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Don't Copy That Floppy! Gets a Sequel 523

Posted by timothy
from the not-the-jailhouse-fantasy-I-signed-up-for dept.
theodp writes "Back in 1992, the SIIA released Don't Copy That Floppy!, a goofy video in which anti-piracy rapper MC Double Def DP convinces a young lad not to copy a game by appealing to his sense of right and wrong. Now, to address what it calls 'new generations and new temptations,' the SIIA has uploaded a trailer for a new anti-piracy rap video — Don't Copy That 2 — that will be released this summer. To underscore the video's it's-not-just-a-copy-it's-a-crime message, the new film is a tad darker than the original. A smug teen who's downloading files from 'Pirates Palace' and 'Tune Weasel' finds his world turned upside down when automatic weapons-toting government agents break down the door and take his Mom away in handcuffs. The teen finds himself in a prison jumpsuit forced to tattoo shirtless adult inmates who eventually turn on him, physically attack him, and make him run for his life back to his jail cell (image summarizing his plight)."
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Don't Copy That Floppy! Gets a Sequel

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  • BILLY MAYS HERE... (Score:5, Insightful)

    by BillyMays (1587805) on Monday July 06, 2009 @10:40PM (#28603133)
    ...with scare tactics!

    Seriously though, the first DCTF was happy and upbeat (and for good reason, as many people simply didn't know that copying a floppy was piracy). What happened to that feel? Are we really at a point where we're so influenced by the RIAA/MPAA's ways of doing things that SIIA's first sequel in 17 years immediately jumps to scare tactics?

    Maybe it's just me, but I see this quickly becoming one of those "You wouldn't steal a car" type of things - jumping to such an extreme that it becomes a satire piece.
    • by MBCook (132727) <foobarsoft@foobarsoft.com> on Monday July 06, 2009 @10:50PM (#28603225) Homepage

      Watch the preview video. It's there now.

      I agree that at least DCTF served a purpose. This one is exactly where the RIAA/MPAA is. Kid copies some software, ends up making prison tattoos and being chased (so he can be beaten/killed) because he wasn't good at making the tattoo.

      It's clear cause and effect here: own a computer, be annoyed by an 80s reject rapper, get shanked in prison.

      What they need is another DCTF, just not corny. If they ran PSAs saying it's important to buy software, otherwise people won't be able to make The Sims 4, Crysis 5, or Barbie Horse Adventures 7: The Mysterious Case of the Calico Clydesdale, they could probably get a whole new generation of kids to think twice about copying.

      Instead they made themselves a joke again.

      Even if they had to do this campaign, did they really have to tie it into DCTF? That can't possibly lend them credibility. I bet if I showed this new video to the average 12 year old, they'd think it was some kind of internet sketch comedy thing.

      • by Zero_Independent (664974) <(moc.socyl) (ta) (orez.rm)> on Monday July 06, 2009 @10:56PM (#28603279)
        Even if they had to do this campaign, did they really have to tie it into DCTF? That can't possibly lend them credibility. I bet if I showed this new video to the average 12 year old, they'd think it was some kind of internet sketch comedy thing.

        You mean it's not?

        • by MBCook (132727) <foobarsoft@foobarsoft.com> on Monday July 06, 2009 @11:19PM (#28603463) Homepage

          That was literally my first thought when I saw this, but I checked out other videos by that YouTube user and it looks totally legit. If this is a joke, they went a long way.

        • by hairyfeet (841228) <bassbeast1968@NOspaM.gmail.com> on Tuesday July 07, 2009 @06:13AM (#28605609) Journal

          I honestly think they are just wasting their cash. Kids today are a HELL of a lot more cynical than we were in the 80s. They see the corruption, the obvious payoffs, the lies and the bullshit.

