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Google To Merge Honeycomb and Gingerbread 158

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the there-can-be-only-one dept.
eldavojohn writes "In Barcelona, Google's Eric Schmidt has been revealing future plans for Google, saying that the next release will merge smartphone and tablet versions of its mobile operating system Android. Aside from bragging about Android's growth, Schmidt tiptoed around a question of Google acquiring Twitter, instead offering the very nebulous statement that YouTube doubled its revenues last year."
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Google To Merge Honeycomb and Gingerbread

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  • Can't they pick different codenames? Makin' me hungry.

  • by Drakkenmensch (1255800) on Tuesday February 15, 2011 @05:00PM (#35214604)
    Will it be sandwiched between delicious silicon wafers?
  • by It doesn't come easy (695416) * on Tuesday February 15, 2011 @05:07PM (#35214680) Journal
    Youtube doubled its revenues last year

    So, was that $13 to $26 or $13,000,000,000 to $26,000,000,000?
    • by santax (1541065)
      I was about to ask, what is minus 289.000.000 when you double it, and is this good?
      • by ILMTitan (1345975)
        How do you achieve negative revenues (as opposed to profit, where negative values make sense)?
      • by MozeeToby (1163751) on Tuesday February 15, 2011 @05:16PM (#35214778)

        Youtube doubled its revenues last year. Emphasis added.

        The statement says nothing about profits, or profit margins; it's entirely possible to make a $1 billion profit one year, double your revenues the next year and suddenly be losing money. In Youtube's case it is probably a very good sign though, since no one really had any idea 5 years ago how to go about monetizing it.

    • Youtube doubled its revenues last year

      So, was that $13 to $26 or $13,000,000,000 to $26,000,000,000?

      Double is double, so return to your toil and stop making trouble.

      • by hedwards (940851)

        Actually it's really important. Revenue isn't the same thing as profit. I might own a restaurant and observe that last year to this I doubled my revenue. I might very well still be going out of business because the revenue might still be insufficient to cover my costs. Which is the GP's point to an extent, doubling from $13 to $26 is doubling, even if it's less pocket change than all the employees put together possess.

  • by TheSeventh (824276) on Tuesday February 15, 2011 @05:09PM (#35214702)
    Shouldn't they focus on something like, oh I don't know, actually Releasing Gingerbread for existing phones, like they said they were doing "in a few weeks" back in November/December?

    No updates, no word from Google about why they aren't sending it out. Looks like things might be falling apart over there.
    • by wsxyz (543068)
      What do you mean? Good DID release Gingerbread for existing phones. They released it to the OEMs.
      Oh, your OEM declined to make it available to you? Too bad...
      • by TheSeventh (824276) on Tuesday February 15, 2011 @05:20PM (#35214826)
        I have the Nexus One, so my "OEM" is Google.
      • by secondsun (195377)

        OP was referring to the Nexus One (Google's phone). Gingerbread hasn't OTAed to the Nexus One yet. In December they said it would be in a few weeks and it has turned into in a few months.

      • You just explained why people are choosing not to code applications for Android.

        • You could have fooled me [android.com]. There's no shortage of developers working on Android software.

          If you want your app to run on everything from $120 Huawei Cricket phones to the Motorola Atrix, Android is your choice.

          If you want your app to be on the most popular smartphone platform, Android is your choice.

          If you decide to forgo being on the platform your customers use because you can't handle compatibility testing, then your customers will decide to become customers of another developer who is less lazy.

          Writing sof

          • I do not view Android developers as my competition, as $92 out of every $100 spent on mobile applications in 2010 was spent on the iOS family of devices. Why would I fight with a legion of other people for what amounts to a much more pitiful market full of people who are cheap and got the generic Android that their carrier tossed in "for free" when I can go for both a more numerous and affluent group of consumers, especially if I need to separately test for "an incredible range of devices?"

            That's just sill

    • Gingerbread is out and has been since December. It's the handset manufacturers that are slow about putting it out on the phones.

      • which is why the Android model of open source is fundamentally broken, imho. But then it was never about the customer.

