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Music Media Data Storage Hardware

Return of the Vinyl Album 490

Posted by kdawson
from the vinylly dept.
bulled writes "NPR ran a story this morning about the comeback of vinyl. It seems that sales of new vinyl records are up about 10%; sales will approach a million this year (as against half a billion for CDs). NPR mentioned the popularity of a turntable with a USB interface — they didn't specify the brand; could be this one, or this — and speculated on other possible reasons for the resurgence. They mentioned sound quality and lack of DRM as possible causes. Sound quality can and will be debated, but DRM rates a resounding 'Duh.'"
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Return of the Vinyl Album

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  • Not surprising. (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Chouonsoku (1009817) on Monday April 16, 2007 @08:36PM (#18760323) Homepage
    From a collector's stand point, vinyls never really faded from popularity. I still have all of my old vinyls and purchase new ones today by more current bands.
    • Re:Not surprising. (Score:4, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward on Monday April 16, 2007 @08:40PM (#18760365)
      Exactly. Vinyl went underground with the advent of the CD, but otherwise, it hasn't gone anywhere. It still has its niche, and it always will.
    • by goombah99 (560566) on Monday April 16, 2007 @08:49PM (#18760543)

      From a collector's stand point, vinyls never really faded from popularity. I still have all of my old vinyls and purchase new ones today by more current bands.
      That's so last year. I'm going to digital Vinyl, I take my Vinyl records, convert them to MP3 then send this out over a modem which I then record as analog audio on the vinyl record. This way I don't encounter the dynamic range limitations of the vinyl.
      • Digital Vinyl (Score:5, Interesting)

        by goombah99 (560566) on Monday April 16, 2007 @09:00PM (#18760715)

        I'm going to digital Vinyl, I take my Vinyl records, convert them to MP3 then send this out over a modem which I then record as analog audio on the vinyl record. This way I don't encounter the dynamic range limitations of the vinyl.

        While you may think I'm joking I note that a 30-40Kb/sec stream is more than suficient to store audio at near CD quality in real time. You can send 30-40Kb/sec over a telephone which has a small fraction of the bandwidth of a record. Thus I can actually encode about 8 simultaneous stereo streams

        since audio records last about 40 minutes, 8 streams gives me 320 minutes of near CD quality music which is longer than an audio encoded CD can provide. Next up VCD on Vinyl

        • by Anonymous Coward
          switch from MP3 to WMA so you can add DRM and I might be interested. But I'll have to wait for the Zune version so I can squirt my Vinyl. Chicks dig me.
        • Re:Digital Vinyl (Score:4, Interesting)

          by AJWM (19027) on Monday April 16, 2007 @10:53PM (#18762119) Homepage
          Next up VCD on Vinyl

          Oh, that's been done [wikipedia.org] twenty five years ago.
          • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

            by AJWM (19027)
            twenty five years ago.

            Actually, make that eighty [wikipedia.org].

            (Okay, that's arguably analog rather than digital.)
    • by Anonymous Coward on Monday April 16, 2007 @09:04PM (#18760795)
      There's another reason that no one has mentioned yet. More space for cover art.
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Wansu (846)

      From a collector's stand point, vinyls never really faded from popularity. I still have all of my old vinyls ...

      I wouldn't exactly call myself a collector but my collection started back in the 60's when that's all there was and I bought most of them in the 70's. Some of that stuff will never be released on CD. For example, I'm a Commander Cody fan. His Country Casanova album was only released on vinyl. There are tracks on that album which appear nowhere else. So I keep my turntable.
      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by DerekLyons (302214)

        From a collector's stand point, vinyls never really faded from popularity. I still have all of my old vinyls ...

        I wouldn't exactly call myself a collector but my collection started back in the 60's when that's all there was and I bought most of them in the 70's. Some of that stuff will never be released on CD. For example, I'm a Commander Cody fan. His Country Casanova album was only released on vinyl.

        I take it you haven't actually looked [wikipedia.org] much [amazon.com] then [google.com]?

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by zakezuke (229119)
        There are tracks on that album which appear nowhere else. So I keep my turntable.

