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The Happiest Days of Our Lives 149

Posted by Zonk
from the for-me-those-are-a-bit-more-recent dept.
If you've ever read Wil Wheaton's blog (clevernickname to us), you know he's not afraid to put everything on the table. One of the things I've always admired about his writing is his willingness to talk about his kids. On the internet. With ... people. Despite the obvious problems that could cause, Wil has been sharing anecdotes about his adventures in parenting since the early days of WWDN. His newest book, The Happiest Days of Our Lives, talks about growing up geek and what it means to be a nerd and a father at the same time. Read on for my review.
The Happiest Days of Our Lives
author Wil Wheaton
pages 136
publisher Monolith Press
rating 8/10
reviewer Zonk
ISBN 0974116017
summary Wil Wheaton's recollections of growing up, and parenting, as a nerd.


That the bones of the book's content comes directly from Wil's website shouldn't distract you. Whether you've been a reader all along (and might recognize some of these stories) or not, they've all been expanded and clarified for inclusion in the book. That clarification is something that comes across very strongly in Happiest Days, especially if you have read any of his previous work. Wil has put a great deal of work into the craft of writing over the past few years, and it shows. Some three years have passed since his sophomore effort in Just a Geek, and even more since Dancing Barefoot.

Where once it seemed as though Wil had something to prove in his writing - that he was over showbiz, that he was over Star Trek - Happiest Days is full of simple stories. The day he bought a Lando Calrissian action figure essentially by mistake, a simple outing for ice cream with his sons; they're everyday events but artfully told. In total he has about thirteen short tales in the chapbook-sized novel, ranging from just two pages long to a few dozen.

Some of his most evocative stories (and the reason this review is here) are all about Wil's growth as a nerdling. The most evocative for me was the chapter 'a portrait of the artist as a young geek', which details Wil's introduction to tabletop roleplaying. From his first brush with the infamous 'red box' D&D set at Christmas 1983, to his experience teaching his kids how to roll up characters under the 3.0 rulesset, the story reminds me (and may remind you) of a D6-laden past.

And really, that's what Wil makes this a book about. It's about his own past, his troubles, his triumphs, but in reality this is meant to be a book that reaches out to you as a reader. If you see something of yourself in the kid who agonized in the toy aisle, if you see something of yourself in the dad who argues with his kids over the radio station (and rocks out to 80s synth-pop), then the purpose of the Happiest Days has been fulfilled. Or at least, as I see it.

And, of course, if you like Wil's discussion of Star Trek there's some elements of that there as well. The difference, again, is that instead of pining for Trek itself, Wil reminisces about the impact Trek has had upon him. Great experiences talking like adults with Jonathan Frakes, the chance to speak to Ron Moore backstage at a con, and the recording of a documentary are what makes for stories from Wil in the here and now.

Probably the book's strongest element is also its biggest drawback. Wil's vicious editing and strong prose makes for an incredibly short book. The amount of story and emotion packed into the bare 136 pages is impressive. But ... it's still just 136 pages. And for $20, that seems a bit steep. For me, though, it was worth it to support an author that's been a pleasure to watch grow over the last several years. From blogger to published writer, Wil Wheaton's journey is laid out in miniature in the pages of Happiest Days. With the sour taste of Just a Geek washed out of his mouth, my hope is that we'll see more long-form work from Wheaton in the future. In the meantime this is a worthy 'sequel' to Dancing Barefoot, and well worth a look by fans of the well-placed word.

You can purchase The Happiest Days of Our Lives from Monolith Press. Slashdot welcomes readers' book reviews -- to see your own review here, read the book review guidelines, then visit the submission page.
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The Happiest Days of Our Lives

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  • Really very good (Score:4, Interesting)

    by MrAndrews (456547) * <mcm.1889@ca> on Tuesday November 20, 2007 @03:36PM (#21425961) Homepage
    This is definitely one of my favourite books of the year, if for no other reason than the simple familiarity of the writing. Reading it is like sitting in a pub with an especially expressive friend, listening to him tell you some crazy story about his past that you suspect must be embellished, but don't mind if it is. After a crazy day dealing with puffed-up psychopaths a few weeks ago, I read four chapters, and it's like the casual tone just evaporated all my tension. Wil sucks the pretension out of the air with his writing... it's just superb.