        • And apparently it isn't about existing users either. No updates and no word about what's going on. Eric Schmidt, their twitter account, and their blog all said 2.3 was coming out in a few weeks, and this was in November/December, and the Nexus One was supposed to be among the first to get it, but it's now the middle of February and Nothing!

          No explanations, no apologies for the delay, just a bunch of hype last year that it was coming out and then silence.

          You'd think a multi-billion dollar global corpo
        • by Facegarden (967477) on Tuesday February 15, 2011 @06:25PM (#35215534)

          which is why the Android model of open source is fundamentally broken, imho. But then it was never about the customer.

          This is such a stupid fucking argument.

          "Oh my god they released in December and it takes months for manufacturers to port to their devices! Android is broken!"

          You don't realize it, but this is the right way to do it. How would you expect it to work? Embedded development takes time, there's no way to avoid that. Even on full PCs there is a delay. Take Windows - they come out with new releases only once in many years, so they can easily delay the release 6 months to allow manufacturers to port their drivers - and thats what they do. Microsoft has a Release Candidate of windows ready many months before they "release", but no one complains about that. If google told us "Yup, the next version is done, so we're releasing to manufacturers and you'll see it in 6 months." people would get just as upset. And it wouldn't make sense to do - some people port faster and can use the new features sooner - so just release all the source and let the OEMs sort it out.

          You could look at Ubuntu - it releases all at once to everything - but then, thats where computers differ from phones. Computers have enough extra space and resources that PC operating systems like Windows and Ubuntu just include drivers for every piece of hardware they can - windows has many hundreds of megabytes of *extra* stuff on the disk just to make sure whatever network card you happen to have will work. Phones don't have all that extra space. Computers are also all built with certain things being constant. Phones have to be highly optimized though, so everything about them varies. The notification lights are hooked up to different pins on the microcontroller, different features on a bluetooth chip are enabled depending on space requirements, etc. All the code for every component has to be ported to exactly how that device is laid out. So far NO ONE has come up with a good solution for building a mobile phone OS that can be universally upgraded without issue. Thats something google is trying to do with Android, but thats one hell of an undertaking. They say Gingerbread includes some features that will help, but dude, this stuff is all new, it takes time.

          So chill out and think about what you say.
          -Taylor

          • they can easily delay the release 6 months to allow manufacturers to port their drivers

            I thought we were talking about updating existing hardware to a new release. In other words, the drivers are already written.

            PC operating systems like Windows and Ubuntu just include drivers for every piece of hardware they can

            These operating systems are released in binary form for generic hardware. The process of building a release for a specific device ought to be much simpler. The hardware is known exactly in advan

          • by Rosyna (80334)

            I have one word that discredits everything you just said: Apple

    • by idontgno (624372) on Tuesday February 15, 2011 @05:22PM (#35214840) Journal

      Gingerbread? 2.3?

      It's released. [android.com]

      Oh, do you mean, "Shouldn't they focus on pressuring Android phone manufacturers and network providers to release their own OTA updates to existing phones?"

      Google don't play that.

      May I recommend Cyanogenmod nightlies? I'm running CM7 Nightly 30 and it's rocking Android 2.3.2 flawlessly on my CDMA HTC Desire. If you're waiting for your network-providing gatekeeping overlords... well, I hope you enjoy waiting.

      • by TheSeventh (824276) on Tuesday February 15, 2011 @05:32PM (#35214942)

        Gingerbread? 2.3?

        It's released. [android.com]

        Oh, do you mean, "Shouldn't they focus on pressuring Android phone manufacturers and network providers to release their own OTA updates to existing phones?"

        Google don't play that.

        May I recommend Cyanogenmod nightlies? I'm running CM7 Nightly 30 and it's rocking Android 2.3.2 flawlessly on my CDMA HTC Desire. If you're waiting for your network-providing gatekeeping overlords... well, I hope you enjoy waiting.

