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Watchmen Movie Trailer Is Out 266

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the stuff-to-see dept.
I forgot to mention the other bit of exciting comic book movie news this week: DaSpudMan noted that the Watchmen trailer is out — from the Director of 300, which spawns mixed feelings at our office. But it looks pretty good.
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Watchmen Movie Trailer Is Out

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  • by Izabael_DaJinn (1231856) * <slashdot@nOsPAM.izabael.com> on Monday July 21, 2008 @03:54PM (#24279479) Homepage Journal
    Mixed feelings sums it up for me as well!

    I have fond memories of my first boyfriend reading me the Watchmen, and many scenes in the trailer looked like they were taken right from the comic panels so I should be excited--but I don't know...

    The Comedian didn't look like quite like the vicious rascal I had hoped he would (but I only saw him for a few seconds so we'll see.)

    Ozymandius's costume looks completely different (I miss his purple one!), and Silk Spectre's costume is pretty generic looking.

    Nite Owl looks too much like Batman. (Sure they are similar characters, but very different also. I feel Nite Owl is not a very "dark" character, and making him into a 2nd rate Batman would not be doing his character justice.)

    Also I thought Rorshach's voice was a more distinctive monotone. He sounds just like any random guy whispering in this.

    And they didn't show any footage of the "vintage" comic book characters (i.e. the first generation Watchmen) so bummer on that.

    But based on the production clips it seems like the director is really trying to be true to the story and look of the comic, so as long as they don't change the ending I don't see that it could be THAT horrible, no matter if Alan Moore has already disowned it (he disowns like ALL his movie adaptations, doesn't he?)

    That said, I still wish Darren Aronofsky had taken over the directorial reigns.

    Btw, is Smashing Pumpkins doing the soundtrack or is that just for the trailer?

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by CRCulver (715279)

      But based on the production clips it seems like the director is really trying to be true to the story and look of the comic, so as long as they don't change the ending I don't see that it could be THAT horrible,

      Considering that my major complaint of Watchmen is the ending, I think changing it could only help. See my review at the Amazon listing for Watchmen [amazon.com] , but basically I felt Moore could have created a much more refreshing plot than having the supervillian ultimately explain his whole scheme in dialog

      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by franksands (938435) *
        I love that ending exactly because the heroes think that he is just monologuing, when that is not exactly what happens. I was pretty much vague to avoid spoilers. Watchmen is definitely one of the best comics there is, so it is a big challenge to bring it to the screen. Even more if you consider the parallel stories and subplots.
      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by Kelbear (870538)

        While it made no pretense of subtlety, the way in which the supervillain ultimately explains his scheme was markedly different from the norm, and he explicitly points out why. It was a creative twist on an old standby which was still pretty effective in keeping me engaged.

        It's a spoiler, and wikipedia spoils it as well.

      • by SuiteSisterMary (123932) <slebrun.gmail@com> on Monday July 21, 2008 @04:24PM (#24279949) Journal

        I think you missed the point. Spoilers ahoy.

        Ozy isn't uttering forth a monologue; he's distracting everybody. He's already won. Further, he's not trying to show them how smart he is, daring them to outthink him, Riddler-style; he's giving himself up for judgement. He wouldn't have stopped any of the heroes had they decided to go reveal the plan; you'll note that he lets Rorshach go. Further, he seeks absolution from Dr. Manhattan.

        In other words, the entire point of that scene is to send up the comic book trope.

        • When Ozymandis and Dr. Manhattan are talking at the end, Dr. Mahnattans says, "It is highly unlikily Rorshach will reach the mainland". Moments before, he obliterated him. In other words, he seemingly lied to Ozymandis. There is so much other stuff buried in that novel that I've wondered if that was another one I just haven't figured out yet.

        • ... the entire point of that scene is to send up the comic book trope.

          In particular: A major issue with comic heroes is the ends/means issue. Comic "heroes" regularly "fight crime" using methods that are forbidden for that purpose. Warrantless surveillance (such as Superman's hearing and vision), terroristic threats (such as Batman's whole schtick), etc.