        My only complants about turn-tables and vinyl

        1) gotta replace the stylus from time to time. This is a $20 item
        2) If not a dirct drive, you gotta replace the belts. You can get away with boiling the belt once or twice to shrink it. This is a $20.00 item.
        3) You gotta pay attention to important things like ground straps so you don't pick up that 60 cycle hum on your cartridge.
        4) Since most units don't offer line level outs, yo
  • Flashback (Score:5, Insightful)

    by FatAlb3rt (533682) on Monday April 16, 2007 @08:36PM (#18760325) Homepage
    Didn't vinyl make a comeback about 12 or 15 years ago during the grunge era? What makes anyone think this is anything other than another small bump in popularity?
    • Re:Flashback (Score:4, Insightful)

      by battery111 (620778) * <battery111.gmail@com> on Monday April 16, 2007 @08:43PM (#18760437)
      vinyl is also the de-facto standard for DJ's at parties and clubs. CD equivalents that allow you to mix and scratch are somewhat frowned upon in these areas, and while the rave scene has lost most of it's popularity, there are still quite a few fans out there of this type of entertainment. I don't think that anyone's arguing that vinyl is going to overtake CDs or other digital formats in popularity, merely acknowledging that the format is still thriving, and shows no signs of disappearing any time soon.
      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by garry danger (1087361)
        its not just the "rave" scene that like vinyl. any type of dance music (techno, house, breaks) will generally be released on 12" due to the fact that dj's just love playing on proper turntables.

        although that said, you will see all the big name dj's using the pioneer cdj-1000 which work on cd's and not vinyl. it is the industry standard as you can play a burnt cd just like a record (even scratching). There are websites out there that will convert the vinyl record to digital and let you buy the mp3 as drm
      • Re:Flashback (Score:5, Insightful)

        by adelord (816991) on Monday April 16, 2007 @09:29PM (#18761163)

        vinyl is also the de-facto standard for DJ's at parties and clubs. CD equivalents that allow you to mix and scratch are somewhat frowned upon in these areas, and while the rave scene has lost most of it's popularity, there are still quite a few fans out there of this type of entertainment. I don't think that anyone's arguing that vinyl is going to overtake CDs or other digital formats in popularity, merely acknowledging that the format is still thriving, and shows no signs of disappearing any time soon.
        Vinyl was the standard, but isn't anymore. Today artists like Richie Hawtin and Sasha use Ableton Live http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ableton_Live [wikipedia.org] to produce a dynamic set that is impossible to trainspot. Wikipedia has a list of users: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Ableton_Live _users [wikipedia.org]

        Others like Mark Farina use cds. Final Scratch http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Final_Scratch [wikipedia.org] is still in use as well.

        Judging by what was seen at the winter music conference this year, th stand set-up is four decks- two for cds and two for vinyl. Five years ago vinyl was the standard, but times are still changing.

        Vinyl is still in common use, esp. for local or regional artists, but of the people I know who actually make their living off of playing music none use vinyl exclusively anymore.
    • It also "made a comeback" in 2000 or so when lots of indie bands started copying the older indie bands who had released both on vinyl and CD (e.g. Death Cab). Vinyl became an indie scene "gold card." It had as much to do with nostalgia as it did with any particular technical reason (vinyl also has the benefit of wearing out and making you have to re-purchase albums periodically).
      • by servoled (174239)
        Underground bands have pretty much always released stuff on vinyl... mostly 7" singles. It just so happens that some of those bands actually wound up with a large fan base so lots of their fans ended up buying their old vinyl releases to complete the collection.

        I'm not sure why vinyl is popular with underground bands, but I'd have to guess its an economic decision more than a "hipness" decision.
        • Well certainly part of it is that smaller labels (which charge less) are still able to put out vinyl records inexpensively. However, CD pressing is also quite affordable, so the difference is largely based on pragmatics more so than economics directly. It may well be, however, that releasing EPs is easier and more guilt-free than releasing a 35-minute album on CD. I really can't imagine anyone balking at the price of a low-run CD release from the CD-equivalent of a print shop and running to a vinyl repro
  • by Anonymous Coward
    It just happens to be hip to own vinyl again, mainly due to "audiophile" acts like the White Stripes and Modest Mouse, and other hipster indie rockers wannabes.

    This too shall pass.
  • USB? (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday April 16, 2007 @08:39PM (#18760353)
    record player with USB? doesn't that defeat the purpose of analog sound quality?
    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by setirw (854029)
      But it doesn't defeat the purpose of coolness.
    • by lawpoop (604919)
      I think it's used by musicians who want to import mixing, beat-matching, or scratching into their digital recording set-up.
    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by ozbird (127571)
      record player with USB? doesn't that defeat the purpose of analog sound quality?