        Yeah, see I have a Nexus One, so I'm not sure how they would pressure themselves . . . ? And with no updates and no word on when it will happen, I figure something must be falling apart over there. Apparently these days, Google doesn't play much at all. But they do like to talk about how much they are doing.

        I'll give it a few more days and then I'll go the cyanogenmod route. I was just being too lazy to want to deal with any quirks or bugs not worked out yet with the nightlies.

        • by idontgno (624372) on Tuesday February 15, 2011 @06:00PM (#35215228) Journal

          Yeah, I saw that you replied to another poster about having a Nexus. My clever post and yours crossed in the mail, I guess.

          Still, most Nexus Ones were HTC-made, so it's probable that Google doesn't have as much leverage as you might think.

          I've had no problems with CM7, after rooting my Desire. Battery life is somewhat better than the stock Android 2.1 that came preloaded.

          So, yeah, I'm fairly happy with the nightlies, but I'm looking forward to when the nice people at CM get a definitive 7.0 official release out there.

          • I know T-Mobile has nothing to do with it and won't support it, and HTC would only support the hardware, so I'm pretty sure it's a Google thing, but no posts on their twitter account and no updates or apologies after they didn't deliver when they said they would makes me think things are seriously falling apart. If I worked there I'd switch over to Facebook too like so many other googlers have done (not to mention the stock options for working at Facebook before the inevitable IPO). Is this why Eric Schmi
          • Google is entirely responsible for the software on the N1 and NS, not the hardware manufacturers. Google uses these phones to develop the OS, so an update for these phones already exists before a new version is ever released to the public.

          • by shutdown -p now (807394) on Tuesday February 15, 2011 @06:57PM (#35215822) Journal

            Still, most Nexus Ones were HTC-made, so it's probable that Google doesn't have as much leverage as you might think.

            The whole point of Nexus One (and now also Nexus S), aside from being "officially rootable", is that they run stock Android with no modifications. HTC was only involved in putting the hardware together for Nexus One; they don't control its software, nor is their participation required in updating it. Not pushing that update is solely Google's fault.

      • Interesting how Apple is also interested in selling more devices yet they still ship updates to their older phones.
        That must piss off the networks but Apple can get away with it because of the limited number of models it has to support.

        • by mlts (1038732) *

          Apple makes money because of the ecosystem involved. It is in their financial interest to keep older devices updated, because it means customers continue to buy from their App Store.

          It is in Google's interest to keep providing updates as well for the same reason. However, the real sticks in the mud are the cellphone makers and the carriers. They hate the thought of upgrades because they don't make money from app stores, only from handset turnover.

    • by mrops (927562)

      Well I still don't have it on my Nexus One, so its not an OEM issue. Of what I have heard, they are doing some changes so Gingerbread 2.3, will release 2.4 so Honeycomb dual core applications run on Gingerbread single core phones. Which is why most OEM are waiting for 2.4 as it takes effort to do their thing before they can release it. They don't want to release 2.3 and then 2.4 just to support apps from honeycomb.

    • by Zebedeu (739988)

      I guess you mean for the Nexus One?

      Apparently they ran into problems, and have been fixing them. This was supposed to be done by January, but it got delayed, and rumours are that it should be out soon: http://phandroid.com/2011/02/16/nexus-one-getting-gingerbread-within-a-few-days [phandroid.com]

      I'm also worried about this, as I just got a Nexus S exactly because I wanted to get updates on time, and the way they treat Nexus One now is a good indicator of how well they'll treat the Nexus S in ~1 year (at least, I hope :-)

    • 2.3 is Gingerbread

      And 2.4 when its out will still be Gingerbread.

  • "of it's mobile operating system Android."
    Please correct to: "of its mobile operating system Android."

    ...And before you call me "grammar nazi", please remember English is not my native language.
    I just feel sad when a website EDITORS disregard the correctness of their mother tongue.
    • by DittoBox (978894)

      English is a stupid language full of exceptions. It took me years to get the apostrophe out of, "its," when used possessively. If we referred to it as, "Google's mobile operating system," it'd be correct. When we use the pronoun we remove the apostrophe while it's possessive, because, "it's," is already a contraction of, "it is."