          Ozy's plan just scales up the moral quandary to a global, survival of humanity, scale, and rubs the heroes' noses in it.

          Ozzy made his choice. But he isn

          • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

            by Weaselmancer (533834)

            Also SPOILERS:

            Ozzy made his choice. But he isn't sure he made the right one. So he wants a sanity check from his peer group - and suitable punishment if they decide he did wrong: "... on the mercy of the court.". To keep them honest he puts them in the same position he was in. If they decide the other way they can punish him - and in the process undo what he did. If they decide the same way they're accessories after the fact. And if some decide each way the ones that side with him are left with murder of the others as the only way to maintain the achievement of the "good end".

            Not just that. They can either undo what he did, or keep quiet and effectively be accomplices. They all are now in the same boat.

            Understandably, Rorschach realizes this and refuses to be complicit in Ozy's crime. He's a zero-tolerance type. Burn the world down if you must, but crime must be punished. That is why he refuses.

            It's also probably why he dares Dr. Manhattan to destroy him. He knows he has to go public and that will most likely be the end of the world. Better he should d

            • Understandably, Rorschach realizes this and refuses to be complicit in Ozy's crime. He's a zero-tolerance type. Burn the world down if you must, but crime must be punished. That is why he refuses.

              You know, it suddenly occurs to me that Rorschach is the closest thing in Watchmen to a classic comic-book character; four colour morality, only kind of in the opposite direction. Where Superman is always good and right, Rorschach is the mirror image of that; black and white, the negative side of utter uncompromise.

              And he dies for it. It's all a metaphor for the old style of comics being killed off for being utterly unable to adapt.

              Or something.

              • by Ungrounded Lightning (62228) on Tuesday July 22, 2008 @12:27AM (#24284515) Journal

                You know, it suddenly occurs to me that Rorschach is the closest thing in Watchmen to a classic comic-book character; four colour morality, only kind of in the opposite direction.

                Rorschach is a Psychopath, attempting to compensate by becoming rule-bound (and doing it poorly). Moore has the personality dead-on.

                (It's interesting that the inspirations for Rorschach were apparently Steve Ditko's "Mr. A" and "The Question" - attempts at Objectivist superheros. Objectivism is a philosophy that starts from pure selfishness and derives the nonaggression principle and motivation for other behavior traits that keep its adherents within the law and make them people who, while often not likable, can be gotten along with. As such it's accessible to psychopaths. Teaching Objectivism to career criminals, motivating them to adopt its behavioral ruleset as a compensation, may be the only consistently successful rehabilitation program that has ever been studied.)

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by mmkkbb (816035)

      That song was already in the Batman and Robin soundtrack, and even had its own video. I don't think they'll retread it. Early teasers use placeholder music all the time. I can't count the number of times I've heard Mortal Kombat background music (it's mostly ethnic-sounding drums) or the music from The Fugitive (film version) in a trailer for a totally different movie.

      • "300" had Nine inch nails in the trailer. And then nothing in the film... I was let down!
        • Amen.

          If 300 had NIN in it, it would have been the only thing I liked about 300. Im fairly excited about The Watchmen, but knowing that its the same director doesnt sit well.

          I think the best Trailer music ive seen/heard so far is the use of Clint Mansell's - Lux Aeterna [youtube.com] (From Requiem For A Dream) for one of the Lord Of The Rings trailers...

          But its a great theme for anything envolving a battle or any kind really, I never get sick of it, its like the beginning of Carl Orff's - O Fortuna [youtube.com] (From Carmina Burana)

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by icegreentea (974342)
        Indeed. There's a niche market for creating music suitable for trailers/other place holders. Immediate Music springs to mind. There's also a significant amount of reuse. For example, I remember at least one trailer for the Core used music from The Rock.
        • by CFTM (513264)

          And Hans Zimmer has been reusing his musical themes for quite some time now...it always cracks me up when I'm watching a movie and I'm like...hmmmm this sounds a lot like the rock! And then Hans ends up being the composer for the movie...