    The one thing I'm hoping for is a work of fiction next... I know it's an extra-daunting task, but I'm sure it'd kick ass.
    • by AmiNTT (539586) *
      I read the entire book in one sitting and have to say it is a great, quick read. I'll second the request to see some fiction from him. Well done, Wil.
      • by cayenne8 (626475)
        When I read the title of the article here on slashdot...I thought at first this had something to do with the Pink Floyd "The Wall" [wikipedia.org] album....
        • Wow, I thought I was the only one. And in the town it was well known when they got home at night Their fat and psychopathic wives would thrash them within inches of their lives!
          • Yes, Floyd came to mind as well. But if I hear one more story of how he slipped Ashley Judd the tongue...
            there will be some thrashings from me, too.

            • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

              by PopeRatzo (965947) *

              But if I hear one more story of how he slipped Ashley Judd the tongue...
              What, he worked in a deli, too?

              I hope he sliced it nice and lean.
        • Good, I'm not the only one who sees that title and mentally segues into "Another Brick in the Wall, Part 2", chanting, "We don't need no education!"

          Maybe I'm not crazy after all.
    • Re:Really very good (Score:5, Informative)

      by CleverNickName (129189) * <wil@wilw[ ]ton.net ['hea' in gap]> on Tuesday November 20, 2007 @04:09PM (#21426545) Homepage Journal
      The one thing I'm hoping for is a work of fiction next... I know it's an extra-daunting task, but I'm sure it'd kick ass.

      I don't know if it counts, but I did a story for the latest TOS manga from TokyoPop, and I'm currently working on a short story that I hope to release in the near future.

      (And thank you so much for your kind words about my book. I'm really happy you liked it.)
      • Re:Really very good (Score:4, Interesting)

        by MrAndrews (456547) * <mcm.1889@ca> on Tuesday November 20, 2007 @04:36PM (#21427001) Homepage
        On the off chance you're still hanging around here (rather than, say, fighting with PayPal), I had a question for you: now that you've done fiction and non-fiction, which do you find more difficult to wrap your mind around? You seem to be very much at ease with writing about your real life, but I wonder if that's just a general skill that you're applying in a specific way.

        For me, I can't write about my life without collapsing into a puddle of trembling self-doubt, but I can make stuff up about invented people without breaking a sweat. I wonder if your talent in that area stems from being an actor, and being more comfortable "putting yourself out there".

        Very much looking forward to your short story! Good luck with the 300!
        • Re:Really very good (Score:5, Interesting)

          by CleverNickName (129189) * <wil@wilw[ ]ton.net ['hea' in gap]> on Tuesday November 20, 2007 @04:53PM (#21427279) Homepage Journal
          For me, I can't write about my life without collapsing into a puddle of trembling self-doubt, but I can make stuff up about invented people without breaking a sweat. I wonder if your talent in that area stems from being an actor, and being more comfortable "putting yourself out there".

          It's the exact opposite for me, or at least it has been to this point. When I write narrative non-fiction, I know the whole story arc and all the characters, because I've experienced it all firsthand already. All I do is try my best to recreate as vividly and simply as possible what's already happened. To be honest, though, I'm starting to get bored telling stories about my own life, and if I'm getting bored with it, the audience can't be far behind (if they haven't gotten there ahead of me.) So now it's time to focus on writing fiction, which is sort of like moving from the outfield to third base for me.

