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VLC Team Announces Video Editor In the Works 120

Posted by timothy
from the just-crazy-enough-to-work dept.
eldavojohn writes "Despite news that VLC might not have anyone to work on the Mac release, Lifehacker brings word of a video editor that the VLC team is working on dubbed VideoLAN Media Creator. It hasn't been released yet (git clone git://github.com/VLMC/vlmc.git) but a pre-release is due out soon."
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VLC Team Announces Video Editor In the Works

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  • Great! (Score:5, Insightful)

    by hairyfeet (841228) <bassbeast1968@@@gmail...com> on Wednesday December 23, 2009 @04:12PM (#30538930) Journal
    Can't go wrong with VLC, runs on every OS, opens even the PITA formats. Can't wait! Go VLC Team!
    • Re:Great! (Score:5, Informative)

      by clone53421 (1310749) on Wednesday December 23, 2009 @04:21PM (#30539012) Journal

      VLC is great when it comes to playing media. I really can’t find fault with it on that front.

      When it comes to encoding media... well, it’s good enough... usually... if you don’t mind playing with it a bit. (Admittedly it does seem better than it used to be. I used to find that more often than not the encoder would crash with some odd error in the message log.) It doesn’t seem to always create portable files – I’ve had output files that only played in VLC, or wouldn’t seek properly, etc. It can’t simultaneously capture the screen and the stereo mix (I have a .js that launches two copies – one to capture the screen, one to capture the stereo mix – and must recombine the separate video/audio tracks in an external video editing suite). Minor details like that...

      I’m going to approach this with a considerable amount of skepticism until I find out how well this video editing feature works, unfortunately.

      • by sopssa (1498795) *

        I agree, it always takes several tries to output a working file when recording from internet stream too. And even then its a little bit risky stuff.

      • by timeOday (582209)
        Well, the bar for nonlinear video editing on Linux is pretty low, so they have that in their favor. (Cinelerra, for one, should be renamed "Bamboo Shoots Under Your Fingernails," not due to the crappy UI, but due to the fact that it crashes constantly of most of what it tries to do doesn't actually work). For what it's worth, Avidemux (though simplistic) is currently the best of the field (but as always, expect A/V desynchronization - the bain of all audiovideo applications). Perhaps the zoo of codecs a
      • I like VLC, don't get me wrong. It is a go-to program I use in many cases. The fact that it is entirely self contained makes it very useful. I use it in situations where installing the required codecs wouldn't be workable, and also to play back problematic media. For example at work I have Sony Vegas installed on my system which installs its own MPEG codecs. Now part of these codecs is they are really strict, they don't play broken media. Ok well and good, when you encode something you want it done right. H

    • by dziban303 (540095)
      VLC would be great -- if they integrated support for MCE IR receivers. It can't be that hard to do. WTF?
  • Sounds exciting (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Ironchew (1069966) on Wednesday December 23, 2009 @04:13PM (#30538940)

    If it has the same quality and compatibility as VLC Media Player, then it would be a welcome beacon here in Penguin Land.

    • by greenguy (162630)

      No kidding. I'm giving serious thought to getting a Mac -- just for its video editing.

      To be fair, while I have tried every video editor that runs on Linux and found every single one lacking, it isn't entirely their fault. They can't import, or see the camera at all, and I assume that's a problem in the system, not the application. Will the VLC editor be able to work around this?

      • by dangitman (862676)

        To be fair, while I have tried every video editor that runs on Linux and found every single one lacking, it isn't entirely their fault. They can't import, or see the camera at all, and I assume that's a problem in the system, not the application.

        Well, something is screwed up somewhere, because "seeing" and controlling a DV camera over a Firewire connection is a pretty trivial and well-understood affair.

        • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

          by AliasMarlowe (1042386)

          To be fair, while I have tried every video editor that runs on Linux and found every single one lacking, it isn't entirely their fault. They can't import, or see the camera at all, and I assume that's a problem in the system, not the application.

          Well, something is screwed up somewhere, because "seeing" and controlling a DV camera over a Firewire connection is a pretty trivial and well-understood affair.

