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Blockbuster Files For Bankruptcy 390

Posted by Soulskill
from the ice-delivery-men-unimpressed dept.
Dallas-based Blockbuster Inc. filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection yesterday, calling into question the futures of over 5,600 stores worldwide. The company will be evaluating each location on a case-by-case basis, and seeks to cut costs after reporting a $558 million net loss last year. Newsweek credits the company's slow adoption of new media distribution methods as a big reason for the company's decline. "... while Blockbuster discussed creating its own subscription service to rival Netflix, it wasn't until August 2004 that its online DVD rental program actually started in the US. And when, in 2004, Coinstar entered the market with its Redbox DVD kiosks, Blockbuster didn't begin installing similar devices until 2008." CNET suggests that "Leaders of pay TV services might be wise to start doing the business equivalent of digging foxholes and manning the battlements or the same thing could happen to them."
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Blockbuster Files For Bankruptcy

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  • I'll miss them (Score:5, Interesting)

    by beschra (1424727) on Friday September 24, 2010 @08:59AM (#33685934)
    Browsing in a browser just doesn't hold up to browsing the physical media. Guess I'm just a library kinda guy.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      Browsing in a browser beats browsing physical media when it contains 100000 times more choices and not only crappy hollywood 'blockbusters'. Guess I am a picky kinda guy.

      • by grumbel (592662)

        Having 100000 times the choice is worth very little when the user interface interface doesn't actually allow you to browse them. The Internet is really good at search, but at browsing it actually just plain out sucks, in a lot of cases it is even completly impossible.

        • by MBGMorden (803437)

          Not really. The browsing experience for movies isn't all that different between the net and brick and mortar. All you get in a video store is a picture of the front and back box cover. You see them small on the shelf and scan over them to see what looks nice. See one you like and you can pick it up and look at it more closely. In a browser you see small thumbnails of the same covers, and if you see one you like you can click on it and look at a larger version. It's pretty much the exact same thing for

          • Not to mention there are reviews immediately on hand that are a lot more useful and illuminating than the vapid praise bytes the film distributor puts on the media case.

            "Absolutely awe-inspiring..." ~Some Newspaper

            Uh huh, yeah, that's what she said. [penny-arcade.com]

    • Re:I'll miss them (Score:5, Informative)

      by MistrBlank (1183469) on Friday September 24, 2010 @09:09AM (#33686058)

      And conveniently these days you can borrow movies from most local libraries.... free.

      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        And conveniently these days you can borrow movies from most local libraries.... free.

        Libraries don't have a very large selection and the condition of their movies can be horrible. I borrowed a Harry Potter from my local library and the thing wouldn't play because it was so scratched up. I don't know WTF people do, let their kids play hockey with the things?! The clerks at the local Hollywood that closed said that theirs was the same way, but they would have a bunch of backup copies - the library doesn't.

        People are so inconsiderate.

      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by telso (924323)

        Don't worry, the RIAA is trying to fix this.

    • Re:I'll miss them (Score:5, Informative)

      by kg8484 (1755554) on Friday September 24, 2010 @09:13AM (#33686092)

      Guess I'm just a library kinda guy.

      Then go to the library. I haven't needed Netflix nor Blockbuster for a good long time. My library is part of a rather large network of libraries. I can go to the library itself and browse available titles and I can also put a hold online for pretty much any movie I want. Yes, I have to wait a bit longer for recent releases compared to a pay service, but I'm patient and there are plenty of older good movies that have zero wait that you can watch in the interim. Now, if you live somewhere where there aren't any good libraries, well, I guess you are SOL. I've never had this problem, but I guess if you live in the boonies it affects you.

      • by Abstrackt (609015)

        Now, if you live somewhere where there aren't any good libraries, well, I guess you are SOL. I've never had this problem, but I guess if you live in the boonies it affects you.

        If you don't have easy access to a library here in Canada, like living in the boonies, there are programs in place for libraries to mail books to you. It's possible something similar exists in the US.