      We native speakers get it wrong because English—in spite of its advantages—is a language chock full of weird rules that always have exceptions. Not that it's an excuse f

      • At least we don't have to deal with things like "der" "die" and "das". And many languages have dialects that are so different that they almost should be separate languages.

        • by angus77 (1520151)
          Every language has those kinds of arbitrary rules. English has ditched gender, but it sure doesn't lack in arbitrary, crufty complexity when it comes to syntax, irregular plurals, irregular verbs, verbs that mean one thing when they're transitive and another when they're intransitive.

          Even Esperanto hasn't escaped from this arbitrary cruft---the "-in-" bullshit, and why does "brusxi" become "brusxo" while "kombi" becomes "kombilo"? If you can't keep that stuff out of a constructed language, could you hav
      • by angus77 (1520151)

        ...because, "it's," is already a contraction of, "it is."

        Not "because". Otherwise we'd have trouble disambiguating "Google's" (possessive) and "Google's" (for Google is). Just admit the rule is arbitrary.

        ...in spite of its advantages...

        These kinds of statements always bother me. English's advantages have nothing to do with its grammar, syntax or lexicon. It's the de facto lingua franca for science and business right now, but the fashionable language changes every couple of centuries or so, and for reasons that have nothing to do with anything inherent in the language.

        • by Curate (783077)

          English's advantages have nothing to do with its grammar, syntax or lexicon. It's the de facto lingua franca

          The english language is the french language, got it. :)

          • by angus77 (1520151)
            The "franca" in "lingua franca" doesn't refer to French. It was originally italian for "Frankish Language". Frankish was a Germanic language.

            Although something like 75% of the English lexicon comes from French, and even a bit of our syntax.
      • Advantages of English? I know some advantages of Japanese....
      • by arkenian (1560563)

        English is a stupid language full of exceptions. It took me years to get the apostrophe out of, "its," when used possessively. If we referred to it as, "Google's mobile operating system," it'd be correct. When we use the pronoun we remove the apostrophe while it's possessive, because, "it's," is already a contraction of, "it is."

        Ummmm. Actually we don't 'remove the apostrophe' its is the third person gender neutral possessive pronoun like 'his'..... it's its own word.

      • I beg to differ.
        "it's" is a contraction of "it is" all the time.
        "its", however, means that the subject belongs to the referred object, so to speak.

        Generally speaking, all languages are full of weird rules, exceptions and so on. This ain't an excuse, it's (NOT "its") a fact and we have to live with it, because all native languages are organic and have a varying degree of randomness. But if we can't be arsed to learn the mother language properly... well I just think it's kind of sad.
        • by exomondo (1725132)

          "it's" is a contraction of "it is" all the time.

          Except when it's "it has".

          • Ouch. True. The disadvantage of not having English as mother language is on me.
      • There are many silly things in English (just as there are in most natural languages, to be honest), but "its" vs "it's" is not one of them - it's entirely logical and consistent, and easy to distinguish if you understand the difference between the two. I'm actually surprised at how many native English speakers get it wrong repeatedly - in my experience, foreign speakers seem to have a better grasp of it, especially among young people. Perhaps it is because in other languages, the same two concepts are rende

        • by vakuona (788200)
          I read somewhere where someone was arguing that there are 2 English languages, the spoken and the written, and that they may as well be completely different languages. A lot of people for whom English is their first language cannot write it properly. Non native speakers seem to do better, and perhaps that has to do with the fact that they learn both at the same time.
          • by angus77 (1520151)
            Good point. I read once that a real test to see how well a foreign speaker of English knows the language is to see if they use "then" and "than" correctly. A foreign learner will learn the spelling first, and thus will actually pronounce the words differently. If they get to a high enough level of speaking, they will learn to pronounce them the same---and then come the spelling mistakes.
  • by FunkyELF (609131) on Tuesday February 15, 2011 @05:25PM (#35214874)

    Google has promised Android updates will arrive every six months

    Consumers don't care about Google's promise of Android updates unless they actually reach the customers.
    Developers don't care about Google's promise of Android updates for the same reason... unless those updates reach customers developers wanting to target that huge android base need to target the lowest common denominator.

    http://designdare.com/how-to-buy-an-iphone-at-the-worst-possible-ti [designdare.com]

    • by GweeDo (127172) on Tuesday February 15, 2011 @06:19PM (#35215466) Homepage

      Yeah, this whole fragmentation thing is just killing us Android dev's right???