          Remember a few years ago when they had that little forced 'public service message" that they forced kids to watch at school? They did that at my oldest's school, and when he told me about it he was standing with a whole bunch of other kids waiting to be picked up. Nearly all the kids had iPods or Sandisks or some other MP3 player blasting in one ear while they had the other free for bullshitting. So I asked the kids "what did you think about it?" and their answer was pretty much variations on "RIAA are greedy pigs".

          So I really don't think it'll work. They have watched as every politician from Obama on down have been more than happy to do a 180 for a nice fat check, they think the entire system is total bullshit (I can't even convince mine to vote when they turn 18 "what is the point? They'll just take bribes and ignore you anyway" is what I get) and therefor are gonna do whatever the hell they want and give you the finger if you say something about it. So much for that whole "youth can change the world" huh?

      • by EdIII (1114411) * on Tuesday July 07, 2009 @12:02AM (#28603799)

        Instead they made themselves a joke again.

        Which works exactly again them. It tends to make young people take them less and less seriously. You might as well run a PSA against teen age sex by convincing young men there are teeth in young women's vagina's and their peepee's will turn green and fall off if they touch themselves.

        Of course nobody takes them seriously anymore.

        • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday July 07, 2009 @01:02AM (#28604125)

          You might as well run a PSA against teen age sex by convincing young men there are teeth in young women's vagina's and their peepee's will turn green and fall off if they touch themselves.

          Wait, that's not true?

          Woo Hoo! Hold my calls!

        • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

          by drinkypoo (153816)

          Which works exactly again them. It tends to make young people take them less and less seriously. You might as well run a PSA against teen age sex by convincing young men there are teeth in young women's vagina's

          Of course not... not with gums like that! Sheesh.

      • by TheSpoom (715771) * <slashdot@uberm00. n e t> on Tuesday July 07, 2009 @12:10AM (#28603855) Homepage Journal

        I bet if I showed this new video to the average 12 year old, they'd think it was some kind of internet sketch comedy thing.

        Ah, but what happens when they target it at a younger audience who doesn't know any better?

        Throw it into a DARE program (anti-drug education for those outside the US; called VIP in some areas of Canada) targeting 10-year olds who don't yet understand its stupidity, let it sit for a few years. Bingo, a generation of well-trained consumers who think free information is pure evil.

        • by Kadin2048 (468275) <slashdot.kadinNO@SPAMxoxy.net> on Tuesday July 07, 2009 @12:42AM (#28604033) Homepage Journal

          If it works anything as well as DARE has, I predict the Pirate Party will sweep the midterm elections in 2022 and we'll be singing "Arr to the Chief" in 2024.

        • by Zero__Kelvin (151819) on Tuesday July 07, 2009 @12:42AM (#28604037) Homepage

          "Throw it into a DARE program (anti-drug education for those outside the US; called VIP in some areas of Canada) targeting 10-year olds who don't yet understand its stupidity, let it sit for a few years. Bingo, a generation of well-trained consumers who think free information is pure evil. "

          Great idea! They can eliminate all illegal copying using the same techniques they used to win the war against citize^H^H^H^H^H^Hdrugs!

        • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

          by Anonymous Coward
          Please tell me this is sarcasm. I remember going through DARE and how my peers became interested in cannabis and alcohol soon afterwards. DARE had little to no effect on my age group.
          • by TheSpoom (715771) * <slashdot@uberm00. n e t> on Tuesday July 07, 2009 @01:50AM (#28604339) Homepage Journal

            I remember going through DARE and how my peers became interested in cannabis and alcohol soon afterwards. DARE had little to no effect on my age group.

            Thank God for that. I suspect it does have a lasting effect on more people than you suspect however. Consider that your peer group is not the same as other peer groups, who may be more susceptible to such indoctrination. Geeks tend to be more questioning than most.

            Don't get me wrong, I despise the "war on drugs" just as much as the current attempts to move technology back twenty years. I'm just saying that judging by the previous DCTF ad, they're aiming this at kids, and we should have some sort of counter argument ready for those who don't see the flaws of it immediately.