      • Yep. No point in commissioning a new work or paying to license a song when you can just re-use something that's already in the library.
      • "That song" is the Smashing Pumpkins - "The end is the beginning is the End". There are countless remixes of it... and yes, it was used for the Batman and Robin soundtrack!
        • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

          by Lbgrowl (1330167)
          It's actually "The Beginning is the End is the Beginning." The quieter one.
    • I saw this trailer before batman. I thought (for a second) that they were bringing val kilmer back as batman ... in the funny suit. Turns out, it wasn't batman ... it was Nite Owl.
    • by SputnikPanic (927985) on Monday July 21, 2008 @04:05PM (#24279655)

      I think the less than inspiring costumes may be intentional, as if to suggest that the costumed heroes are operating at one level, while Dr. Manhattan is operating at another level entirely. Another plane of existence, in fact.

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        I have to agree.

        You see, the other costumed heroes were just that - some had improved capabilities (like Ozymandias), and some had neat devices (like Nite Owl), but in the end they were all people whose costume was primarily aimed at concealing their identities.

        Dr. Manhattan was different... since he was no longer entirely human he was no longer affected by human norms and values (watch how his clothing becomes sketchier from his early days to the "present").

        I thought it was a pretty cool way of showing how

    • What on earth would make you expect Aronofsky to do a good job on a film like this?

    • by Sockatume (732728)
      Moore was actually pretty complimentary of David Hayter's script (inasmuch as he said it was good as he could hope for), which they apparently haven't deviated too far from. He's still dismissive of the idea of a movie version in on principle, of course.
    • by roc97007 (608802) on Monday July 21, 2008 @04:33PM (#24280093) Journal

      > Ozymandius's costume looks completely different (I miss his purple one!), and Silk Spectre's costume is pretty generic looking.

      Personally, I thought Ozymandius's costume in the comic book was kind of silly, and was somewhat relieved when they changed it for the movie. I'd tend to agree on silk spectre, except those faux garters are a little edgy.

      > Nite Owl looks too much like Batman. (Sure they are similar characters, but very different also. I feel Nite Owl is not a very "dark" character, and making him into a 2nd rate Batman would not be doing his character justice.)

      This is from memory way back in the eighties, but I seem to remember that Moore originally wanted to do this as a "parallel world" using the DC characters, but the company said no. I could be misremembering. But Night Owl was supposed to be this world's batman, and Dan Dreiberg struck me as the only really decent character of the whole bunch. As such, I'd expect him to be less "dark" than the other characters.

      > Also I thought Rorshach's voice was a more distinctive monotone. He sounds just like any random guy whispering in this.

      Did anyone else have trouble listening to Rorshach in the trailer? I could hear him fine in the "standard resolution" trailer, but his voice is drowned out by the music in the HD version. I wasn't expecting anything particularly different there -- Rorshach is a normal human, after all.

      > But based on the production clips it seems like the director is really trying to be true to the story and look of the comic, so as long as they don't change the ending I don't see that it could be THAT horrible, no matter if Alan Moore has already disowned it (he disowns like ALL his movie adaptations, doesn't he?)

      Agreed. The look is amazingly like the comic. And I applaud them for keeping it in 1985 instead of trying to twist the plot so it would fit in current times.

      I'm not familiar with Smashing Pumpkins... what song was that?

      • by (startx) (37027)

        I believe the song was either "The end is the beginning is the end" or "The beginning is the end is the beginning" off of the Batman Forever soundtrack. Horrible, Horrible movie, but a pretty good soundtrack!

        • by roc97007 (608802)

          > I believe the song was either "The end is the beginning is the end" or "The beginning is the end is the beginning" off of the Batman Forever soundtrack. Horrible, Horrible movie, but a pretty good soundtrack!

