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Publicly Available Russian Election Results Hint At Fraud 304

Posted by timothy
from the or-could-just-be-a-coincidence dept.
gotfork writes "As some Russians protest the results of the recent election, several commentators (Russian), have started looking at the results which are posted to the election commission web site and there's very strong evidence of fraud. Voter turnout correlates strongly with percent voting for the ruling party, United Russia, and there are a lot of polling stations with nearly 100% turnout and 100% voting for United Russia in some unusual places. The raw data is posted so you can do your own analysis."
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Publicly Available Russian Election Results Hint At Fraud

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  • by AdamJS (2466928) on Tuesday December 13, 2011 @10:22AM (#38355420)

    Do they do that at all in Russia? Still, 100%...lol. Putin doesn't even care anymore.

    • by tripleevenfall (1990004) on Tuesday December 13, 2011 @10:25AM (#38355468)

      What, you don't think United Russia would score 100% in Chechnya?

      • by AdamJS (2466928)

        Which is why I said "lol".

        I'm curious as to if they actually got people to vote and just lied (or fudged the numbers or changed the votes afterward) or if they just straight up lied about everything.

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by thue (121682)

        How can anybody (fx Slashdot) would describe 99.51% voting for United Russia in Chechnya as "hint at fraud" instead of the more correct "unambiguous evidence of fraud"? Is Slashdot owned by the Russian dictatorship?

        • by AdamJS (2466928)

          I was just curious as to the intertwining mechanics. No shit it's obvious fraud. Or rather, needs an entirely new term.

    • by Jeremiah Cornelius (137) on Tuesday December 13, 2011 @10:32AM (#38355564) Homepage Journal

      It takes Russia a longtime to catch up. Now they are finally equal to the US in 2000.

      • It takes Russia a longtime to catch up. Now they are finally equal to the US in 2000.

        They're still years away from equaling the US. They may have figured out election fraud, but we hide it much better here. Not completely, but much better.

        • Re: (Score:2, Troll)

          by ackthpt (218170)

          It takes Russia a longtime to catch up. Now they are finally equal to the US in 2000.

          They're still years away from equaling the US. They may have figured out election fraud, but we hide it much better here. Not completely, but much better.

          I keep waiting for the day the GOP has their IPO on the NYSE. Might as well just get it all out there in the open and stop mucking about, begging corporate money for favours.

    • by ackthpt (218170)

      Do they do that at all in Russia? Still, 100%...lol. Putin doesn't even care anymore.

      The Russians did a lot of the same things the Iranian regime did, when they utterly cooked the election so overdone that official counts showed more votes than voters in many cities. Of course, when the people screamed their indignation they beat, kicked, shot and arrested them. Gives you a pretty good idea how ruthless the Revolutionary Guard are about keeping power. After a few arrests and dispersing protesters it's good to see the Russians aren't using the same brutal tactics, to the extent they were

  • by phrostie (121428) on Tuesday December 13, 2011 @10:22AM (#38355424)

    the Elections vote for you!

    someone had to say it

  • by bistromath007 (1253428) on Tuesday December 13, 2011 @10:24AM (#38355452)
    The ad should be retitled "Russia Doesn't Even Bother to Pretend to Have a Legitimate Election." Why would they? It's Russia. Historically speaking, it'd be weird to the point of unsettling if it weren't rotten to the core.
    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      by Anonymous Coward

      The ad should be retitled "Russia Doesn't Even Bother to Pretend to Have a Legitimate Election." Why would they? It's Russia. Historically speaking, it'd be weird to the point of unsettling if it weren't rotten to the core.

      Hell, it seems like every time things start looking up for the Russians, somebody comes in to actively undo everything positive, and crushes them further. I know some guys who defected to the US during the Cold War... they never seem to run out of horror stories to share about how much life sucked there, but what constantly amazes me was that they felt they got out of there before it REALLY went to hell...