        • by socsoc (1116769) on Tuesday July 07, 2009 @02:43AM (#28604567)
          Believe me, as a DARE "graduate" we definitely understood how stupid it was at age 10, even if we had yet to ever try any drugs
        • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

          Throw it into a DARE program (anti-drug education for those outside the US; called VIP in some areas of Canada) targeting 10-year olds who don't yet understand its stupidity, let it sit for a few years. Bingo, a generation of well-trained consumers who think free information is pure evil.

          Have you looked around the schools today? 10 year olds are too busy seeding so they can get more out of those private trackers. While stoned.

        • by elrous0 (869638) * on Tuesday July 07, 2009 @10:01AM (#28607431)
          DARE cracked me up. The essential message was "Kids, if you ever smoke a joint, you're going to end up dying in the gutter." Especially funny now, considering that our last three U.S. Presidents were all avowed "druggies" (by DARE's standards). Maybe they should create a new "Kids, if you don't toke, you'll never get to be President" campaign.
      • funny (Score:3, Funny)

        by jdcope (932508)

        I bet if I showed this new video to the average 12 year old, they'd think it was some kind of internet sketch comedy thing.

        Funny, this whole thing makes me think of the IT Crowd piracy video... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8wRxfz_6E7o [youtube.com]

      • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

        There was a recent piece of "journalism" in australia that tried to make a tenuous link that "if you buy a DVD at a flea market you are funding terrorism" [brisbanetimes.com.au], sigh.
      • by Sobrique (543255) on Tuesday July 07, 2009 @03:26AM (#28604781) Homepage
        Always thought the best 'anti-piracy' ad would be from e.g. a set carpenter on a blockbuster - saying something like: "hi. My name's Mike. I work on the set here, where they're making the ${latest_big_blockbuster}. I'm not a 'big name' - I get paid ${reasonable_amount} per (day/month/year), and I quite like my job - I like making movies, that you can see in the cinema or on DVD. I'd like to thank you for paying for (your cinema ticket|this DVD). You see, it's the sales of the film that determine whether they make another one or not - and that means I get to keep my job, and you get to enjoy another film."
        • by tbannist (230135) on Tuesday July 07, 2009 @10:05AM (#28607499)

          Well, they actually did that PSA.

          The only problems were:
          A) They hired an actor to pretend to be a set builder.
          B) He was griping that he "only" worked 8 months a year.
          C) He was griping that he "only" earned $88,000 USD a year.
          D) He accused everyone watching the movie of being thieves.

          We talked to a local movie theater owner and politely explained that the anti-piracy advertisement was insulting his customers and making them feel unwelcome in his theater. We also mentioned that the message that his customer's hard earned money (most of whom make less in a year than the fake set builder makes in 8 months) should go to pay a relatively well off guy living in California to work less and earn more than them was not going to be received the way it was intended. Lastly we pointed out that the people in the theater have already *paid* for their ticket, if they were going to steal the movie they'd be at home in front of their computers and never see the PSA. Since that chat, I haven't seen that PSA or any other anti-piracy PSAs in theaters around here.

    • by cbiltcliffe (186293) on Monday July 06, 2009 @10:51PM (#28603229) Homepage Journal

      Since he's "running for his life," does that mean they're essentially saying "You wouldn't steal a car, but if you copy Microsoft Office, we'll kill you?"

      Sounds like a threat to me....

      • by fractoid (1076465) on Monday July 06, 2009 @11:17PM (#28603443) Homepage
        The "you wouldn't steal a car" ad always annoyed the hell out of me. Bad analogy, and all that. It wasn't until just now that I realised that this Peugeot ad [youtube.com] is what you're actually doing when you download media. You're using your own hardware to create a (usually lower fidelity) replica of the car.
        • by Goldberg's Pants (139800) on Tuesday July 07, 2009 @12:00AM (#28603791) Journal

          Got into this argument with someone today. They said they wouldn't be STEALING a movie they want to see. I pointed out that downloading it is hardly stealing when, by my downloading it, I am not depriving a single person from seeing it.