      Relax - it's using a valve/tube-based ADC [electricstuff.co.uk].
      (Not really - but it's a pretty cool gadget.)
  • There's no debate. Analogue recordings are better. And they keep better too. If you make an analogue recording of something using top of the line equipment, 50 years from now, you'll be able to use superior tools to pull a more accurate representation of the sonic environment than anything we can do now. If you record digital, a bit is a bit is a bit.

    Best method, use the highest quality analogue gear you can find to record, then sample it in the highest quality digital you can for editing and distributi
    • by MightyYar (622222) on Monday April 16, 2007 @08:52PM (#18760593)
      I dispute that they "keep better". If you have an analog tape master, it will have a finite life no matter how much you pamper it. Thus the existence of techniques such as tape baking [sonicraft.com]. The only way to preserve this tape over the long-haul is to transfer it to a fresh tape or other medium sometime before it is completely degraded. Every time you transfer the analog tape, you degrade it by a generation... doing the same with a digital master would give you an exact, or near-exact copy. You could do this as many times as you wish with no generational loss.

      At the very least, you should immediately digitize the analog master so that you have the digital first-generation copy "forever".
      • by servoled (174239)
        If you have an analog tape master, it will have a finite life no matter how much you pamper it.

        The same can be said about CDs.
        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by MightyYar (622222)
          Right, but you can make a bit-perfect copy of a CD as many times as you want. A reasonable backup strategy for digital media would be to make several bit-perfect copies of the master, and then make several more bit-perfect copies of those copies at a regular interval of time. Doing this would retain the original "master" quality indefinitely, and would insulate you from format changes, as you could just backup onto whatever the prevalent format of the time is.

          This would not work at all for an analog master
    • by mr_matticus (928346) on Monday April 16, 2007 @08:52PM (#18760595)
      Persistent analog storage may be best, but consumer analog formats aren't. "Archival vinyl" is an oxymoron unless you never play the album.

      If records really want to make a comeback, they'll come up with a nondestructive way to read the disc, like a laser beam. Oops, they did that. It's called a CD.

      I agree that high quality analog recordings are a good thing to keep around for posterity, but analog recordings certainly aren't better for home reproduction (they'll get a little worse every time you play them), unless you don't mind having to repurchase albums every so often. You don't need DRM when your recording format expires and can't be reproduced easily at home. There is, after all, no "vinyl burner" on the shelf at Best Buy for $40.
      • by servoled (174239) on Monday April 16, 2007 @09:01PM (#18760731)
        Amusingly enough they did it for Vinyl as well: http://www.elpj.com/main.html [elpj.com]. Sure as hell aint cheap though.
      • by garcia (6573) on Monday April 16, 2007 @09:05PM (#18760821) Homepage
        I agree that high quality analog recordings are a good thing to keep around for posterity, but analog recordings certainly aren't better for home reproduction (they'll get a little worse every time you play them), unless you don't mind having to repurchase albums every so often.

        Oh I get it! The RIAA wants these to come back so that they can get you to download and pay for a digital copy for your portable media player and have to keep repurchasing your physical medium as well!

        This is the "new" "old" DRM. Vinyl, the gift that keeps on giving...to the RIAA.
      • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

        by ClosedSource (238333)
        "If records really want to make a comeback, they'll come up with a nondestructive way to read the disc, like a laser beam. Oops, they did that. It's called a CD."

        No, I think it's called a laser disk, since laser disks are a nondestructive analog medium.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by mudshark (19714)
      [cue rumble at -45dB]
      [cue surface noise at -38dB]
      [needle drop BANG]
      skritch...skritch...Yeah, man...POP...Iskritchgree with CLICK you totaskritchly. NothinPOPg like the skritchdelity of vinyl...skritch.

      Oh, you meant tape?

      [cue tape hiss at -60db]
      That's better. But how many machines are going to be around and serviced 50 years from now to play back that carefully stored tape? Lots of rubber idler wheels to dry out and crack, capacitors to leak, parts to become unobtainable, etc. Let's hope that someone
    • by Cordath (581672) on Monday April 16, 2007 @09:18PM (#18760993)
      A lot of vinyl-philes have this strange notion that an analogue recording is somehow capable of storing a perfectly accurate continuous waveform that is superior to digital media precisely becasue it is continuous rather than discrete. In a perfect world that might be true. In reality, it is not.

      Four basic things contribute to the fidelity of all recording formats:

      1. The tolerances of recording equipment. (e.g. How closely the signal produced by a microphone resembles the soundwave that generated that signal.)
      2. Generational loss in mastering
      3. Manufacturing tolerances that affect playback
      4. Tolerances of reproduction equipment.