          Indeed, it is simple. But allowing user level program access to firewire is actually a significant security risk, so most distros restrict access to /dev/raw1394, /dev/dv1394, /dev/video1394, or whatever the local device names are. This is probably the issue that GP is encountering. I make a shell script with the requisite "sudo chmod a+rwx /dev/dv1394" type commands to be run before invoking the program which is to control the dv camera and grab the video. These privileges should be revoked afterwards (and

          • by dangitman (862676)
            Hey, an actual useful reply! Thanks for that. But the idea of 1394 access being a security risk seems a bit overblown, unless you have physical access security issues already. How is anybody going to get to your Firewire port, unless they have physical access to your machine already? And wouldn't the same issue exist with USB?
            • Most likely the lockdown of 1394 is because of both the networking aspect of firewire, and the fact that firewire has DMA access. Which could be a major security risk. USB does not have these "features" so does not pose as much of a threat.
              • I know...
                Automatic Teller Machine (ATM) Machine
                Personal Identification Number (PIN) Number
                Direct Memory Access (DMA) Access
              • by dangitman (862676)
                But if your machine is not connected to anything else besides peripherals, then why would it be any more of security risk than USB? Very few people connect their computers together with Firewire. It just seems very odd. Do Linux users not use Firewire hard drives or make routine use of other Firewire peripherals like scanners and audio interfaces? Having an interface that is so widely used locked down seems like a major pain in the butt.
                • by dotgain (630123)
                  The handling of drives, etc. is not done with /dev/raw1394 so the mounting of Firewire drives on Linux really is no different to USB. Firwire itself is a lot more versatile than USB and consequently needs a more complex security model. On the (admittedly small) fraction of Linux machines with potentially hostile people running programs, this security most certainly is necessary.

                  That's life on a Unix-like system I'm afraid. Ideally, distributions would have lovely baselayouts that would take care of ever

          • by jrumney (197329)
            Or just add the users that need access to the "video" group.
      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by kbielefe (606566)

        Definitely a driver problem. Kino especially is pretty good at importing from a DV camera. You'd have to fix it for VLC too. Try
        # modprobe raw1394
        # modprobe ohci1394
        # modprobe video1394

        • A lot of times the problem with kino is you don't have correct permissions on the 1394 device. Change the permissions to your username or group on /dev/raw1394 and is usually works great.
          • by Daengbo (523424)

            It should be pretty easy to create a udev rule for that which automatically changes permissions when the camera is plugged in.

      • by V!NCENT (1105021)

        Kdenlive imports from:

        1. Low resolution camcorder (Raw and AVI DV editing).
        2. Mpeg2, mpeg4 and h264 AVCHD (small cameras and camcorders).
        3. High resolution camcorder files, including HDV and AVCHD camcorders.
        4. Professional camcorders, including XDCAM-HD streams, IMX (D10) streams, DVCAM (D10) , DVCAM, DVCPRO, DVCPRO50 streams and DNxHD streams (decoding only, encoding untested). Please note that Kdenlive does not offer the original codecs, but only that we use FFmpeg free software codecs, which can read or

      • by roju (193642)

        iMovie isn't nearly as useful as I'd hoped it would be. You'd have to go for Final Cut (Express/Pro) too if you got a mac. I'm excited to see what happens with the VLC editor.

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by V!NCENT (1105021)

      A beacon? Never heared of Kdenlive (http://www.kdenlive.org/) ?

      The 'Penguin Land' already has a Sony Vegas killer. It's the AmaroK of video editing. It's Qt4.x and because of that cross platform.

  • Finally (Score:2, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward

    I've been waiting for this for a long time. I find it frustrating that I can play basically any video format at any resolution, while not being able to transcode. My computer obviously understands the video files, so why can't I take an .mpeg file and easily save it to quicktime format? All the open source video editing/transcoding tools are trash right now. A VLC video editor is going to be really awesome.

    • Re:Finally (Score:5, Informative)

      by clone53421 (1310749) on Wednesday December 23, 2009 @04:23PM (#30539026) Journal

      VLC is already able to transcode media.

      That said, I haven’t been overly impressed with its performance. Strange crashes, glitchy files, etc.

      For instance, when transcoding a .flv, the first keyframe is always dropped – resulting in only a smear of black/gray for the first second or two of the output file.

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        That said, I haven't been overly impressed with its performance. Strange crashes, glitchy files, etc.