      • Re:I'll miss them (Score:4, Interesting)

        by MMC Monster (602931) on Friday September 24, 2010 @09:59AM (#33686624)

        The other option is that if you don't have a good video complement at your local library, ask if they take donations.

        Many will (baring porn), and maybe you can jumpstart the local library collection. I give many of my old movies to the library and encourage everyone else to do the same.

        • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

          by hairyfeet (841228)

          Not only that, but if you donate often you end up with a nice relationship with the local library and they'll go out of their way to be nice to you. For example my mom has been buying cheesy horror and sci-fi/ fantasy books since the early 50s (while other kids got "the cat in the hat" read to them I got read to from "the best sci-fi writers of" series, very cool) and she has gotten into the habit of giving the library a big box of older sci fi titles when she runs out of shelf space.

          Well it turns out the

      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        In my experience library disks are scratched enough that you will almost never be able to watch the full movie. Obsolete discs should be replaced by streaming...but it's really a waste of library resources when everything is out there on the internet already.
    • Re:I'll miss them (Score:4, Insightful)

      by rotide (1015173) on Friday September 24, 2010 @09:15AM (#33686116)
      I know people see the past through rose colored glasses, but I most certainly won't miss going in and finding that all the good/new movies are out of stock and the hassle of dealing with late fees for things I definitely returned on time. Oh, look at that, they found the copy I had out. Thanks for making me come down and threaten to drop my membership, AGAIN.
    • by mcgrew (92797) *

      Before someone mods the parent "offtopic", the library is my favorite video "store" as well. They don't have the selection a video store has, but checking out a DVD or CD at the library is free. I go to the library first, if I can't find what I want then I'll go to a video store (Family Video; the insanely expensive Blockbuster here closed a year or two ago).

    • by arivanov (12034)

      It is not the digital downloads or pirated content that killed Blockbuster (at least here).

      It is the like of LoveFilm which have 100 times the catalogue of your local BlockBuster branch and can offer it to you for a bag of peanuts over mail order using a "no late fees" model.

    • Re:I'll miss them (Score:5, Interesting)

      by tooyoung (853621) on Friday September 24, 2010 @10:18AM (#33686836)
      I love my Netflix account, but I do find it difficult to make sure that I don't miss movies when they make it out to video. I tend to try to keep an eye out on the New Releases section of Netflix, but even that doesn't seem to work. The other day my friend mentioned he had rented McGruber, and I swear I never saw that listed as a new release for Netflix.

      Netflix's new release section has a problem that I've observed on all other sites that list new releases: the big movies get thrown in the same jumbled mess of a page as all of the latest direct-to-DVD crap, yoga videos, and children's cartoon collections. Sure, I like stumbling upon new movies I haven't heard of, but a lot of the time I just want to see what big releases are making it to DVD. I've yet to find a decent site that ranks new releases by popularity. Any recommendations?

      As much as I will always hate Blockbuster for charging me $250 late fees on single movies back in the day, there was something nice about walking the store and browsing the new releases. You could use the number of copies of a movie to point out the popular releases, and even if you had missed that a movie had come out several months ago, it would probably still be on the wall.
      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by h4rr4r (612664)

        DVDlater.com

        It will let you add movies that are in theaters to your netflix queue.

  • good fail! (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Friday September 24, 2010 @09:00AM (#33685944)

    blockbusters main source of revenue was late fees. all I can say is, goodbye blockbuster don't let the door hit you in the butt.

  • by Pojut (1027544) on Friday September 24, 2010 @09:01AM (#33685948) Homepage

    Goodbye, Blockbuster. With news of your bankruptcy (yes, I know they aren't technically closing all their stores...yet), a bit of my childhood is officially gone.

    Tell me, fellow slashdotters: was there anything better when you were a kid than going to the video store on a friday night to rent a video game or movie? My brother and I rented COUNTLESS NES and SNES games from our local video store (Olney Video)...soooo many games. Good times, good times.