          Until recently, when I've sat down to write fiction, I've gotten tremendous performance anxiety about creating something almost entirely out of whole cloth. I've felt like, "Hey, look at me! I. Am. A. Writer. I. Am. Writing. Now." (That works if you say each word out loud and make exaggerated typing motions with your hands, and use a dumb guy voice.) I'm still not entirely over that self-consciousness, but it's getting easier with each attempt. I think the key for me (at least right now -- I'm still at that point where it's easy to level up quickly) is coming up with a beginning and an ending, and using a couple of characters I care about to tie them together. The real trick is not being afraid to suck, because it's easier to fix something that sucks than it is to fill a blank page.
          • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

            by Anonymous Coward
            I've felt like, "Hey, look at me! I. Am. A. Writer. I. Am. Writing. Now."


            In my head I just hear it as William Shatner saying it, and I know exactly what you mean.

          • Re:Really very good (Score:5, Informative)

            by myth_of_sisyphus (818378) on Tuesday November 20, 2007 @05:32PM (#21427795)
            WIl, I really enjoy your writing about being a father and a geek but I especially like the reviews of STTNG episodes on TV Squad.

            http://www.tvsquad.com/bloggers/wil-wheaton/ [tvsquad.com]

            The insider references are great, but the writing itself is hilarious. Rarely have I laughed more than when reading your one-liners and non-sequiturs. When are you going to do more of those?
          • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

            by beav007 (746004)

            So now it's time to focus on writing fiction, which is sort of like moving from the outfield to third base for me.
            Nobody on Slashdot has ever moved to third base before. Maybe you should write about it...
          • by matt21811 (830841)
            Wil,
            does it annoy you that you that Zonk posted a review of your book right when it cant be purchased?
              I mean 80,000 visitors who are exactly the kind of people who would enjoy your book are getting wasted by poor timing.
          • by PhotoGuy (189467)
            This guy has a subtle wisdom, insight, and modesty, that makes me expect great things from him before long, probably along the lines of fiction writing. Another post summed it up pretty well, with the "don't hate the player, hate the game" aspect of Wesley Crusher. Wil played the character very well; the character just happened to be annoying to many (myself included).

            And I was guilty of associating the actor with the character; reading his stuff (primarly through /. links) makes me realize there's far mo
          • I have run into a similar problem, where I had a great idea for a beginning and ending but couldn't figure out how to link them. A friend of mine who writes frequently (fiction and non fiction) suggested something that helped me, so maybe you will find it useful.

            Get a close friend (or friends) who is good with listening, or one who does good role playing. Find a campfire story type setting that you both enjoy, and either tell him the story or role play it with him. (Substitute her for him as appropriate) Do
    • Wil sucks the pretension out of the air with his writing... it's just superb.

      Agreed, and the main reason I read him. Granted, the Trek/Linux topics he's interested help forge a connection for us /. geeks, but a decent writer is a decent writer.

      What I'm really waiting for is when he really decides to stretch his wings and starts writing outside his comfort zone. Any novels waiting to burst out, Will?
    • by angiek (1191927)
      I'll third the request for some fiction.

      What I have always liked about his stories is how they hit home with me, even ones that I can't completely identify with yet. (I have no kids so I can't say I know what it's like to rock out to 80s synth while they disparage my choice in music... but I will someday and will probably tell them to get off my proverbial lawn.) It's to the point where I almost tell the stories to other people like they're mine. "One time, in the late 70s, I was in KMart, and I bought a
  • Can't buy it today (Score:4, Informative)

    by stoolpigeon (454276) * <bittercode@gmail> on Tuesday November 20, 2007 @03:37PM (#21425991) Homepage Journal
    But the site says ordering will be back up by the 26th.
     
    Wil just sold through 300 signed hard cover copies and I guess the paperbacks will be available again in the next week or so.
    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      He was having issues with PayPal and had to suspend the softcover sales to get the process to work with the hardbacks. He has posted that once he gets the hardbacks shipped he will start up paperback sales again.