      Or not: http://developer.android.com/resources/dashboard/platform-versions.html [android.com]

      90% of all users that connect to the Market are now on Android 2.1 or greater. Android 2.2 and 2.3 haven't brought any kind of huge API changes that require you lock out 2.1 users to get some awesome new feature. The new "big thing" is going to be the Fragments API and it will support all the way back to Android 1.6.

      Now, don't get me wrong. I want everyone that can be to be on 2.3 yesterday, but it isn't exactly a big deal.

      • by hedwards (940851)

        The main irritation I have with the delays is that there's still functionality in my Nexus One that Google hasn't unlocked.

    • by JanneM (7445)

      Consumers don't care about updates.

      Most people get a phone - smartphone included - and use it. They don't particularly care about different OS versions, follow release announcements or read blogs that obsessively list the changelogs from minor update to minor update. They get their Samsung or HTC or Xperia and use it. If an update comes their way it's something between a delightful surprise and an unwelcome source of anxiety.

      Ask most Android or iOS users and they'll have no idea what version they use. They

      • by roc97007 (608802)

        When a new OS comes out, updates do matter because they solve significant bugs or add significant functionality. As the OS matures, updates become less and less important.

        The update from 2.1 to 2.2 does have some importance to non-geeks because 2.2 has flash support. Even as a geek I'm not sure what 2.3 will buy me if anything, which indicates (at least to me) that we may be getting up on the mature end of the curve.

        Not to name any names -- SAMSUNG -- but the update to 2.2 is important. After that,

      • I heartily disagree.

        The levels of these phones, both Android and iOS, and still pretty new, and therefore lack a lot of desired functionality when compared to computers, Android just recently acquired Flash capability, iOS still hasn't. That's a large part of the internet that isn't available.

        With all the publicity around the phone and tablet releases, people are paying much more attention to OS releases, and feature upgrades. Comments such as "the new iPhone is coming out, but I just got mine 6 mo
    • by Snaller (147050)

      "Consumers don't care about Google's promise of Android updates..."

      Period.

      Consumers don't care. A small group of nerds care. But the big majority don't give a crap. They bought a phone based someone they needed (facebook, twitter, music whatever) - and they are happy with it.
      They don't check for updates every 30 seconds. Nor do they keep replacing the phone.
      They keep it and use it for a long time and are happy with what they have. If there suddenly is an update that is an unexpected surprise - they have no

  • by vlueboy (1799360) on Tuesday February 15, 2011 @06:39PM (#35215650)

    Great... big scary companies that can't earn our trust force us to "sign up" by purchasing their replacements that we did trust. First it was USA banks getting gobbled up, and our diversity perks disappearing after the acquisition. Now, big web companies either create "sign into Yahoo with your Facebook ID" kind of mergers. TFA mentions the twitter question "dodge" very shortly, but to me it counts as guiltily "pleading the fifth"*. When they acquire twitter, they can get data on my habits that I chose NOT to give up when everybody opted-OUT of joining Google BUZZ exactly 12 months ago.

    Youtube refused to let me in with my 4-year old YOUTUBE username to view a video yesterday... apparently they don't care; they want me to sign in with a Google address. Nothing is stopping me from faking data and so on, but nothing will fool their geolocation tracking and their silently associating my video playlists with the content of those emails I receive. Twitter data would provide my outing habits and random data to mine. Eventually it will be a giant single company out there with access to everything, and in the end, we'll have nobody left to trust.

    * amendment of the USA constitution against self-incrimination

  • It sounds quite delicious.

You have a tendency to feel you are superior to most computers.

Working...