    I recognize how convenient and better services like Netflix and Gamefly are, but there's just something about going into a dusty old video store and browsing the shelves that convenience will never replace.

    • by slim (1652) <`ten.puntrah' `ta' `nhoj'> on Friday September 24, 2010 @09:05AM (#33685998) Homepage

      I recognize how convenient and better services like Netflix and Gamefly are, but there's just something about going into a dusty old video store and browsing the shelves that convenience will never replace.

      If we're going on a nostalgia trip, I want to mention the properly dusty video rental shops that came before the glossy multinational chains stepped in. Thinking of those places gives me a Proustian rush into the 80s almost as much as retro arcade cabinets.

      • by Pojut (1027544)

        I mentioned one in my post :-) Our local shop, Olney Video. It had it all: curtained-off "adult" section, the big clear plastic cases for the tapes, the whole deal. They even maintained a small betamax section!

      • I'm with you. Blockbuster really doesn't have much nostalgia for me, it's the places the preceded shops like that. Blockbuster was cool at first in that it was new, shinier, larger, etc. Once the amazement at a large, clean, video store like that wore off it was just this new place that was more expensive than the place I used to rent videos that it drove out of business. All of my really good rental related childhood memories are from the pre-blockbuster days.
    • by lowrydr310 (830514) on Friday September 24, 2010 @09:09AM (#33686050)
      Wasn't it Blockbuster who ran the mom and pop video rental stores out of business with their corporate muscle?

      Speaking of Mom and Pop video stores, when my favorite local video store was steamrolled out of business by Blockbuster, he fired back (literally) by using half of his store to manufacture illegal fireworks! Every year near the end of June, the video store was packed with customers, until one day a manufacturing accident created a big explosion and a big fire. My brother was nearby when it went down, and said there were rockets flying through the streets, and saw the owner get carried out on a stretcher with lots of charred skin! He eventually recovered, and still makes the fireworks but in a different location.

      Sadly this guy had one of the biggest collections of NES and SNES games I've ever seen, as well as a massive collection of 80s and 90s VHS pr0n that I never got to see (but always peeked behind the curtain to get a glimpse of the box covers); all was destroyed in the fire.
      • by voss (52565) on Friday September 24, 2010 @09:18AM (#33686148)

        Blockbuster was the biggest meanest dinosaur you ever saw...then the asteroid hit. Suddenly being the biggest and meanest didnt matter anymore. All
        the big stores that enabled them to triumph over their rental rivals suddenly became disadvantages over their newer smaller smarter competitors.

      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        by DerekLyons (302214)

        Wasn't it Blockbuster who ran the mom and pop video rental stores out of business with their corporate muscle?

        Yes, it was Blockbuster who ran the mom and pop stores out of business - by actually having new releases available on the day of release (and in quantity, not just one or two), by actually having a deep backstock of movies (and in quantity and across a wide variety of genres), etc., etc..

        I'm tired of hearing crocodile tears for the steam powered "mom 'n pop" stores. As Blockbuster is being

        • by Phurge (1112105)

          I'm tired of hearing crocodile tears for the steam powered "mom 'n pop" stores. As Blockbuster is being taken down by services that better provide what the customer wants, so the "mom 'n pop" stores were taken down by Blockbuster.

          fair point - but there are no crocodile tears for a soulless corporate like blockbuster, in fact, there's more than a little Schadenfreude :-)

      • by MBGMorden (803437)

        Wasn't it Blockbuster who ran the mom and pop video rental stores out of business with their corporate muscle?

        Yep. I remember our local video store well (Video Movieland). Small little place over by the Piggly Wiggly. When a new release came out you had to be there QUICK. They didn't deal in selling old movies, so they ordered however many copies they figured they'd need for the foreseeable future. The biggest new release out they'd typically have no more than 4 or 5 copies. They had their little horror room decorated with fake spiderwebs (probably some real ones mixed in there too . . .) and Halloween stuff.

