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6.6 Magnitude Earthquake Off the Coast of Japan

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  • This gave me the chance to realize that the 'subline' "news for nerds, stuff that matters" has been removed, presumably with the all new design. Right so!

    CC.

  • Not news (Score:3, Informative)

    by brian1078 (230523) on Friday September 16, 2011 @04:22PM (#37424518) Homepage

    Not news. I get notifications from the USGS for EQs 6.0+. They've been having 1 or 2 per month since the big one in March. This is the largest since a 7.0 on July 10.

    • by Kylon99 (2430624)

      I have the feeling a 6.0 - 7.0 is big news in most places in the world, where the buildings can't take that. But in Japan, which seems to be able to ride out 7.0 - 9.0 with not much loss of life, (one lady fell off her balcony in Tokyo apparently... that was it) a 6.0 seems barely newsworthy.

      And of course like the parent poster said; they've been getting one or two every month. It's starting to become a way of life it seems...

      • Also, most of them are happening offshore, which limits the effects. Now, if a M6+ earthquake went off directly under Tokyo, things would be a little more dramatic.

        Now, this is what woke me up the other day (at 5pm local time - jetlag!), a mere 6.2 but much closer to Tokyo than the one in the article, and it was so unremarkable I'd forgotten all about it until now.

  • by formfeed (703859) on Friday September 16, 2011 @04:30PM (#37424570)
    This earth quake comes right after they announced to move to renewable energy. Not a coincidence. The so called green technology isn't so green after all. Each year more people die of shark attacks than get stabbed with a uranium rod. Think about that before you build a hydro dam. And wind energy isn't any safer. While depleted Uranium can be a fun and educational toy, hundreds of houses are destroyed by tornadoes each year. And to store all the solar energy one would have to pave the entire state of Arizona with batteries. Once they leak, everyone in New Mexico would die.
    • by La_Boca (201988)

      top 10 slashdot comments

    • I'm not sure which is funnier, your comment or all of the AC's that seem to be taking it somewhat seriously. :D
    • by Jesus_666 (702802)

      And to store all the solar energy one would have to pave the entire state of Arizona with batteries. Once they leak, everyone in New Mexico would die.

      Even worse: Getting all the solar power from Japan to Arizona and back would incur huge losses so you'd need more solar power and batteries (you might need to pave over Arizona and Utah), not to mention thousands of miles of cables.

  • by rossdee (243626) on Friday September 16, 2011 @04:35PM (#37424598)

    Take the seismologists to court for failing to predict the quake, or does that only happen in Italy?

    • by rubycodez (864176)
      yes, not for failing to predict the quake, just failing to predict the magnitude of the unpredicted quake
  • by Dunbal (464142) *
    Arrest the geologists!
  • Earthquakes were fairly frequent in Japan ...

  • Little creaks happen all the time in that place. Why is it suddenly deemed worth reporting?
  • This is just an aftershock from Japan's big one. It isn't interesting. What's interesting?

    The slight to moderate quakes across the entire US are interesting. The Virginia quake is the biggest; but if you look on the map now you can still see a triangular pattern that covers Oklahoma, Texas and New Mexico. Those are smaller quakes--3 to 4 magnitude. There was one in Alabama too.

    Quakes in that range are not unheard of in the eastern and midwest US; but it seems like there have been a lot more of them lat

    • Will be glad to get 2012 out of the way.
    • by Pyrion (525584) *

      This is why we need to stop relying on the earthquake's peak energy output for determining newsworthy events - deep strong quakes can do diddly squat and yet the idiot journalists see the big number and automatically think it's newsworthy. Rate earthquakes based on how much damage they do, not based on how much energy is released. A 5.0 under St. Louis would be several orders of magnitude more newsworthy than a deep 8.0 out in the middle of fucking nowhere.

    • However devastating, the earth quake earlier this year was not "The Big One" for Japan. The real "Big One" is supposed to hit the land mass that Tokyo is on with a magnitude well over 7. The epicenter will probably be about 100 miles south of Tokio and this type of quake is known in Japan as a "Tokai earth quake". They have had several before and the last one in 1854 caused most of Tokyo to burn to the ground and thousands died. Since Tokai quakes tend to happen every 100-150 years, the next one is due any
  • by drolli (522659)

    ok guys, why not a link to the excellent japanese metrological agency earthquake information in english?

    http://www.jma.go.jp/en/quake/00000000091.html [jma.go.jp]

  • They've had 8 M6+ earthquakes this year. Why is this news? Skylar
    • by blair1q (305137)

      Once the tsunami warning was called off, it wasn't.

      More people need to mod down uninteresting articles in the Recent section.

  • Ok...now i know something is fishy!!
    If you get that size magnitude earthquake, it must be something going on, and my thoughts are that maybe china or korea might be testing their nukes under the water....that would force the tsunamis and earthquakes for sure....

    My next thought is a scary one though, if you could forcibly sink Japan as a whole , then your whole shoreline becomes the mecca for import and trading
    where as now it seems Japan gets a lot of traffic. ...could this be china's way of forcing there be

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