      I'm happy I am one of the 300!
      • by flewp (458359)

        I'm happy I am one of the 300!
        Liar. We all know none of the 300 survived the final arrow volleys.
  • I'm a 300! woohoooooooooo!
  • is what Trek he thinks is best! c'mon, throw us a frickin' bone here!
    (full disclosure - i've voted about a dozen times for TOS - not that it's helped)
  • by CptPicard (680154) on Tuesday November 20, 2007 @03:51PM (#21426251)
    Clearly, it is not possible to be a nerd and a father at the same time... the former should make the latter impossible.
    • You are almost right but wrong. Being a nerd and a father are easy to do at the same time. The problem lies in being a nerd and fathering a child at the same time.
      • by Krinsath (1048838)
        Which he sidestepped, since they're his stepkids.

        However, just from reading his site and listening to him talk, he's their father all the same. Sounds like a pretty decent one too.

        Of course, if you listened to me I'm the most diligent worker ever and Slashdot is entirely work-related, but still...
      • by CptPicard (680154)
        Yeah, the girl usually starts to get freaked out when you're trying to father a child and just HAVE TO do some kernel hacking on the side... :\
        • by markana (152984)
          Do you have any idea how *long* it takes to do a full kernel build on some low-end boxes? There's more than enough time for other activities... :-)
          • by CptPicard (680154) on Tuesday November 20, 2007 @04:19PM (#21426721)
            Yeah, but you still want to watch all the cool gcc output scrolling by as it makes you feel l33t, instead of staring into your girl's eyes, and the she is jealous that you're drooling your kernel build and getting all hard off your compiler optimization flags instead instead of her...
            • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

              by rbanffy (584143)
              I concede it's funny, but it is also a horrible thing to say.

              As a father, I can tell you that, while you may sometimes get tired of your kids (kids _are_ noisy), there are no moments as precious as those when they are around.

              Even those rare moments when you got all the config values just right and, for the first time in months your wireless work flawlessly under WPA2, cannot compare.
            • Just pipe the output of the GCC to a random Barry White song selector. You know what the compile is doing and you can put the output to a good multitask use.
            • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

              by TheRaven64 (641858)
              Put the monitor behind you. Then you can stare romantically into her eyes... and watch the reflection of the GCC output scroll by.
    • by bigdavex (155746)

      Clearly, it is not possible to be a nerd and a father at the same time... the former should make the latter impossible.

      He must have used some kind of phasing.
      • Re: (Score:1, Flamebait)

        by CptPicard (680154)
        Hmm... so you are in some sort of a superposition of nerd and father until pregnancy test result is observed?

        Can't work that way either, would have to somehow get to the point of having a possibly positive result, no?
    • by niceone (992278) *
      Clearly, it is not possible to be a nerd and a father at the same time...

      Quite possible: sperm bank + database hacking + a bit of stalking.
    • by MochaMan (30021)
      Man... the poor guy can't even get away from Picard on Slashdot!
      • by CptPicard (680154)
        Apart from the fact that Slashdot is an unlikely place to get away from Picard, I must admit that you gave me some food for thought as to why me and my favourite fictional character are single and not parents...

        We all know Picard is a non-parent geek and doesn't like children... and this is probably because when the SO came up all bothered and tried to suggest there probably should be some little ones around, the standard "make it so" probably wasn't the best possible answer... so she did, and switched male
  • by sseaman (931799) <<moc.liamg> <ta> <namaes.naes>> on Tuesday November 20, 2007 @03:59PM (#21426393) Homepage Journal

    One of the things I've always admired about his writing is his willingness to talk about his kids. On the internet. With ... people. Despite the obvious problems that could cause, ...
    Am I missing something? What's so problematic about discussing your children on the internet? Everyone with kids does it.
    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by mabinogi (74033)
      I was wondering exactly the same thing - I'm not sure why you got modded as flamebait for asking...
    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      One of the things I've always admired about his writing is his willingness to talk about his kids. On the internet. With ... people. Despite the obvious problems that could cause, ...

      Am I missing something? What's so problematic about discussing your children on the internet? Everyone with kids does it.

      Because the kids may not like that, either now or in the future. Although I do have a feeling that most parents would not want there children discussing them on the Internet. The idea that you can do something bad just because everybody else does it is a common belief, but that does not make it correct. I would rather have parents discussing how they can protect their children's privacy

      • by geekoid (135745)
        talking about does not equal Gossip.