          That explains it. I made a huge effort to forget everything to do with that film. Just bought the song off itunes, though.

        • The one used in the Watchmen trailer is "The Beginning is The End is The Beginning" from The Smashing Pumpkins on the Batman & Robin soundtrack.

      • by Czarf (730417) on Monday July 21, 2008 @04:51PM (#24280359)

        This is from memory way back in the eighties, but I seem to remember that Moore originally wanted to do this as a "parallel world" using the DC characters, but the company said no. I could be misremembering. But Night Owl was supposed to be this world's batman, and Dan Dreiberg struck me as the only really decent character of the whole bunch. As such, I'd expect him to be less "dark" than the other characters.

        The Watchmen characters were originally supposed to be the characters DC purchased from Charlton Comics. When DC decided to use them in their universe instead, Alan Moore created new characters based on them. Nite Owl is his version of the Blue Beetle.

      • by Jardine (398197)

        Did anyone else have trouble listening to Rorshach in the trailer? I could hear him fine in the "standard resolution" trailer, but his voice is drowned out by the music in the HD version. I wasn't expecting anything particularly different there -- Rorshach is a normal human, after all.

        In terms of not having any superpowers, I guess he's normal in that respect. I would say that he's a very abnormal human though.

  • by HTH NE1 (675604) on Monday July 21, 2008 @03:54PM (#24279481)

    If you'd seen The Dark Knight, you'd have seen this trailer.

    • by edbulldog (851508) on Monday July 21, 2008 @03:59PM (#24279561)
      IF you saw The Dark Knight and IF you are from a country where they are showing this trailer. I surely didn'y saw it.
    • If you'd seen The Dark Knight, you'd have seen this trailer.

      Not yesterday in the theater I visited in the midwest.

    • by Telvin_3d (855514)

      They are not showing it at IMAX theatres. Just a FYI

      • by cens0r (655208)
        They showed it at my IMAX Friday night. I think it was done by the theater themselves, because there was about 10 seconds of harry potter music before it started.
    • If you'd seen The Dark Knight, you'd have seen this trailer.

      Nope. They skipped it for us. Saw 007 which I hope hope hope they don't screw up, they had a few others that were utterly forgettable to the point I don't remember what they were, but no Watchmen.

  • Looks freaking AWESOME. And Jackie Earle Haley is creepy looking enough to physically portray a great Rorschach (sp?)...

  • by jollyreaper (513215) on Monday July 21, 2008 @03:56PM (#24279513)

    Who watches the Watchmen trailer?

    Oh, right. That would be us.

    • by imipak (254310) on Monday July 21, 2008 @04:05PM (#24279657) Journal

      Oh man, I've not waited so eagerly for a film since, ooh, Matrix Reloaded, or Phantom Menace... or possibly Scanner, Darkly.

      This is not a good sign.

      Why, oh why, are all the films of Alan Moore stories made to date been so lame? (Let's see, Constantine - total turkey; V for Vendetta - probably the least bad so far, scrupulously faithful to surface texture whilst completely missing the point; League of Extraordinary Gentlemen - almost as bad as Constantine;... From Hell - well I've not seen that, but as us cricket fans would say, it returned to the pavilion without troubling the scorer.

      I know he's got his name pulled for reasons of principle, but really if it were purely down to "how good a film is it?" that would also be a good move.

      If anyone out there's only seen the crappy films but not read the books, do yourself a favour and pick them up. Start with Watchmen. It's one of those works that seems to get more relevant every year.

      Personally, I'm waiting for "D.R. And Quinch" or "Halo Jones" to be filmed =)

      • by ajm (9538)

        Halo Jones - Now that would be a excellent one. Three different sections would make it tough to do though. "Anybody could have done it."

      • by lgw (121541)

        I really liked the Constantine movie - why all the hate over that one?

      • by cptnapalm (120276)

        D.R. and Quinch would be so funny... If they did it serially, I'd buy a ticket for a hundred bucks for the summer camp story.

