might find that interesting.

    • And all together Suse, Red Hat, and Mandrake has actually sold more then Windows XP since XP's release.

      Might that have something to do with the fact that around 90% of PCs ship with WinXP pre-installed?

      • What it does mean through is that Linux "Sales" in his store are higher than Windows Sales.

        If you went to a number of other stores you might get the same data as well.

        Pool all that data together and you realise that Linux has more sales the XP since the upgrades don't count since they are going from one windows to another.

        When you look at this it's obvious that the facts are wrong but this is what microsoft does. Here's some of the tricks that are used to manipulate the stats.

        *Sell copies of Windows XP
        • I think your conclusions are incorrect. While on face value it may seem like Linux is outselling Windows, we all know that isn't true. A large portion of the Windows sales may be bundled versions with computers.

          Upgrade CDs do count. Some of the people buying Redhat 8, probably bought Redhat 7 as well. In fact, I would suggest that a large portion of those Linux buyers are repeat customers. Let's face it - if you can't afford the download for one major release, you're probably in the same boat the next t
    • by The Munger (695154) on Thursday August 07, 2003 @08:59PM (#6641169) Homepage
      Surely the fact that most PCs come bundled with a Windows OS would influence those numbers greatly. Not many 'real people' upgrade their version of windows unless they're buying a new computer or a geek friend upgrades it for them to run the latest whiz-bang software. And that geek isn't going to fork out for it.

      It's telling that the XP upgrade CD outsells the Big 3. It shows that Windows is still the OS that these 'real people' want on their machines.

      It is good to see people willing to fork out the cash to support the cause though.
    • all together Suse, Red Hat, and Mandrake has actually sold more then Windows XP since XP's release.

      Careful... Corporate America may be listening...

      Microsoft: Today we have decided to join the RIAA in their fight against Piracy. Clearly, the fact that Linux has sold more than Windows XP is incontrovertable proof that rampant Piracy is going on.
  • video capture (Score:1, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward
    To see how the pros do it check out the products from Digital Rapids.

    http://www.digital-rapids.com

    here is a link to their video processing, all hardware pre-processing with amazing results in real-time.

    http://www.digital-rapids.com/Products_DemoRoom. ht ml

    We are using some of these boards for our digital dailies at the post house and they are amazing, sadly enough however, no linux drivers yet.
  • That Bladerunner would be my second choice, any auction going on Sean Young's haircut??

    What's it called? Parting of the Waves?

  • by didjit (34494) on Thursday August 07, 2003 @09:05PM (#6641186) Homepage
    That picnic could be a good place for SCO lawyers to deliver legal papers to violators of their copyright. Anyone in attendance running Linux, wearing a Linux related T-Shirt, etc could get sued.
    • Anyone in attendance running Linux, wearing a Linux related T-Shirt, etc could get sued.

      Yeah, but just imagine what would happen to any SCO lawyer that shows up.

      I'd rather get sued. It would be far less unpleasant.

      -
  • Linux Counter (Score:1, Insightful)

    by Cpl Laque (512294)
    Not to be mister negative but...
    Being that slashdot is pro-Linux. You think the editors would have been nice enough to give Linux counter its own Article instead of being buried in a slashback. The Counter wasn't even mentioned on the main page.
  • by ikluft (1284) <ik-slash.thunder@sbay@org> on Thursday August 07, 2003 @09:34PM (#6641325) Homepage
    If you'll be at the Linux Picnic, please RSVP [linuxpicnic.org] so that we can estimate how much food to bring.

    As the posting says, there is no fee to attend. The costs of this year's picnic have been picked up by Oracle.

    And a bit of trivia: the Sunnyvale Baylands Park where the picnic is held is also one of the sites where filming took place for Revolution OS [revolution-os.com]. For anyone who's interested, we can show you the boardwalk area where the interviews with Michael Tiemann of Cygnus (now CTO of RedHat) took place.

  • George Reeves???

    His name was Christopher last I looked...

    Q.

  • Buymusic.com (Score:3, Interesting)

    by teamhasnoi (554944) * <teamhasnoi@@@yahoo...com> on Thursday August 07, 2003 @10:29PM (#6641672) Homepage Journal
    For those who responded to this post [slashdot.org], I will be getting a box full of CDs this weekend and will start sending them out - thanks to all who emailed me about getting a CD, the response was fantastic!

    In other news, we are talking with a lawyer and hope to have some news soon about our status on buymusic.com.

    After some homework, we did *not* sign anything with 'The Orchard'. We had our CDs manufactured by a company called 'Oasis' [oasiscd.com], and agreed for a song to be put on a sampler. That's it.

    'The Orchard' and buymusic.com are blatantly violating copyright in the worst way (selling the infrigements).

    Personally, I don't care if this CD is on p2p (I plan to make files available after this is taken care of), but when someone charges for these songs without our knowledge and pockets the proceeds, that is not cool.

    Thanks again for all those who emailed for a CD and to chat about it, many more are available, so feel free to contact me and buy one ($5+shipping) if you like the samples. [amazon.com]

    • I'm curious, I don't really know all the details so bare with me here. Did they actually sell any copies of your CD and make money off of it? Or was it just offered up? If they did make money off of it, are you going to be getting any money out of them? Perhaps you should sue them for 90 billion just like the RIAA ;)

      • I don't know if buymusic did; I know some others did.

        I don't know if they are liable for any $$$ as of yet, but if they are I'd love to see the RIAA put up a paypal donation link after we drain their life savings. ;)

        Of course, I won't be posting here anymore because I'll be on an island in the South Seas drinking rum.

        We'll see... :)

  • nobody told me that they were gonna wash them... :(
  • Why does anyone care what's happening on BuyMusic.com, since you can't even get into it on Linux. (Or any Apple OS, or even on Windows, unless you're using IE 5.0+). I haven't been back since I found that out on my 1st visit--using Mozilla.
    • Why does anyone care what's happening on BuyMusic.com, since you can't even get into it on Linux.

      (1) This may astonish you, but a large percentage of Slashdot's readership doesn't use Linux on a daily basis. And many of those who do still have access to Windows and Internet Explorer.

      (2) This Slashback about BuyMusic began as a copyright issue, with the store acquiring lots of artists' music from a third party without ever compensating the original artists, or even checking to see if they had permission
      • While I understand that, and I understand that BuyMusic is infringing copyright left and right (pun intended), my point is that this is just one issue with the site/company.
        It's obvious that the company doesn't care about the users or the artists, but only about making money.
        I actually emailed support when I found that you couldn't get on the site without IE 5 + (on windows) and have yet to hear from them (3 or more weeks later).
  • Indian: Thats crazytalk
    Lisa S.: No, it's true.
    Indian: No, thats my brother, Crazy Talk.
  • I'm confused... "It seems they had kept me in their catalog on a contract clause that had been overlooked when the contract was signed back in 1999." Overlooked by who, you or them? I interpret this as meaning that you were under contract with them but didn't know it, so they did have the right to sell your music, but then they graciously terminated the contract when you asked them to. Is this right?

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