    • by skgrey (1412883)
      Absolutely. I can't count the amount of times I rented StarTropics and Mega Man for the NES and then Final Fantasy 3 for the SNES. My friends and I would have sleepovers and PRAY for that copy of FF3 to be in for that weekend so we could be up for 24 straight hours trying to play through it, as your save would never be there next time.

      Oh yeah, and ARE YOU LISTENING MUSIC INDUSTRY? Innovate or die.
      • by rjch (544288)

        Oh yeah, and ARE YOU LISTENING MUSIC INDUSTRY? Innovate or die.

        If it's all the same to you, I think I'd rather they skip the innovation and just die. Same goes for most of the major motion picture studios.

        Luckily for me, they seem hellbent on this already.

    • by 0111 1110 (518466)

      We didn't have video rental when I was a kid you, insensitive clod. If it wasn't in the cinema or on television you couldn't watch it. Although some of my friends did have cable TV. And you couldn't rent computer games. You had to either buy one or give a 5 1/4" floppy to a friend and ask him to make you a copy from a game that he bought. Now get off my lawn!

    • by mcgrew (92797) * on Friday September 24, 2010 @09:20AM (#33686168) Homepage Journal

      Tell me, fellow slashdotters: was there anything better when you were a kid than going to the video store on a friday night to rent a video game or movie?

      There were no videogames or movie rentals when I was a kid, kid. I spent my Friday nights at the drive-in theater (in fact I worked at one when I was a teenager). I spent a lot of time at the public library, and in my room with a slide rule and soldering gun.

      I recognize how convenient and better services like Netflix and Gamefly are, but there's just something about going into a dusty old video store and browsing the shelves that convenience will never replace.

      Netflix didn't kill Blockbuster, stupidity did. Here in Springfield the Blockbuster store closed down a year or two ago. They were stupid enough to open right across the street from Family Video and rent new releases for four bucks a day while FV rented them for $3 a week. BB rented older movies for $3 for 2 days while FV rented them for a buck a week.

      Guess what? Family Video is still there, and a lot of FV stores are in town. AFAIK that was the only Blockbuster here.

      Only an idiot opens a store across the street from the competetion and tries to charge higher prices for the same goods. Blockbuster is going bankrupt because their business model is almost as stupid as the record labels.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by forand (530402)
      I too have fond memories of renting video games and VHS tapes throughout my childhood. Unlike you, apparently, I hate Blockbuster. They ruined that. The rental places which used to have interesting titles and japanese import games were displaced by the behemoth that was Blockbuster. They brought nothing good to the equation other than brand recognition. Prices went up, selection went down, and rental policies became more complicated and anti-consumer. I welcome the end to the era dominated by Blockbuster. N
      • by Pojut (1027544)

        We had a local video store (Olney Video) that was amazingly awesome, but the guy moved out of town (when I lived in Olney, there was about 7,000 people within the city limits...now, it's closer to about 40-50,000)...about a year later is when Blockbuster showed up. Since they were the only store near us, that's what we went for. Still, they seemed to understand the small-town mentality, and they catered pretty well to our needs.

        I'd gone to other Blockbuster stores before, and they sucked pretty bad. The

    • I recognize how convenient and better services like Netflix and Gamefly are, but there's just something about going into a dusty old video store and browsing the shelves that convenience will never replace.

      Well . . it was kind of fun, to be sure, but they don't much have what I want to watch, and Netflix does. I've have literally watched every Anime title that they have at the local Blockbuster.

  • The Onion (Score:5, Interesting)

    by oldspewey (1303305) on Friday September 24, 2010 @09:09AM (#33686048)
    Obligatory Onion reference [theonion.com]
  • by MikeRT (947531) on Friday September 24, 2010 @09:14AM (#33686102) Homepage

    At this point, Blockbuster is so far behind its competitors that the only responsible choice is to liquidate its inventory, cut some severance checks and pass on the remaining cash as a distribution to shareholders.