      • by Omestes (471991)

        What was wrong with A Scanner Darkly? It was MUCH better than I expected. But then again my expectations of anything adapted from PKD is REALLY low, lower than my expectations of anything Lucas and Spielberg do. In the end though, it was a pretty good adaptation, and the animation didn't give me a migraine like Waking Life did. The casting was good too, since... The actors manage to have the same foibles as the characters they portray (except maybe Reaves, but you must take some bad with the good)

        What

  • by ThanatosMinor (1046978) on Monday July 21, 2008 @04:00PM (#24279583)
    The trailer for Watchmen got the E.T. treatment.
    Just in case you were afraid that the character on screen was going to shoot you, his gun has been replaced by a walkie-talkie [wordpress.com].
  • I think it's pretty nifty that the dude playing Dr. Manhattan (Billy Crudup) is an actor that already has some pretty decent geek (well, otaku...) cred:

    he voiced Ashitaka in Mononoke-Hime.
  • Anyone know the name of the song in the trailer? I'm almost positive it's by the pumpkins, but I've never heard the song before (and I have a lot of pumpkins :) ).

  • Cool (Score:3, Informative)

    by Ours (596171) on Monday July 21, 2008 @04:04PM (#24279639)
    Every scene shown brings me back to it's corresponding scene in the comic. The characters look spot on. Damn is this getting my hopes up. It's going to be hard.
    • When I first heard they were making a Watchmen movie, I cringed. I remember what a sham League of Extraordinary Gentleman was, and I couldn't see Watchmen faring much better. Seeing the trailer, along with the recent track record of movies that finally do right by their comic book inspirations -- Iron Man, the rebooted Batman and Hulk -- I'm left with some hope that it might actually be pretty good after all.

  • Check that, Jingoistic gay porn...
  • naaaah - scratch that - 300 sucked giant gobs of poo. I was thinking of Wall-E. Wall-E was cute. I don't know how I got that confused. Prediction: Watchmen will rock the noobs and tards but disappoint the steadfast.
  • by Scareduck (177470) on Monday July 21, 2008 @04:11PM (#24279757) Homepage Journal
    tells me they don't have a lot of faith in this movie. February and March are typically dumping grounds for films that got made but nobody has confidence in.
  • Rorshach (Score:3, Interesting)

    by FlyingSquidStudios (1031284) on Monday July 21, 2008 @04:26PM (#24279995) Homepage
    Could anyone tell about Rorshach's mask? I always pictured it continually in (slow) motion, almost like a lava lamp... but it looks like the blots were unchanging. Maybe it just changes from scene to scene?
  • Looks good (Score:2, Interesting)

    by Debased Manc (1313649)

    Thought the trailer looked quite good - although given how iconic the bloody smiley is, I was surprised I didn't see it there, unless I missed it.

    Given the complexity and layers of the book, I don't expect it to be slavishly followed by the movie - in fact I hope it doesn't, and neither should any of the books fans as there's no way a movie could successfully manage that.

    I want a good Watchmen movie, one that has the themes and idea of the book, one that always has something new to discover in it and one th

    • by BigFire (13822)

      The smiley button is definitely there. Look at the Vietnam footage featuring a jovial Comedian flame torching some Viet Con. It's part of his post 60s custom.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by denzacar (181829)

      I want the spirit to be kept true to, not the actual pages.

      Then you are among the few.

      Most fans would rather have movies based on books and comics copied page for page to the screen than making it according to the spirit.
      Or whatever spirit means to the director, producers, studio execs, toy makers and actors.

      Read the EW article [ew.com] - it should help you see how much of the book has been copied verbatim and how much of it was adapted while being "true to the spirit".

      Oh... and the smiley is there. Comedian is wearing it in the Vietnam. Minus the bloodstain of course.
      And i

      • Re:Looks good (Score:4, Informative)

        by Blue Stone (582566) on Monday July 21, 2008 @08:04PM (#24282337) Homepage Journal
        from the linked article:

        Sure, there have been changes. The catastrophic climax is different.