        Yup, it uses more CPU than it needs to, but at least it provides the support for various video formats that my files are in. Some of these issues are to blame on ffmpeg and others are purely on VLC. What would really be nice is if someone could implement some codecs using blocks [wikipedia.org], even if it is at this point purely to find out if this a) makes a notable difference in performance and b) provides code that is s

    • by Wescotte (732385)
      ffmpeg is great for that sort of thing

      ffmpeg -i INPUTFILE.mpeg -sameq outputfile.mov <-- Now it's quicktime compatiable
      • by zmollusc (763634)

        God damn quicktime! Its sole saving grace is that it isn't as bad as realplayer. Screw realplayer!

        Sorry about that. It is a natural reflex of mine that developed while using both products.

  • Avisynth (Score:5, Interesting)

    by PhrostyMcByte (589271) <phrosty@gmail.com> on Wednesday December 23, 2009 @04:24PM (#30539038) Homepage
    Hopefully it wraps Avisynth [avisynth.org] -- it's got some incredible community-made scripts and plugins that are unmatched by anything else, but isn't newbie-friendly when it comes to what most people think of as "video editing".
    • Re:Avisynth (Score:4, Informative)

      by MobyDisk (75490) on Wednesday December 23, 2009 @04:46PM (#30539226) Homepage

      No way. Avisynth is a Windows-only product that is tied to Microsoft's APIs. VLC is a cross-platform application.

      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by ZERO1ZERO (948669)
        Anything equivelant in Penguin Land? Avisynth is extremely powerful.
        • by Anonymous Coward

          Ive been using KDEnlive for the past few months and it does the job for us.
          We basically want to take a few pictures and videos from our digital camera, join them with a few transition effects and put our fave mp3 in the background.
          It does the job the way Windows Moviemaker does the job, its not a 25,000$ program but for the youtube generation's needs, its fine.

          Ive tried all the different Linux programs and both my 8yr old and nieces prefer KDEnlive, so its the one we use.

      • Well, a Linux port has been in progress for some time. If the VLC crew were to lend a hand, it would surely get done faster and with higher quality. I agree that cross-platform is essential.
      • by lawpoop (604919)
        There is an AviSynth 3 [unite-video.com], which is planned to run on Linux, but development seems to have stalled. Last news from 2007. :(
  • oh no! (Score:4, Funny)

    by clone53421 (1310749) on Wednesday December 23, 2009 @04:25PM (#30539046) Journal

    It hasn't been released yet (git clone git://github.com/VLMC/vlmc.git)

    They’re out to get me!

    • by mcgrew (92797) *

      It made me think of Monty Python's "The Argument" sketch.

      "But I came in here for an argument!"

      "Oh, this is abuse. You want room 12a, down the corridor."

      "Thank you."

      "You're welcome." (Man he's speaking to leaves...)

      "Stupid git!"

    • Re: (Score:1, Funny)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Correction: they're out to git you.

    • lolz, but really... this is the first time I've seen the "git://" protocol specifier. I had to resort to the Fount of All Knowledge [wikipedia.org] to find out what in tarnation "git" is:

      Git is a free distributed revision control, or software source code management project with an emphasis on being fast. Git was initially designed and developed by Linus Torvalds for Linux kernel development.

      Every Git working directory is a full-fledged repository with complete history and full revision tracking capabilities, not dependent

      • >>I bet I'll end up seeing git:// all over the place on Slashdot soon.

        Oh, no way. We all se bitkeeper here. Just because their logo is a triforce.

        Thank you, I'm here all week.

    • by geekoid (135745)

      they need to get through 54320 of you first.

    • by gollito (980620)

      It hasn't been released yet (git clone git://github.com/VLMC/vlmc.git)

      They’re out to GIT me!

      There, fixed that for you

  • Yeah yeah! Oh, yeah! (Score:5, Interesting)

    by ichthus (72442) on Wednesday December 23, 2009 @04:28PM (#30539076) Homepage
    Could this mean we finally get a decent video editor in Linux? Apologies to the Cinelerra, Kino, etc. people, but (and I really hate to say this) many of the simplest and cheapest Windows offerings put these projects to shame.

    I know it makes me seem like a total douche to put down projects that many people put a lot of time and effort into, but come on! The sound editor front is even worse! Audacity is today what Cool Edit was in 1998.
    • by malevo (952162)

      Kdenlive [kdenlive.org] is a pretty good video editor for Linux, FreeBDS and MacOS X.

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by adpe (805723)
        I'm not OP and I'm love and use linux exclusively, but I have to agree with him. I've used about every video editor there is and (compared to other OSes standards) even kdenlive is a piece of shit. It has most basic features, and even some advanced ones, but at least on my three machines, its crashing left and right.