          The car analogy doesn't work unless when I download Big Robots Part 8, someone going to see the movie gets turned away. "Sorry, Goldberg's Pants pirated this film so you can't see it."

          And yet these idiots just don't get how their analogy is utterly flawed. The thing is the media have spent so much time yelling IT'S STEALING! IT'S STEALING! IT'S STEALING! that the majority have bought into the lie put forward by the RIAA, MPAA etc... Despite the fact that they can say it a million times, and it still won't make it true.

          People who get hauled up for downloading are NOT charged with stealing or theft. It'd be better for them if they were because theft, rape etc... Carry far lesser sentences than what they are ACTUALLY charged with. Criminal copyright infringement.

          On a related note, I saw a nice piece of juxtaposition the other day that highlights the insanity. The RIAA verdict saying $84,000 or whatever it was per song, right next to a story saying the victims families of the Air France crash would get $24,000.

          Three human lives are worth one song apparently.

    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      The efficacy of the ad (which Roger Ebert rated two middle fingers up) depends on copyright infringement actually involving jackbooted thugs and jail time, and we know that the content providers have agents in Washington. As others have noted below, the ad itself seems to be goofy and not necessarily the scare-tactic public service announcements we saw during the Bush I and Reagan eras.

      Also, one more Association to add to my shit-list.
    • The trailer for it seems very tongue-in-cheek so maybe they are still maintaining the happy and upbeat feel of the first.

    • by snowgirl (978879) * on Monday July 06, 2009 @11:13PM (#28603417) Journal

      People seem to have a big problem with understanding what "illegal" means. You cannot go to jail for every illegal action. Some illegal actions create a civil liability, and some create criminal liabilities... and then criminal liabilities are separated into misdemeanors and felonies.

      I've had issues with people commenting that "prostitution is like murder, it's illegal", and I point out, "No, prostitution is like jay-walking... it's illegal." Prostitution is a misdemeanor and will not get one a lot of time in jail. It's why prosecutors (hell, law enforcement themselves) are so eager to offer a prostitute immunity in order to testify against their pimp (which is a felony).

      People just have a very hard time understanding that you cannot be sent to jail for every illegal action. ESPECIALLY, a hard jail. Typically the worst that you can be hit for with copyright violation is fines... it can make your life difficult, or even hell, but it can't take away your freedom.

      • by Beardo the Bearded (321478) on Monday July 06, 2009 @11:38PM (#28603627)

        Moreover, the unlawful activities fall under different Acts (or statutes? What do Americans call them?)

        For example, murder is against the Criminal Code of Canada.

        Speeding is in the Motor Vehicles Act. (And there's a great loophole there, should you care to read through this Act.)

        Practicing Engineering without a licence is against the Engineers and Geoscientists Act.

        Unauthourized duplication of copyrighted material is against the Copyright Act.

        The list can go on and on but I won't bother.

        Anyway, all of the aforementioned activities are unlawful, but the difference in enforcement and penalties is extreme. It varies from a $125 file to life without parole. Like you, I've always hated the "if you've ever driven even ONE MILE over the limit, that's the same as SERIAL MURDER. IT IS ILLEGAL!!1!ELEVEN!" argument.

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        But it can take away your freedom. Most prosecutors won't touch a file sharing case but that doesn't mean they can't.
        From www.copyright.gov:

        (a) Criminal Infringement. â" (1) In general. â" Any person who willfully infringes a copyright shall be punished as provided under section 2319 of title 18, if the infringement was committed â" (A) for purposes of commercial advantage or private financial gain; (B) by the reproduction or distribution, including by electronic means, during any 180-day period, of 1 or more copies or phonorecords of 1 or more copyrighted works, which have a total retail value of more than $1,000; or (C) by the distribution of a work being prepared for commercial distribution, by making it available on a computer network accessible to members of the public, if such person knew or should have known that the work was intended for commercial distribution.