        Parents have always talked about there kids, this just happens to be a new medium.
        DO you thinking people raise kids in a bubble? do you think parent know everything about raising kids? How do you think parent get advice from more experienced parents?
        • talking about does not equal Gossip.

          Gossip (from WordWeb):

          1 . Light informal conversation for social occasions
          2. A report (often malicious) about the behaviour of other people "the divorce caused much gossip"
          3. A person given to gossiping and divulging personal information about others

          Parents have always talked about there kids, this just happens to be a new medium.

          As I've said, popular behaviour does not make it right. (And yes BTW, I expected to be modded down for this rather unpopular statement). But sometimes things need to be said despite the popular consensus.

          DO you thinking people raise kids in a bubble? do you think parent know everything about raising kids? How do you think parent get advice from more experienced parents?

          Getting advice from people and gossiping are too differ

      • Because the kids may not like that, either now or in the future.

        So what? You must not be a parent.
        • Because the kids may not like that, either now or in the future.

          So what? You must not be a parent.

          It is irrelevant whether I am a parent or not. One thing that should be obvious though is that I was a child, and I never liked it when my parents gossiped about me. I presume that you are making this statement because you are a parent who likes to gossip about their kids, or perhaps just hear gossip from other parents. It's normal for people who engage in bad behaviour to be defensive about their own actions.

          • "Writing about" is not the same as "gossip". What makes you think it is?

            I write about my kids. Anything I write is a fair and accurate description that does not try to portray them in a poor light. If they dislike it now or later, that's their problem, not mine.

            • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

              "Writing about" is not the same as "gossip". What makes you think it is?

              The medium is besides the point. It is all verbal communication. The outcome is the same. "Gossip" does not necessarily imply malicious intent, however it can invade people's privacy.

              I write about my kids. Anything I write is a fair and accurate description that does not try to portray them in a poor light.

              It's certainly good that you do not try to portray your kids in a bad light; however a writer's intentions may not always reflect the opinions of their children. For example, a person may not think that talking about a child's bowel movements may not be malicious, but that child may not think that is "fair" or appropriate. Ta

              • Your points are not unreasonable but they sound a little close to the kinds of attitudes that are turning so many of our children into emotional cripples full of hollow self-esteem that will fall to pieces in the real world and end up living in their parents' basement until they are 40 because they don't know how to deal with competition or legitimate criticism, leave alone the kind of criticism you get in the Real World, especially in places like /.

                I don't need to get my children's permission to talk about
                • Real World

                  First things first. This is the real world. Their is no alternate bizzaro universe to go to, no matter how much television you may watch. People who use "Real World" arguments do so because they don't have any rational arguments to make.

                  Your points are not unreasonable but they sound a little close to the kinds of attitudes that are turning so many of our children into emotional cripples full of hollow self-esteem that will fall to pieces in the real world and end up living in their parents' basement until they are 40 because they don't know how to deal with competition or legitimate criticism, leave alone the kind of criticism you get in the Real World, especially in places like /.

                  Having respect for somebody does not turn somebody into an "emotional cripple" who has "hollow self-esteem". I have noticed throughout my life (that children with bad parents) will either be dumb enough to grow up to be like their parents, or smart enough to reject them. A

                  • As for wanting your children to feel a certain way based on what you consider good or bad behaviour is also bizarre and manipulative. Playing mind games with your children's feelings is wrong.

                    What mind games? What in the world are you talking about? Since when does "unconditional approval" equate to "respect". True respect to a child involves teaching right and wrong, not patting them on the head whether they are curing cancer or massacring a village.

                    I've tried to be patient with you, but this statement
                    • I will leave with one last post to this thread. You may have the last word if you like. I do disagree with many things you say, and find many of your comments inappropriate and unfair to say the least, so below I have listed my rebuttals.

                      As for wanting your children to feel a certain way based on what you consider good or bad behaviour is also bizarre and manipulative. Playing mind games with your children's feelings is wrong.