        I personally think it's because of the sad state that linux multimedia subsystems are in (oss/alsa/pulseaudio/whatever kde comes with up next), but whatever it is, linux video editing is nowh
      • by ichthus (72442)
        I will definitely give Kdenlive another look. It's been since 2007 since I looked at it, and I have to say I don't even remember what I didn't like about it.
      • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

        by roju (193642)

        Kdenlive was unusable for me in Ubuntu (Hardy and Intrepid). It crashed within a minute, every time.

        • I haven't done any video editing it in around 6 months, so I don't know what's their current status, but it did get noticeably more stable for me around the 0.7.3 version. Ah the wonders of Arch and rolling releases ;)

          It would still crash occasionally, though. The only saving grace is that it's auto-save is impeccable.

      • Re: (Score:1, Troll)

        by LordKaT (619540)

        kdenlive is a piece of garbage, and its developers ought to be burned at the goddamn stake for making that abomination of a video editor.

    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by supersloshy (1273442)

      Ever hear of Kdenlive [kdenlive.org]? I use it all the time. Uses FFMPEG, has lots of nice effects, and the most recent release has been very stable for me so far ;)

    • by pydev (1683904)

      I know it makes me seem like a total douche to put down projects that many people put a lot of time and effort into, but come on! The sound editor front is even worse! Audacity is today what Cool Edit was in 1998.

      Audacity does everything I want it to do. It doesn't include some of the functionality of tools like Adobe Audition or Soundbooth because that functionality is provided by other tools within the Linux environment.

      If you need all this functionality bundled up with point-and-click ease, free Linux t

      • by ichthus (72442)
        That's a tired, old argument that was laid to rest long ago. Nobody uses sox any more, and even command line editors like mencoder and ffmpeg take an everything-but-the-kitchen-sink approach to functionality. Emacs is a great example (and arguably went overboard) of a popular app with many functions. I struggle to think of any modern-day Linux apps that hold true to the little app that could mentality. Maybe vi? But, then there's vim, so...

        On a command line basis, your argument may hold some merit.
        • by pydev (1683904)

          That's a tired, old argument that was laid to rest long ago.

          I'm not making an argument, I'm just stating a fact: Linux GUI tools don't have those functions because most Linux developers don't feel a need for them.

          But, in a GUI environment, it's ridiculous -- GUIs are the interface to pull all the little tools together.

          That's only one of many possible functions of a GUI. Many professional users don't need a GUI to "pull all the little tools together", they need a simple UI that does a few things really well

        • Nobody uses sox? But I'm an Asterisk sysadmin, you insensitive clod!

          And, besides my job, I find myself using ffmpeg and sox all the time.

          And, what you are saying about the little app that could is totally wrong. First, it's not a GNU/Linux concept, it's a Unix concept, and part of it's design.

          If you think there are no apps like that being used today, well, less, cut, awk, find, grep and friends would like a word with you. Sure, users don't use them, but the Unix toolchain is still the way we do things aroun

    • by miruku (642921)

      PiTiVi [pitivi.org] (wp [wikipedia.org]) seems interesting, not tried it myself so far.

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by DittoBox (978894)

      If you want a multi-track recording suite, check out Ardour.

      http://ardour.org/ [ardour.org]

      • by ichthus (72442)
        Ardour looks really cool, and I installed it just last week. I got as far as getting an error message about not being able to load/connect to the Jack audio server (??) before I gave up.

        I'll have to look into it more during the holiday break -- may have something to do with the fact that I'm a Fedora user, and we suffer from the PulseAudio affliction
    • I agree on cinelerra but not on Audacity. Audacity is like Notepad for audio, it's simple and does it's thing well (and doesn't crash which makes it actually better than notepad).

      • and doesn't crash

        ...but when it does, or when the computer crashes by no fault of Audacity’s, you’re fucked.

        All those 1-second .au files? Yeah. Audacity helpfully offers to delete them for you, but what you really wanted to do was recover your work... which it can’t do... so you’re stuck with the tedious, boring task of importing dozens or hundreds of tiny audio clips to try and recover the audio that you recorded before it crashed.

        Why there is no way to do this automatically is absolutely beyond my

        • by Chuffpole (765597)

          check out Audacity Recovery Utility - worked for me the one time I needed it.
          http://www.mesw.de/audacity/recovery/ [www.mesw.de]

          • Good to know. Thanks.