        This doesn't apply to every file sharer, but it does apply to many more than prosecutors would ever want to go after. But to say they can't take away your freedom for it, when they clearly can if they desire to, is false.

    • Scare tatics (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Lord Byron II (671689) on Monday July 06, 2009 @11:30PM (#28603559)

      Or like the anti-drug commercials that aired immediately after 9-11 that attempted to link smoking a joint with supporting Osama Bin Laden.

      • by it0 (567968) on Monday July 06, 2009 @11:56PM (#28603763)

        Just to put it into perspective. Al Queda is pressuring farmers in afghanistan to grow poppies to make cocaine. There is a large effort to convert to convert the farmers to grow something else like saffraan.

        But cocaine!= weed, but there is some truth in that message.

        • Re:Scare tatics (Score:5, Informative)

          by SplashMyBandit (1543257) on Tuesday July 07, 2009 @12:19AM (#28603909)
          Just to put some facts into perspective (you unfortunately appear to have crossed some facts, otherwise your post is otherwise relatively sound - must all be the weed you're getting)
          • Opium poppies are used to produce opium and can then be refined into heroin. Initially the Taliban (who are not Al Qaeda, but host them) were against drug production but have now resorted to hosting drug lords to fund their fight against the Western infidels (this really does remove what little moral high ground they might claim to have had).
          • Cocaine is derived from coca leaves (mostly grown in South America, which is rather far away from Afghanistan), and the Columbian government has had some success in reducing this (during its grinding war against FARC that has picked up successful momentum).

          In both cases (Afghanistan, Columbia) the drug trade (opium, cocaine) is used to fund rebellion against the central government. Destroy the drugs and the rebellion struggles. The Afghan farmers complain that legitimate crops pay poorly compared to poppies so pressure the Afghan government to resist Western suggestions of aerial crop eradication. It is unlikely that demand in the West for recreational drugs will be reduced completely (the recession helps aparently) so it crop eradication is a better bet in winning the drug war. Saffron is a substitute that pays better than wheat (provided it can be grown successfully).

          • Re:Scare tatics (Score:5, Insightful)

            by Zero__Kelvin (151819) on Tuesday July 07, 2009 @01:26AM (#28604227) Homepage
            OK. Now let's really put it into perspective. One of the most dangerous drugs on the planet is Alcohol. It is legalin the US. Osama isn't running any alcohol production/smuggling/distribution rings. Given that Marijuana, Cocaine, Heroin, etc. are only profitable to terrorists because the government chooses not to legalize and regulate them (in true hypocritical fashion), whom do we have to blame if they are making tons of money on the black market the government created and fuels again?
  • So... (Score:5, Funny)

    by Anonymous Coward on Monday July 06, 2009 @10:41PM (#28603145)

    Anyone got a link to the torrent?

  • by Aphonia (1315785) on Monday July 06, 2009 @10:44PM (#28603167)
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CGXavXZwRcg [youtube.com] From the IT crowd (BBC) - an anti piracy ad. Except its for films. yet its a better video.
  • British TV (Score:5, Interesting)

    by jciarlan (1152991) on Monday July 06, 2009 @10:45PM (#28603171) Homepage
    Forgive the youtube link, but a British TV show called "The IT Crowd" did a pretty good anti-piracy warning. [youtube.com]
  • DP (Score:5, Funny)

    by tnok85 (1434319) on Monday July 06, 2009 @10:46PM (#28603183)
    Is it just me or does MC Double Def "DP" sound like a black porn star's stage name?
  • A smug teen who's downloading files from 'Pirates Palace' and 'Tune Weasel' finds his world turned upside down when automatic weapons-toting government agents break down the door and take his Mom away in handcuffs. The teen finds himself in a prison jumpsuit forced to tattoo shirtless adult inmates who eventually turn on him

    Huh, that's funny. Last I checked you normally don't get jail time for copyright infringement. Search warrants? For your computer maybe. Serving papers for a court date? Sure. Arrested on the spot? Don't think so. Jail time? Not to my knowledge. The only legal consequence the SIIA lists on their site [siia.net] are "significant fines for copyright infringement." Unless the kid was uploading unreleased Guns N' Roses tracks or orchestrating the huge operation of The Pirate Bay I don't think he'll be doing time.