        Doesn't sound promising, does it?

        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by denzacar (181829)

          Not necessarily. If done right.
          I know that it CAN be done right - Moore may be good but he is no god.

          Remember the first reactions to the news that the blond guy from that movie about gay cowboys and from that horrible movie about medieval knights from the 21st century - was going to play the Joker?
          After Nicholson's iconic performance?
          Come on! What the hell were they thinking?

          It can be done in a good way. Couple of them probably.
          Also, a thousand wrong ones too.
          But lets be optimistic for a change.

  • The question is... how much did they have to cut from the words?

    Clearly they are trying to do a faithful adaption. I 'll see twice even if it is horrible.

  • iTunes has a Watchmen "Motion Comic" episode up and it's a freebie.

    Now the bizarre thing is that the panels and text balloons are EXACTLY like the graphic novel, with some "motion" applied. It's not animated, per se, but it isn't static either. This is good, very good.

    The bizarre part is that the voices...ALL THE VOICES in Chapter 1, including females, are voiced by male "actors". And it's as bad as it sounds. In fact, the terrible voice acting almost ruins this.

    I decided that the opportunity to "read" the

  • The trailer came on an no one knew what the heck it was, and it was dead quiet when it ended. Basically all I got from the trailer was "Glowing blue guys".
  • by markh1967 (315861) on Monday July 21, 2008 @05:20PM (#24280671)
    There's a scene by scene comparison of the trailer and the relevant panels from the graphic novel here [ropeofsilicon.com]. It looks remarkably similar and I'm quite hopeful that this will be a credible conversion now.
  • My Qualms (Score:3, Insightful)

    by cptnapalm (120276) on Monday July 21, 2008 @05:48PM (#24280991)

    They show Nite Owl doing a jump kick to some prisoners face. Nite Owl is supposed to be a pudgy, middle aged loser at this point in his life.

    The action looks to be from the highly stylized school of superhero movie violence, which might look dated after seeing Dark Knight.

    It looks like the coloring has been played with a lot, making it look more surreal. If anything, making it look like one of those 70s cop movies would fit the comic better.

    This is not a "No" vote or anything. I'm going to reserve judgment on whether or not to see it after the story trailers come out. This was just some of the stuff that occurred to me while I was watching the trailer.

    Of course, I could just be hyper-paranoid that they will make a crappy movie out of an outstanding comic book.

  • It's a live action graphic novel, gawd!

  • by afabbro (33948) on Monday July 21, 2008 @09:35PM (#24283211) Homepage

    I know, heresy. But I always thought Watchmen was vastly overrated.

    In its day, it may have been novel - though the groundbreakingness is overrated. But I think it's coasting on the teenage memories of a lot of people who haven't read it in 20 years.

    The writing isn't that great. The stories aren't that good. The characters are not that interesting. Everything is overdone - in fact, to me it reads like high school prose. Not much subtlety to anything and quite a bit of boring violence. I have nothing against violence, but for example the rape scene is reminiscent of what a young teenage writer would think about if he was trying to write a rape scene. That is one example of many.

    And God if there isn't a lot of really tedious exposition!

    It's not tripe. It's just not nearly as impressive as everyone thinks.

    Side note: I've noticed that the things people remember about the Watchmen are mostly the artwork - Rorschach, the Owl's craft, Doc Manhattan, etc. The art is much better than the writing...I will be nice and refrain from extending that analysis to the rest of Alan Moore's work ;-)

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Lisandro (799651)

      Actually i thought the oppposite - i found the artwork (while still very good) rather bland when compared to the storyline, specially when contrasted with some modern comics (this one [hatrack.com] i read recently, in particular, has stunning artwork).

      To each one its own, i guess. Watchmen broke with a lot of superhero comics conventions, presenting a rich storyline with (*gasp*) believable characters, and the long expositions added a lot to this. I admit that in some bits it got rather tedious; for example, i could've d

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