            It looks like I had an older version of Audacity, anyway... according to that, versions beyond 1.3.2 have crash recovery built-in. I guess I’ll have to upgrade.

            Since I don’t do long recordings in Audacity anymore anyway (that ended about 5 months ago), it’s really not an issue for me anymore, but it had been in the past, and always on a non-net-connected computer which made it difficult to Google up some solutions. (They’re probably still using that old version o

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by thomst (1640045)
      Ichthus commented:

      "I know it makes me seem like a total douche to put down projects that many people put a lot of time and effort into, but come on! The sound editor front is even worse! Audacity is today what Cool Edit was in 1998."

      Actually, it's not even as capable as Cool Edit was more than a decade ago. Specifically, Audacity does not support MIDI, whereas, AIR, Cool Edit Pro did. And that's the main reason why Audacity is utterly worthless for music production: because it can't sync to MIDI. So, no

    • by horza (87255)

      I've not tried it myself, but I've heard good things about OpenShot [openshotvideo.com]. I'd be interested to hear what people on here think about it.

      Phillip.

    • Agreed. I'm secretly hoping the Videolan folks will prove to be the ones to get it right. We need something stable, cross-platform (including Windows!) and compatible for starters. If VLMC can be to the NLE world what Avidemux is to the simple video editors world, that will be an important step in improving the viability of Linux. Anything that challenges Premiere and Vegas is good.
  • by jameskojiro (705701) on Wednesday December 23, 2009 @04:47PM (#30539230) Journal

    I would like something that can open anything and then edit it.

    It would be nice to have a good video editor, One that was free back in the day was DDClip it worked pretty good back in 00' . Anythign is better than the abortion that is Windows Movie Maker....

    • I would like something that can open anything and then edit it.

      It would be nice to have a good video editor, One that was free back in the day was DDClip it worked pretty good back in 00' . Anythign is better than the abortion that is Windows Movie Maker....

      In the sense that VLMC can read anything and subsequently write something, yes, probably. I very much doubt the number of output formats will match the number of input formats, though.

      I always thought Windows Movie Maker was good for video stitching, the problem was it could only output to a WMV, which is understandable (msft and all that).

    • Yeah editing MKV's would be nice, I have had it with VirtualDub and the likes.
      Anything that supports many formats and can edit them would be welcome.
    • The question is whether the editing will happen directly with the 'compressed' streams or whether it will need to convert it to something akin to DV first?

  • Vegas (Score:2, Interesting)

    by soundguy (415780)

    I'm hoping it take after Vegas, which leaves all other editors in the dust (even Avid) when it comes to ease of use. I especially like being able to drag the end of one clip over another on the time line for instant crossfades without having to deal with creating a transition. Fade in/out is a simple matter of dragging the upper corner of the clip one way or the other. Timelines are a series of thumbnails that change in real-time when you expand or contract, cut, stretch etc. (stretch/contract is a simple c

    • For what its worth, nearly every mid to high end commercial editor uses similar UIs. I know from personal usage that Adobe Premiere (even the pre-CS versions) had similar UI. And I won't even comment on Final Cut Pro. Suffice to say that it does all of that.
      • by soundguy (415780)

        "Similar" doesn't cut it. FC is woefully inadequate. You can't overlap media on the same timeline. Premier is especially annoying as it won't do a damned thing until you define a "project". In Vegas, you just drag clips onto the timeline from any file manager. It creates it's own internal project files which you can name and save or just toss if you want to. (quick & dirty one-off tasks don't need to be saved) FC also has a limited display of spaced thumbnails. Vegas has a continuous row directly refle

  • Gstreamer and MLT (Score:1, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward

    I guess I'll be the first to give a shout-out to Pitivi [pitivi.org] and Open Shot Video [openshotvideo.com].

    Reading Jonathan Thomas' ( Open Shot Video ) valiant attempt at creating a NLE from Gstreamer/Gnonlin [sourceforge.net] it appears that the Gnonlin API/toolkit/whatever is VERY confusing to program a video editor in ( and unstable ). But since Jonathan chose MLT [mltframework.org] things are rapidly moving along for him. I often wonder why KDEnlive is so unstable because Kino is rock solid ( for me ) and it is also based on Dan Dennedy's impressive MLT toolkit.