                      What mind games? What in the world are you talking about? Since when does "unconditional approval" equate to "respect". True respect to a child involves teaching right and wrong, not patting them on the head whether they are curing cancer or massacring a village.

                      Expecting to get an emotional response from a child based on a psychological for

                    • Your prejudices are likewise very obvious, and you cannot deny you reacted with great prejudice that what I had to say. You made as many or more incorrect assumptions about me as you claim I have of you, so I don't see how you can deny it.

                      I continue to believe that you have little or no real world experience, or haven't learned from it.

                      It seems having realized that I'm not the monster you first painted me as, you simply fell back on the last resort of the weak-minded: ad hominem attacks, by claiming out of
    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by gambino21 (809810)
      Probably many people are concerned about the privacy issues. Public information about your family could be used against you or your family by classmates, angry neighbors, etc. But I agree with you, and I'm not sure why you were modded down. I blog about my family, mostly for the enjoyment of my friends and relatives. I do think about what information I should or shouldn't share with the public, but in general I think if someone is out to get me for some reason, they probably aren't going to be helped th
  • by Dachannien (617929) on Tuesday November 20, 2007 @04:08PM (#21426523)

    But ... it's still just 136 pages. And for $20, that seems a bit steep.
    I agree. But it's vaguely on-topic to point out that Wizards of the Coast regularly pawns off D&D sourcebooks shorter than 136 pages for more than $20 each.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by east coast (590680)
      The D&D books are reference guides. Their value can not be figured out using the same methods as normal reading material.

      Put it this way: if you buy Wil's book how many hours will you read and reread it for? On the other hand how many hours will you spend playing D&D off a set of books?

      It's like a Tangram set I bought at Barnes and Nobles a couple years ago... it was just a couple tiles of plastic and a 120 page book that I forked the money over for, it was the hours and hours of activity that I w
      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by Lemmy Caution (8378)
        We may pay $30 or $40 for a meal that we finish in an hour and feel we've had a good deal, then pay $10 for a pen with which we will write for over a hundred hours and feel ripped off, then spend $20,000 on a wedding that lasts a day and feel it's well-spent, while thinking that is too much to spend on a car that we will use for 5 years.

        Value is not just a function of time of use.
        • Value is not just a function of time of use.

          Not always no, but you're also mixing apples and oranges. Most people feel better with a 30 dollar meal over the 5 dollar deal-o-the-day at the local taco joint. Most people feel ripped off by a 10 dollar pen because a 45 cent Bic Clic Stic does the same thing and for most people is just as nice. A wedding is a once in a lifetime kind of event. People hate to skimp on those things.

          I'd mostly file your post under bad analogy but in someways you'd be correct. Whi
        • by arth1 (260657)
          No, of course value isn't just an equation of time spent, but if we compare $fruit, a clementine costing the same as an orange is not a good value.

          When buying books, I do look at the font size, spacing and page count, and where books otherwise appear equal in genre and style, I will tend to buy a longer book over a shorter one. If a book has relatively large print, large borders, large spacing and is less than 150 pages long, it will tend to lose out when competing for my money, unless the price is much lo
    • by geekoid (135745)
      which is also horrible overpriced.
  • by $RANDOMLUSER (804576) on Tuesday November 20, 2007 @04:09PM (#21426553)
    Zonk can read?
  • Always seemed too gawky to me.
  • Having kids is great.

    Having kids who've grown up to be people you like as well as love -- that utterly rocks.

    All things considered, the fifties so far have been the best times I can remember. I'm willing to wait for grandchildren, but only in the "do not open before Xmas" sense.