      All formats are limited by #1, and #4 is in the hands of each individual end-user. (i.e. If your stereo sucks, what format you prefer won't matter much.) However, number 2 and 3 are biggies.

      Generational loss means that if you want to do anything more than slap a live recording onto a LP with no post-production whatsover, the quality will suck. Nobody masters albums in analogue these days. 99.9% of the vinyl being released was mastered digitally and then dumped back to analogue, so kiss that analogue "magic" goodbye.

      The manufacturing tolerances of LP's are also a huge issue. When was the last time you picked up a micrometer made out of vinyl? It's not exactly the most ideal material for making something that has to have hyper accurate spatial dimensions. It's easy to scratch, and has a large coefficient of thermal expansion. Just play it back at a different temperature than it was cut at and you're already pretty badly off. The tolerances of a pressed vinyl disk are also larger than you might think, and have the effect of greatly reducing the practical information capacity. (i.e. In theory, analogue recordings contain infinite infomation. If you could record a waveform with even just very very large precision in vinyl, digital media would be useless because you could pack much more data into an analogue pressing. Digital media dominates today. Guess why? The precision of vinyl sucks dingo balls.) Everything that can go wrong with vinyl will have a direct impact on the sound. The lowly CD, by comparison, has built in parity information that allow any decent CD-reader to extract bit-perfect copies that would be identical to the master.

      That being said, many CD recordings do suck, but that's the fault of mixing engineers who want to push it to 11 instead of mastering at an appropriate volume that won't clip the waveform. If a recording is mangled in this manner it's going to sound like crap no matter what you record it on.
  • Lots of good music on vinyl. I also love the hand control over the music (yes I do a little DJing here and there). But there is one thing I would love to find for fun.

    A Sony Flamingo portable record player.

    It would be pretty cool to have a standing record player (nevermind scratching with it, although that would be cool) with a translucent disc inside it playing.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Monday April 16, 2007 @08:44PM (#18760451)
    People are buying vinyl because it sounds better than digital recordings, and then using a USB turntable to make digital recordings of their vinyl records.

    What am I missing?
    • by FLEB (312391)
      The idea of having your cake, and being able to eat it in your car, too.
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      >> What am I missing?

      Main thing is that vinyl records released these days are likely to be engineered by people who actually care about the quality of the recording. This is like 99% of the difference.

      Now at least one of the digitizers claims 24 bits at 96 khz (the m-audio one). A CD is 16 bits at 44khz and a lot of stuff is lost at that rate. Plus cheap CD players have cheap digital filters so you don't get anywhere near the nyquist limit (22khz) out of them, and what you do get is out of phase in
    • by mblase (200735) on Monday April 16, 2007 @09:50PM (#18761413)
      What am I missing?

      The brick wall, with your forehead. A little more damage to your frontal lobes will do wonders for your audiophile logic.
    • Easy answer (Score:3, Insightful)

      by jd (1658)
      CDs tend not to be of very high quality, by today's standards. 16 bit isn't bad, but anyone with a good sound card can manage to digitize at 24 bits. 44.1 KHz is ok, but most quality sound cards can manage far higher rates. This doesn't make digital bad, it merely makes the digital that we're sold inferior to the digital we can make ourselves.

      (It doesn't help that some DRM/watermarking techniques for digital sound degrades the quality further than the mere absolute rates would account for.)

      Frankly, I do

  • bah (Score:2, Interesting)

    by Danzigism (881294)
    I've always liked collecting vinyl for novelty reasons.. yea of course other types of media might *sound* better, but who cares.. I can buy a jazz record that I'd have a hard time finding on iTunes or some shit if it even exists on there, for $1 at a thrift shop instead.. that is priceless.. plus you own a piece of physical history.. the sound has never mattered to me.. caring about the sound is like only saying you'll listen to bands that record with ProTools and who are Auto-Tune trigger happy.. sometimes
  • by MillionthMonkey (240664) on Monday April 16, 2007 @08:50PM (#18760561)
    Surely you don't think they're going to put the raw analog signal right in the vinyl so you can copy it! They're not about to make that mistake again. A generation of USB-enabled record players will come out that will be able to play your vinyl records from the attic, and also some goofy "new and improved" vinyl hi-def format where you drop the needle on an encryption key instead of the first track.
  • Nothing less.