    Maybe they should do a little more research before they imply that you will end up in a gulag tattooing cartoon characters on convicts?

    Don't get me wrong, I'd be fine with the kid (assuming he's 18+) getting a letter in the mail saying he has to appear in court and then a slow five year montage ending with him settling out of court and not being able to go to college or only attending a community college. That'd be pretty realistic. I still don't agree with it but that's how it works these days. Who knows? Maybe the over emphasized results will backfire on them and the general populace will see how unrealistic the charges are for copyright violation? I mean, that's not going to change until a politician looks bad taking a sack of money in campaign contributions ... or realizes that it bothers his constituents that lives are being ruined over something that maybe isn't so serious that a person should be financially hobbled for the rest of their life or next seven years from bankruptcy or whatever results. Huge fines are enough to stop me from copyright violations but lets face it, you're not going to jail if you do it. You're not a hardened criminal with a rap sheet serving time next to murderers if you're convicted of file sharing. You're most likely going to settle out of court and be financially stunted.

  • Can anyone provide a link to confirm that the SIIA is actually making this? The trailer jumped the shark when the kid started spinning the CD endlessly on his finger, so my first impression would be that it is a parody of the original.
  • Dangerous stuff (Score:5, Informative)

    by harmonise (1484057) on Monday July 06, 2009 @10:49PM (#28603213)

    ...finds his world turned upside down when automatic weapons-toting government agents break down the door and take his Mom away in handcuffs. The teen finds himself in a prison jumpsuit forced to tattoo shirtless adult inmates who eventually turn on him, physically attack him, and make him run for his life back to his jail cell

    The message I get from this is, "Wow, movies and music sound like dangerous stuff. I better avoid them at all costs whether purchased legally or not."

  • by Minwee (522556) <dcr@neverwhen.org> on Monday July 06, 2009 @10:51PM (#28603241) Homepage
    it's RIAA-porn.
  • by RLiegh (247921) on Monday July 06, 2009 @10:55PM (#28603269) Homepage Journal

    Because we've seen that the RIAA will go after your family if they don't think they can get any money out of you; regardless of whether or not any of you even own a computer!

  • endorsing prison rape of children? Because that is what it looks like. There is a better way to fight software piracy. [blogspot.com]
  • If you make copies of intellectual property, liscensed video games ans software programs, you will be erased with state violence.
    It is okay to kidnap and possibly kill people with state violence for things they do with ideas.
  • How else can he afford another solid gold Humvee? And diamond studded swimming pools? These things don't grow on trees.
  • The one of the news tickers in the video is describing the impeachment of the governor of Illinois a while back ... will the same thing happen to you if you pirate music?
  • by orkysoft (93727) <orkysoftNO@SPAMmyrealbox.com> on Monday July 06, 2009 @11:05PM (#28603349) Journal

    This one's much better:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=32wmepTVM3I [youtube.com]

  • To blatantly and deliberately mislead the public into believing something is a crime when it isn't.

    "Production of propaganda with an intent to mislead" or something.

    I bet it's already illegal in Germany.
     

  • I think I know where they get their inspiration. The description sounds just like the video for Weird Al's "Don't Download This Song": http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yz-grdpKVqg [youtube.com]

  • Yeah, watching that trailer my first response is "wow, they're douchefucks for doing that to someone over some media."