  • Interesting (Score:4, Insightful)

    by orclevegam (940336) on Tuesday November 20, 2007 @04:38PM (#21427045) Journal
    I find it kind of sad to think of Wil reading through the comments on here. I'm sure as a regular to slashdot he's probably used to the trolling that goes on, but it's still got to be hard on him at some level to read some of this stuff. I for one hadn't heard about this book before now, but I think I'll go pickup a copy. It's always interesting to see a fellow geeks perspective on life, and Wil usually does a pretty good job of expressing that perspective.
    • I was wondering the same thing. On some level it has to have an effect but at the same time he's been around here a long while. He knows the /. crowd and I'm betting does a pretty good job at filtering it out from his reality. Well done on book 3 Wil. Was it harder or easier than the dreaded book 2 ...
    • I think anybody who's a regular on the Internet knows how silly and meaningless trolls are. As a regular slashdotter, I think he knows that the praise is much higher than the trolling is low. Most everything anti-Wil I've seen consists of pointless, poorly thought out sentences. But the complements are just as consistent: thoughtful appreciation of the warm, emotional relationships that are unique to his writing, yet instantly familiar to us.

    • by Weaselmancer (533834) on Tuesday November 20, 2007 @05:31PM (#21427787)

      You think a few lame-o trolls on Slashdot are going to affect him? At one point in time he had almost all of nerddom hating him. Usenet groups dedicated to his destruction. People at cons screaming at him. In Klingon. You name it.

      Wil probably has thicker skin than a rhino at this point.

      That being said - I'm a fan. Of both Wil and Wesley. Suck it, haters.

    • by sukotto (122876)
      We could amuse him with /.isms

      I, for one, welcome our new "Just an Overload"

      Picture Wil Wheaton with Natalie Portman and hot grits down his pants.

      etc.

    • Re:Interesting (Score:5, Insightful)

      by _Sprocket_ (42527) on Tuesday November 20, 2007 @05:58PM (#21428175)

      I find it kind of sad to think of Wil reading through the comments on here. I'm sure as a regular to slashdot he's probably used to the trolling that goes on, but it's still got to be hard on him at some level to read some of this stuff.
      I like to think that the guy who picked up a "Shut up, Welsey" button at a vendor booth and wore it for the duration of a Star Trek convention has figured out how to handle the bleating of Slashdot trolls. After all, not only is Wil something of a Slashdot regular - he is also responsible for one of the best meta geek posts [slashdot.org] in slashdot history. Who else would use Slashdot, and a rare public interview opportunity with a nerd culture icon, to have a pseudo-private conversation?
  • After finishing the book, Wheaton reported that his children began singing about not needing "no education" and asking him to "leave them kids alone"
  • A Great Geek Read (Score:2, Interesting)

    by Fricka (583769)
    I got my copy in the mail a few weeks ago, right before I left on a trip. When I got back I picked it up and then didn't put it down until I was done. It's a real thrill ride of a "whodunit". Ok, it's not but it IS very compelling reading.

    I enjoyed it immensely. Perhaps this was partly because I grew up in the town neighboring his so those stories had extra meaning to me. However, I think any geek will enjoy it, as someone else said in the comments, he's "one of us".

    My formal review is on my blog: http://ww [offlinetshirts.com]
  • If you were/are a fan of Star Trek: The Next Generation, go and read Wil's own TNG episode reviews at TV Squad [tvsquad.com].

    I guarantee you - you will almost die laughing.

  • D6? Oh please. (Score:2, Interesting)

    by Azari (665035)

    the story reminds me (and may remind you) of a D6-laden past

    D6?? I associate D6 with Monopoly and Steve Jackson & Ian Livingstone Fighting Fantasy [wikipedia.org] books, not D&D. I think I still have my d20 (if I can still call it that without getting permission from Hasbro ;P) from my first edition of D&D.

    ...+1 Pedantic nerd?

  • One of the things I've always admired about his writing is his willingness to talk about his kids

    Damn, and I thought I was in trouble a few years ago when K5's Rusty put me on his watch list [kuro5hin.org]. My reaction was "Holy cow! I'm on Rusty's watchlist! Now I'll never be able to get laid

    But here I am with Zonk saying this and ... look, Zonk, if you like my stuff, [kuro5hin.org] please don't tell anybody! At least... oh hell, CmdrTaco is next, I just know it =(

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