    We're not used to thinking like that, but Blockbuster has probably not a hope in Hell of actually holding its own at this point. Therefore it should do whatever it can to pass along its remaining value directly back to its shareholders before it squanders it on a vain attempt to beat very entrenched competitors who already have mindshare high ground with the public.

    • by Rogerborg (306625)

      That's what they'd do in a communist country like Belgium. In the Land of the Free Enterprise, the purpose of Chapter 11 is for consultants, lawyers and accountants (usually the brothers-in-law of the Board) to strip the carcase of any remaining flesh.

      It seems harsh, but by encouraging them to feed on the weakest of the pack, it keeps them away from healthy companies.

    • by elrous0 (869638) *
      I would offer to provide a good home to the remaining inventory of my local store, but what am I going to do with 100 copies of every Michael Bay crapfest made in the last decade?
  • by Bill_the_Engineer (772575) on Friday September 24, 2010 @09:15AM (#33686112)

    You spend all your time focusing on the mom-n-pop's you're putting out of business, and don't look in the rearview mirror to see RedBox or Netflix.

    Seriously, Blockbuster lost its karma when it used its size to ink deals with movie studios to stock their shelves on consignment with a percentage of the rental fee going to the studios. This allow BB to stock more movies, while the small local movie rental shops still had to purchase their DVDs at the ridiculously high rental shop price.

    • by Thelasko (1196535)

      You spend all your time focusing on the mom-n-pop's you're putting out of business, and don't look in the rearview mirror to see RedBox or Netflix.

      Perhaps the mom-n-pop's will make a slight comeback. There are still a few of them out there, and there is still the nitch of spontaneously renting an old movie that Netflix and RedBox can't fill.

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by TheNumberless (650099)

        There are still a few of them out there, and there is still the nitch [sic] of spontaneously renting an old movie that Netflix and RedBox can't fill.

        Netflix really can fill that niche, though, via instant watch. I really believe (or at least, hope) that the library of movies, especially older movies, available for instant watch will grow to the point that it's competitive with the older titles available in any local store.

    • by interkin3tic (1469267) on Friday September 24, 2010 @10:38AM (#33687108)

      You spend all your time focusing on the mom-n-pop's you're putting out of business, and don't look in the rearview mirror to see RedBox or Netflix.

      Next on the chopping block: gamestop. They did the same thing. They also still have more stores than any reasonable person would think they would need, the result of merging with EB games and closing few redundant stores.

      They've managed to hold their own in the face of competing with walmart etc, mostly through the used console game market. Many of their customers don't bat an eye at selling a game for $5 that someone else would buy for $25. Game developers are already moving in to try to block used game sales with one time use codes and digital content. I'd expect that next generation, most of the big titles will not be transferrable easily and gamestop will really take a hit.

  • It was profitable but not as profitable as they wanted so they moved their money into offshore accounts so they wouldn't have to pay back their debts.

    Tomorrow's stories: Company X buys blockbuster assets for 20 cents on the dollar, fires half the employees. Former blockbuster executive gives millions to charity!
    Happening tomorrow but not in the news: Company X hires former Blockbuster executives; major stakeholders suddenly and unaccountably rich. Major wheeling and dealing between politicians, the IRS, a
  • by andy1307 (656570) on Friday September 24, 2010 @09:18AM (#33686146)
    Netflix Nabs NBC Deal [thestreet.com]

    NEW YORK (TheStreet) -- Netflix(NFLX) announced on Friday that it will expand its licensing agreement with NBC, allowing users to stream prior televisions series from its cable and broadcast networks.

    Netflix subscribers will be able to watch series like Saturday Night Live, Friday Night Lights, Monk and Battlestar Galactica, the company said.

    Netflix has been working over the last several months to expand its streaming content, first through a partnership with EPIX, a joint venture between Viacom(VIA), Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios and Lions Gate Entertainment(LFG) that could add up to 20,000 new titles to Netflix's streaming content.