    If someone could set up shop pressing 8-tracks, they'd sell too.. People collect 'em

    12" records have nice art and look good on the wall, etc.
  • by morari (1080535) on Monday April 16, 2007 @08:53PM (#18760605) Journal
    Promoting DJs. Ew.
  • by metalhed77 (250273) <andrewvcNO@SPAMgmail.com> on Monday April 16, 2007 @09:01PM (#18760745) Homepage
    What I thought was most remarkable was that this was not a technological breakthrough, we've been able to record turntables since PCs had sound cards, but that it was the packaging that caused this change. Most people simply aren't going to discover that they only need a program like Soundforge and a decent soundcard to do everything these packages do.

    All it takes is removing a couple steps to make something extremely attractive to the consumer
  • Laser Pickups (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Doc Ruby (173196) on Monday April 16, 2007 @09:16PM (#18760961) Homepage Journal
    If vinyl turntables (with USB, natch) used a laser pickup instead of a mechanical stylus, vinyl would be a lot more popular. Then records wouldn't wear out nearly as much. They could be sold used for more money with less damage. And a laser turntable could scan a record at high speed (maybe 333 1/3 RPM, 100x) for portable (lower-fi) playing on iPod, mobile phone, etc.

    Laser pickups themselves wouldn't wear out like a stylus used to, which used to put the turntable out of commission until a new one was bought. Which was sometimes expensive, especially when the electromagnetic transducer cartridge needed repair/replacement. Those were expensive, especially the really hifi ones. Today, laser pickups would be cheaper than that old precision EM stuff. And they could still be analog, like an original videodisc, with audiophiles fighting over imperceptible differences in the analog/digital converter.

    I'd get one. Vinyl sounded so much better at its best than any equivalent priced digital system I've ever heard. But then, I prefer to listen to music that was produced for vinyl's acoustic response. Kids today could get into it, too, though, if it really is a hybrid of phat old analog and cheap new digital.
  • PRM.. (Score:3, Insightful)

    by WhatAmIDoingHere (742870) * <sexwithanimals@gmail.com> on Monday April 16, 2007 @09:26PM (#18761111) Homepage
    Isn't Vinyl just Physical Rights Management? My car can play a burned CD, even one with MP3s or WMAs on it. I haven't seen a turn-table since I was like 4 (I'm only 21).
  • The obvious solution (Score:5, Interesting)

    by whitewhale (935135) on Monday April 16, 2007 @09:36PM (#18761263) Homepage

    The last two records I bought on vinyl (the new records by Of Montreal [polyvinylrecords.com] and M. Ward [mergerecords.com]) came with a coupon for one-time download of DRM-free MP3 versions of the album tracks from the label's Web sites. So I get the big cover art and the intangible experience (they're both double albums on vinyl) but I can still play 'em on the computer without sweating over the process of digitizing vinyl.

    Fact is, the vinyl version of the Of Montreal record (which is awesome) has a scratch that makes track 3 repeat the same crazy groove over and over, and it sounds intentional and much, much better than the digital version, which now seems weirdly short. And it comes with four bonus tracks, which are included in the download too but not on the CD version. Obviously some small record labels are betting big on vinyl as a way to keep people buying records, and I'm all for it.

  • by ecliptik (160746) on Monday April 16, 2007 @09:41PM (#18761319) Homepage

    At 25 I just inherited my dad's vinyl collection and I've found they make music fun again. When digital distribution of started to catch on I stopped buying CDs, but then it felt like I was just buying filenames. Even when I occasionally bought a CD, I would just rip it to MP3 and put it on my shelf never to bother with it again. Convenient yes, fun not so much.

    With vinyl all this convenience goes away. It's fun to go to the record store and sift through 1.00$ bins, or find pressings of newer groups. Then when you get home, you play it. You don't put it into your computer and hit button. You open it up, carefully take the disk out, notice the large liner notes, spin up the table and enjoy. It's more of an event than just rip. burn. play.

    Sure it's analog, and there's the occasional distortion, but with a decent cartridge and stylus it's amazing how good new vinyl sounds. Finding spare sleeves to put your favorite albums in then putting the cover them on your wall make for some good excellent wall art too. To me it's similar to why I buy books even when I can get e-books. Life it's just about making everything streamlined and perfect, sometimes you need a little analog grit to keep it interesting.

    Of course, I negated myself already by writing about ripping vinyl with 100% Free Software [blogspot.com], but that's more for getting my dads old albums onto CD for him.