  • by elrous0 (869638) * on Tuesday December 13, 2011 @10:25AM (#38355456)

    Look, he's even offering to throw a tea party for all of you with doubts. Drink up!

  • Someone tell me/us about Russian politics. Does it matter?
    For example, here in the US, there is one party, with one set of goals (globalism, imperial global warfare everywhere, war on drugs, tax relief for the 1% and F the 99%, deindustrialize the country, expand the parasitical financial sector at all costs, etc). We have two independent marketing departments that put on a huge show to pacify the population into thinking it matters which marketing department did a better job, D or R. But, it doesn't rea

    • by dhammond (953711) on Tuesday December 13, 2011 @10:58AM (#38355890)

      What Russians are protesting right now is not who gets elected, but how they get elected. The protesters draw from a wide swath of political parties who agree on very little except that they want free and fair elections.

      The truth is that many Russians do think exactly the way you do. My mother-in-law is a Russian living in Moscow. She thinks maybe there was voter fraud, but only a little and not enough to matter. Putin is maybe corrupt, but only a little and look at all the good things he's done! Her overriding argument, though, is that there isn't anyone else worth electing, which is exactly how Putin has managed to arrange things.

      It's easy to be cynical here in America, but we do have real choices and who gets elected does matter. It would matter in Russia too if a real opposition candidate could live long enough to make it to election day.

      • So, step one in the "Becoming a Russian Candidate" process is shoot Putin before he shoots you?

      • by Luckyo (1726890)

        You do? Are you sure? You have a two-party system, completely rigged in favor of corporate elite. The only choice you have is who's lobby will be more powerful for next few years.

        • Just because both sides favor corporatism does not mean that they do not differ in other ways. Corporatism may be the most important aspect to *you*, but not to everyone.

          Moreover, there are factions within each party with different goals. The Tea Party is one example, even if you don't agree with them. Voting for president is never going to be meaningful - the office is representing too many different people. But between your senator, representative, governor, state representative, mayor, and city councilme

    • by rednip (186217)
      Wow, that's a lot of effort for someone that doesn't care. Perhaps you get beaten down for good, but I don't.
  • by korgitser (1809018) on Tuesday December 13, 2011 @10:36AM (#38355624)

    Russians are on the street protesting.
    Americans are on the street protesting.
    Europeans are on the street protesting.
    The middle east is on the street protesting.
    Africa is on the street protesting.
    Dose anyone know a place where people are actually happy with their government?

    • by betterunixthanunix (980855) on Tuesday December 13, 2011 @10:47AM (#38355756)
      Can you name a period of time where people have been happy with their government? In a democracy, politics is about compromise, which means that nobody really gets what they want, and in non-democratic systems of government there is a large group of people who never get what they want. It is fairly rare for people to be satisfied with their government.
    • North Korea (Score:5, Funny)

      by dutchwhizzman (817898) on Tuesday December 13, 2011 @11:06AM (#38356004)
      I don't see any protesters there. It must be the happiest place on the planet.
    • Russians are on the street protesting. Americans are on the street protesting. Europeans are on the street protesting. The middle east is on the street protesting. Africa is on the street protesting. Dose anyone know a place where people are actually happy with their government?

      Corruption Perceptions Index [wikipedia.org]
      Eurozone [wikipedia.org]

      Pick anyone that is high on the first list but not on the second list.

      Granted everyone has their own sets of challenges to deal with.

    • by Pecisk (688001)

      Oversimplified, protests are for different reasons. They are connected, but not fully.

      Russians protest against their leadership don't care about their voice, and what most important - they haven't delivered nothing they promised in exchange. So it has moral and also quite practical basis for Russians anger.

      Americans and Europeans this year protest mostly against *system* - t.i. you can elect different people, they can try to fix it, but in the end system will prevail. See what happened to UK PM Cameron when

    • Well, for most of 2011 at least.

      For those not following the news, Belgium was without a government for the longest time in history, closing in on two years before FINALLY a government formed at the end of this year.