    Don't copy that floppy was funny and appealed to your sense of right and wrong/interest in supporting content creators so they'll be around to produce more good stuff. This just sounds like trying to scare people into line. Which can work, but it does rather rob you of any moral high ground when your argument is "or we'll fuck you up, put you in prison, and go after your family."
  • by MickyTheIdiot (1032226) on Monday July 06, 2009 @11:16PM (#28603431) Homepage Journal

    Do what's best for the corporation... or we'll throw your ass in jail.

    What a joke...

  • by dindi (78034)

    Regardless of what it is about, it is the worst short film/clip/propaganda I have seen in a long time. That includes local (Costa Rican) commercials and Latin American soap operas .....

    OMG .... shame on you for making me watch this

  • but when the rapping started they lost me.

  • by theodp (442580) on Monday July 06, 2009 @11:19PM (#28603459)

    A selection of U.S. companies from the SIIA Member Directory [siia.net]: Accenture, Adobe, AOL, Barclays, Bloomberg, CNN, Charles Schwab, Citi, Cognizant, CollabNet, College Board, Deloitte, Deutsche Bank, Fidelity, Goldman Sachs, Google, IBM, Infosys, Intel, Intuit, JPMorgan Chase, Lazard Freres, McGraw Hill, Merrill Lynch, Morgan Stanley, Novell, Oracle, Reuters, Salesforce, SAP, SAS, Standard & Poor's, Sun Microsystems, Symantec, Time Warner, UPI, The Wall Street Journal, Wells Fargo Bank.

  • by Boawk (525582) on Tuesday July 07, 2009 @12:00AM (#28603789)

    The teen finds himself in a prison jumpsuit forced to tattoo shirtless adult inmates who eventually turn on him, physically attack him, and make him run for his life back to his jail cell

    Sounds like an average day working tech support.

  • by Doug52392 (1094585) on Tuesday July 07, 2009 @12:07AM (#28603837)

    I thought I would point out the many inaccuracies in this film:

    1. The mother was fighting back to the evil paramilitary force that, without warning, smashed down her door and entered her house. She would have been shot because she clearly "endangered" the armed men's life.

    2. ANIME ANGEL TATOOS? In an American prison??? I doubt there are any anime nerds in lockup...

    The phrase "copycrime" really reminded me of "thoughtcrime" from 1984, which isn't a good message propaganda should be sending...

  • by V!NCENT (1105021) on Tuesday July 07, 2009 @03:01AM (#28604653)

    For me the only ethics in software is being able to share it with your friends. Did your mother teach you nothing?

    You know what is truely ethical?; Marking something and then sharing it with the rest of the world!

    And the only thing that is truely attacking the digital age are the proprietary software vendors and the pro-copyright bodies.

    Now get the fsck off my lawn!

  • by Bones3D_mac (324952) on Tuesday July 07, 2009 @04:18AM (#28605059)

    ... is a PSA that warns viewers that the content of most PSAs are rarely objective and are often funded by organizations trying to push their own agenda. (Some of which may actually be worse than the crap they're PSAing to us about.)

  • by oDDmON oUT (231200) on Tuesday July 07, 2009 @07:25AM (#28605915)

    The *IAA's want to become the next SS/KGB/Stasi, using paramilitary actions as a way to keep the dollars trickling into their dying business models.

    The truly scary part?

    That suits in both Hollywood and on the Beltway believe that this is a viable way to treat the American people.

  • by scharkalvin (72228) on Tuesday July 07, 2009 @07:57AM (#28606093) Homepage

    The description of the video sounds like Weird Al's "Don't download this song" video.

  • I love how... (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Civil_Disobedient (261825) on Tuesday July 07, 2009 @10:41AM (#28608087)

    I love how they use the coercive threat of prison violence. These days it's just accepted as fact that the prison system is completely and utterly broken beyond repair.

Repel them. Repel them. Induce them to relinquish the spheroid. - Indiana University fans' chant for their perennially bad football team

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