  • by YGingras (605709) <ygingras@ygingras.net> on Monday April 16, 2007 @10:00PM (#18761523) Homepage
    Have you seen and heard a DJ with vinyls? I mean, a real DJ, someone who mixes. I was peacefully sipping some malt liquor at a random electro industrial bar on a slow day. It was probably in the middle of the week; I recall that we were no more than five in the place. An electro industrial bar is not a place where you expect a skillful DJ. You expect a DJ knowledgable in the latest trends with a huge collection of obscure music that he had from download^W import from Germany or something like that. Songs go one after the other and there is some effort to keep that BPM constant and to make the transition beat-into-beat. I thought that this was the essence of mixing. Then, out of nowhere, came this rave DJ. He was actually a former electro industrial DJ who was visiting his former workplace. And he made a set.

    I don't know how to describe the experience. He started a hard song on the CD player (Funker Vogt I think) then he attacked the turntable. He started with a Depeche Mode vinyls, and I hear you scream at the idea of eletro pop being mixed with Funker Vogt, but what he did was brilliant. He jumped on the EQ and isolated the good baseline so typical of Depeche Mode and gently blended it into the hard stuff, just the baseline. A moment later the vinyl was doing backflips over his head; he wanted to plug in voice sample that was on the other side. It was almost instantaneous, he waved his hand over the EQ, the voice sample played, the vinyl flipped again and we were back with the baseline. We assume that vinyls have poor seek time but, in the hand of an expert, a vinyl will seeks much faster than a CD. The DJ continued his dance, mixing in some elements of trance and goa, building an elecro industrial song out of other songs from a wide repertoire of electronic music. When he left, he was not the resident DJ after all, nothing was the same anymore.

    I had discover that mixing was in fact a form of composition but it was all gone. I now pay attention to the work of the DJ. The DJ is an artist an his medium is extremely expressive. A good DJ will keep the dancefloor full but only a greet DJ will coerce people into dehydration and renal failure. When I see a DJ lifting the dusty cover of the turntable, I know that I'm in for a good show. I keep the ear open and I enjoy this rare skill that the CD almost killed.
  • by stox (131684) on Monday April 16, 2007 @10:11PM (#18761671) Homepage
    I own well over 1,000 pieces of vinyl, and many of them sound better than the CD. This isn't because vinyl sounds better, but because either the master was damaged or poorly remastered for CD. It is amazing how poorly mastered some CD's are. Digital recording does not compensate for an idiot behind the sound board, in fact it makes it much worse.
  • Damn kids (Score:3, Interesting)

    by Daishiman (698845) on Monday April 16, 2007 @10:20PM (#18761779)

    I hate this stupid fad, and I say it as a vinyl lover an serious collector (I'm buying up over 10 records a week). These kids do this out of nonconformism, except that like most idiot wannabe nonformists, they don't know squat about anything (Disclaimer: I'm 20 years old, but I'm really an old fart in a kid's body).

    They don't know how to maintain their records, they can't differentiate between high-quality records and a digital-to-analog dump (worthless). They buy modern or popular music that you can get on CDs without the disadvantage of noise floor, they don't have decent turntables, and worst of all, lack decent stylii (a bad stylus will damage the record). I buy records mostly for Jazz that's never been mastered on CD and other such rarities, and play it on a system that's worth more than $200 bucks; really, anything less than that is simply a waste.

    And they raise the price and end up destroying the records and then you can't find anything decent because everything's scratched.

  • Sound quality. (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Tokerat (150341) on Tuesday April 17, 2007 @12:34AM (#18762965) Journal
    It's not about making the sound EXACT, it's about making the sound BETTER.

    CDs win for exact replication, but for things like club music, with lots of sharp synth sounds, bass, etc. A little "natural interference" from the actual physical motion of the vibrating stylus can make it sound "naturally artificial", or, quite to the effect such music attempts to achieve, surreal.

    Plus, spinning vinyl is a HELL of a lot of fun. CD decks, not so much.
  • by Quiet_Desperation (858215) on Tuesday April 17, 2007 @12:46AM (#18763041)
    ...Volvo will offer a 6 vinyl album in-dash changer.
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by wjsteele (255130)
      Actually, Chrysler had a record player as an option in their cars back in the Fiftys. It was called the Highway Hi-Fi. It didn't use standard records but instead used a propriatery 16 2/3 RPM 7" format (read ARM anyone - that would be Analog Rights Managment.)

      Later on, they realized that the custom format wouldn't work and opened up to the standard 45. The 1960 version could allow you to stack up to 12 records in it.

      Here is an article from Chrysler about it. http://www.uaw-daimlerchryslerntc.org/images/ [uaw-daimle...lerntc.org]

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