    But I

    • by Wescotte (732385)

      Open Shot looks promising but from what I've seen by playing with it recently it really needs to implement the standard two viewer interface like almost every other NLE out there. I just can't stand to edit any other way. I'll keep my eye on it though as it seems to be making progress very rapidly.

      I'm looking forward to http://lumiera.org/ [lumiera.org] as it seems to be the only project with the goal of creating a professional NLE/Compositing application. Nothing will make me happier when I can quit using Adobe Premiere

  • by FromellaSlob (813394) on Wednesday December 23, 2009 @05:16PM (#30539450)

    Avidemux [fixounet.free.fr] always seemed like a natural partner to VLC to me. Based off the same FFMPEG code, QT or GTK interfaces, straightforward design, and despite the name it can do many file types. It's excellent for simple cut and paste editing, very much a Linux equivalent of Virtualdub. Why do so many free software projects try to reinvent the wheel rather reuse and improve on the code that is out there? I always thought that was the point of free software.

    • by TypoNAM (695420)
      I have enjoyed using Avidemux on both Windows and Linux, but the only drawback to it is still has, last time I tried it two months ago, audio desync issues with MPEG2-TS (Transport Streams, as in files generated by hdhomerun_config save) which comes to find out that the length of the video and audio are sometimes 5 minutes difference after recording a show for an hour. Yet VLC has no problems at all with such TS files, which got me thinking enough to dig through VLC's source code looking for a possible solu
      • by jps25 (1286898) on Wednesday December 23, 2009 @07:15PM (#30540462)

        This has to do with errors in the broadcast you don't notice when watching.

        To fix it you have to first clean the stream.

        1. projectx to clean it. It's a nice little java program. Just start the GUI, open your file and choose quickstart. You can use the CLI as well
        2. mplex -f 8 -o output.mpeg2 input.m2v input.mp2
        3. manipulate output.mpeg2 with avidemux.

        I've recorded hundreds of documentaries and shows (DVB-S mpeg2-ts), never had sync issues after doing this.

  • by ewg (158266) on Wednesday December 23, 2009 @05:23PM (#30539516)
    ...when news articles contain revision control commands.
  • by RedK (112790) on Wednesday December 23, 2009 @05:49PM (#30539748)

    Despite news that VLC might not have anyone to work on the Mac release

    You mean despite the news that was clarified and proven false by the VLC project the day after everyone in the blogsphere and on tech forums went nuts : http://www.osnews.com/story/22629/VLC_for_Mac_Death_Greatly_Exaggerated_ [osnews.com]

    Why repeat it if it never was true ? It didn't need to be part of the summary at all for that matter, the true story here has nothing at all to do with the Mac port.

  • I'd say it's more pre-alpha.

    I can't take seriously these project properties shown in the screenshot. "30 frames per second"? How do I use 29.97 exactly? 23.976? Where do I setup in the project properties that I want global de-interlacing using interpolation or blend fields or yadif? Or that it's progressive? Where do I tell the editor what the aspect ratio of my footage is?

    And TWO preview panes? This is so last century.

    That UI needs serious love btw, it looks extremely bad. Huge icons on the side of the pre

    • Re: (Score:1, Interesting)

      by zero0ne (1309517)

      Why don't you help out then.

      Don't just sit there and complain on /dot.

      Go over to their site and help code a better UI, post your suggestions, or even draw up some UI images?

  • The FOSS movement needs this type of application. Linux needs to match the same type of applications than run or at least come standard with Microsoft Windows and Apple Mac OS X in order to better compete with them. Since Apple has a video editor built into Mac OS X, Linux needs one as well. As a bonus a Windows port would get the Windows users happy to use a video editor and help them migrate to Linux by using the same software in Windows and then later on in Linux.

    The creative content software that is usu

  • That's what I read when I read VLMC. MC is a bad acronym. It's also is potentially in conflict with Avid Media Composer (MC) which is an editing application.

    Time to go back to the drawing board on that name.

  • This is exactly what both Windows and Linux needs right now.
    In Windows our only free choices apart from the crippled Windows Movie Maker (limited in too many ways) are nightmarish utilities or trial versions of payware (like VideoPad).
    In Linux there are certainly projects out there, but they either seem to have stalled in development, been abandoned, crash all the time, or we're waiting oh-so-patiently for v1.0 to arrive.

    This new VLMC looks like it should really hit the spot. They have a YouTube page with t

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