  • It's really simple - the media landscape has changed and is continuing to change. The internet, literally, changed everything. Companies that think they can get by on the same old, same old are doomed to fail. It might take a couple years or more but, if you fail to evolve when the world around you changes, you will eventually die out. This is true in life and it's equally true in business.

    I have zero sympathy for the companies that are failing due to lack of innovation and evolution. Rest on your laurel
  • Good (Score:3, Interesting)

    by Dan667 (564390) on Friday September 24, 2010 @09:20AM (#33686172)
    A lesson to all businesses that treat their Customers like crap. They screwed me 15 years ago losing a movie I returned, refused to give me the benefit of the doubt, then found the movie and still charged me a huge late fee. I never set foot in another one of their stores. I hope all the blockbuster execs lose their golden parachutes.
  • by sizzzzlerz (714878) on Friday September 24, 2010 @09:20AM (#33686174)

    One more greedy corporation who muscled out the small, neighborhood stores and when they finally became the big kid on the block, squeezed their customers for everything they could. Now, in the light of new technology they're unable to control, they become unable to compete. So be it.

    In the words of airline stewardesses everywhere: B'bye!

    • by careysub (976506) on Friday September 24, 2010 @09:42AM (#33686400)

      One more greedy corporation who muscled out the small, neighborhood stores and when they finally became the big kid on the block, squeezed their customers for everything they could. Now, in the light of new technology they're unable to control, they become unable to compete. So be it.

      In the words of airline stewardesses everywhere: B'bye!

      Indeed. My "venal Blockbuster" story are the sheets of prepaid rental coupons that were suitable for "gift giving". My wife bought some sheets of these to give me as a birthday gift - which I used a few times, and then discovered that they had "expired"! These were not some sort of promotional freebies, not even some sort of discount deal, they were full price pre-paid rentals! And in tiny print on the back of the coupons (not evident in any of their gift promotions) I discovered that they were only good for six months. Having advance use of our money for free, and the bonus possibility that I might lose or forget about them and thus never redeem all of them (common with gift cards) was not good enough for their profit margins - they had to convert a sale into a theft. I didn't use Blockbuster much after that - a great strategy for building your consumer loyalty.

    • by elrous0 (869638) * on Friday September 24, 2010 @10:14AM (#33686788)

      I know it's hip to romanticize Mom & Pop stores over the big evil corporation, but I would like to offer an alternative viewpoint on this one. Does Blockbuster stock mostly crap (i.e. the latest CGI-fests/the latest Adam Sandler movies/etc.)? You bet. But, you know what, all my Mom & Pop's shelved crap almost *exclusively* before Blockbuster came along in the 90's. Blockbuster was actually a godsend to my neighborhood because they stocked a pretty decent selection of indie and lesser-known movies. They may not have had 100 copies of "Ghost Dog," or "Memento" or "Sling Blade," but at least they had a FEW copies. My local Mom & Pop's didn't have ANY of these movies (before Blockbuster and Netflix, there was no way for me to see these movies without buying them). Blockbuster ran my local rental stores out of business for one very good reason, because they were a lot BETTER (no bullying necessary).

      Now, when Netflix came along I went over to them (because they offered an even better selection and didn't censor NC-17's like Blockbuster). But for a long time in the 90's, Blockbuster was the best store out there for film fans in a LOT of neighborhoods and even whole cities. Blockbuster was the only place to go for smaller films, unless you were one of the fortunate few to have a nearby Mom & Pop that catered to indie fans (and those were pretty rare in the cities I lived in, and usually only found near big college campuses and in artier neighborhoods).

      So I'll actually miss them. And I also worry that Netflix might now leverage this to jack up their prices and introduce other heavy-handed customer treatment (since they pretty much have a monopoly now on physical rentals).

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by stewbacca (1033764)

      Let's not jump to conclusions. Bankruptcy proceedings don't mean Blockbuster is out of business (yet).

  • Great! (Score:2, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward

    I'm glad bastards are finished. How many customers they have gouged with false "lost" tapes/dvd/games or "late" fees. Twice they have tried to screw me over and it took months to correct "computer" errors.

  • I view that as trying to protect your existing way of business rather than adapting.

    Digging foxholes is the last thing a country struggling to adapt to new realities should do. It only works if you're large enough to get legislation passed to protect the old ways. (MPAA/RIAA)

  • and companies should adapt to the changes, or die. unfortunately, we have established players from dying media industries still trying to uphold laws that don't work in the internet age

    such media companies should, for anyone who believes in capitalism, adapt, or die. blockbuster is a perfect example of this natural capitalist death

    instead, large entrenched media companies warp the marketplace by influencing the government and our laws to preserve a status quo that should be dying. they'd rather not change.

  • The downfall of Blockbuster was not Netflix or Redbox. It was the operating CEO(s) and investors.
    • by RevWaldo (1186281) on Friday September 24, 2010 @10:48AM (#33687282)
      "This is all your fault!" cried the CEO at the press conference, pointing his finger at the crowd. "We asked you, begged you to rewind, but you wouldn't, you just wouldn't, I... " His voice trailed off, then his eyes rolled back as he collapsed onto the podium, then into a heap on the stage, the toppled-over mics blasting everyone's ears with feedback, then falling silent.

      .
  • I don't pretend to know all there is to know about the video rental business, but I do know the MPAA has a lot to do with making that business difficult. For example, when buying media for rental purposes, they have to spend a LOT more for each copy -- they can't just go to Best Buy to buy their rental copies. And as for being able to move on into newer business models; it's not like they didn't want to or didn't try. I get the feeling that various conditions and restrictions were applied to the deal tha

    • The myth of growth has been hammered into the brains of literally all western business people politicians and to some degree as well into the general public, it is hard to relearn, there is no such thing as unlimited growth and to the worse if you try to enforce it you basically just enforce an only the strongest survive and not even those approach, there is a reason why evolution first followed this approach but at the turning point of introducing the mammals changed to a common goal and group helps eath o

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Maxo-Texas (864189)

      Yea.. because if you are 50+, you should really not be hirable any more. It'd be best if you just go and starve in the wilderness so as not to be a burden on society unless you are successful at carousel and get renewal.

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by Hatta (162192)

      For example, when buying media for rental purposes, they have to spend a LOT more for each copy -- they can't just go to Best Buy to buy their rental copies.

      Sure they can. This is what RedBox does. Blockbuster just pays extra to get their rental copies before they're available in Best Buy.

  • The journalist, MPAA, and RIAA model indicate that when a business model becomes outdated, you solve that not by evolving to compete in a new landscape, but instead litigation and lobbying. Duh!
  • The evil part was Blockbuster versions of DVD's... which had the special features removed.

    The REALLY evil part was that they considered subtitles and captions to be special features.. Rented quite a few dvd's to find out that despite what the box said, there was no captions.

    At least they generally refunded any rental fees.

  • by stewbacca (1033764) on Friday September 24, 2010 @11:02AM (#33687474)

    I don't agree with the last part of the summary saying the cable companies are going the same way as Blockbuster.

    The cable companies MIGHT go the same was as Blockbuster if the cable companies had a serious competitor like RedBox or Netflix. As far as I can tell, there is no alternative (especially for niche interests like mine...soccer, racing, BBC). Sure you can get tv content from online sources, but can I watch Texas vs. UCLA this weekend without a cable subscription? How about Oregon vs. Arizona State? What about the Singapore Grand Prix? How about some English Premiere League soccer or the CONCACAF matches?

    And even if I could get this content that I want on-demand, cheaply and easily, how do I get it to my TV with surround sound? So far none of the alternatives has solved this issue for me.

The world is moving so fast these days that the man who says it can't be done is generally interrupted by someone doing it. -- E. Hubbard

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