    • Iceland! (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Russians are on the street protesting.
      Americans are on the street protesting.
      Europeans are on the street protesting.
      The middle east is on the street protesting.
      Africa is on the street protesting.
      Dose anyone know a place where people are actually happy with their government?

      Iceland - they nationalised the banks and told the IMF to fuck off.

      They devalued their currency, and their economy is now growing.

      The President and Prime Minister are very popular.

  • WOT is showing that link is "red"...get it...
  • by Mysticalfruit (533341) on Tuesday December 13, 2011 @10:55AM (#38355852) Journal
    So, United Russian wants to make themselves look "legitimate"?

    How is releasing results that confirm blatant voter fraud helping their argument? This is only going to bolster the opposition who'll hold these results up and say "See... see how they fucked us all!"

    It appears to me that Putin and his political machine are if anything, not stupid. They want to stay in power, indefinitely. This does not achieve this aim.

    I can only imagine that there's an angle to this story that my westernized perspective and extremely poor understanding of Russian culture/politics can't quite grasp.

    Please Russian slashdotters... please explain this!
    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by Luckyo (1726890)

      For the record, the only ones "doubting legitimacy" of United Russia are people abroad who really want to doubt it. When you ask people on the street, you essentially have two tiers: those who support it, and those who think that progress has stalled in last few years and they want to shake it up (i.e. protest movement).

      Putin will still get elected, legitimately. According to Gallup he still has ~50-60% popular support in adult population (which is slowly dwindling). His main competition are communists (who

  • ...they'd got Diebold machines in.

  • by jbrax (315669) on Tuesday December 13, 2011 @10:57AM (#38355882) Homepage

    Votes given before the voting started:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QzOXn3wRjJU [youtube.com]

    Here's one with english subtitles:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hLs8kv3u1hw [youtube.com]
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?&v=Hw-5y9fy4zU [youtube.com]

  • by jiteo (964572) on Tuesday December 13, 2011 @11:02AM (#38355942)
    I have family in Russia. One of them told me about their colleague, a woman who's responsible for signing the ballot count. The votes are counted, the Communist Party is a clear winner in that riding, and she signs. Someone from United Russia then brings her a different paper, with the count modified to make United Russia (Putin's party) win. She says "I can't sign this, this is fraud." "Sign it." "No, I can't." "Sign it or you'll lose your job." Her meager salary is already not enough to live on, she can't afford to lose it. So she signs.
    • sheesh. pepper spray too expensive the the russians?

      at least we can show them how we control our OWN people when the gov needs to do a smackdown.

      no need to fire someone; just chemically subdue them if they don't follow your wishes!

  • Looking at the totals at the bottom of the article [samarcandanalytics.com], the fraud would only lower the votes for Putin's United Russia by 6 percentage units. However, this would be enough to make a coalition of the second, third and fourth party larger than United Russia.

  • I think election fraud is more common in Democracies than one would think or, at the very least, attempts are common. One only need point out the Diebold electronic voting machine scandal where a purported "bug" skewed election results in favor of the Republicans. While there is a remote possibility that this was an honest bug, I am not naive enough to believe it. Diebold refused to divulge their code and the machines didn't even have any auditing facilities. It is absolutely ripe for manipulation and enoug
  • by roman_mir (125474) on Tuesday December 13, 2011 @11:43AM (#38356518) Homepage Journal

    Of-course it is all fraud, there are plenty of videos shot during the elections of so called 'carousel' (merry go-round) voters, who were paid to go and vote multiple times in dozens of locations for United Russia. There are cases of just stealing the final results and replacing them with fake pro-United Russia results. There are cases of pre-made voting ballots being thrown into the voting urns, all this is true.

    But after the anti-Putin protest that happened last week, with over 40 thousand people attending just in Moscow (video) Here is a video of the anti-anti-Putin protesters (so pro-United Russia protest), that just happened, and this so called 'protest' was shown on the First Channel (main pro-government TV channel), saying that there were 25 thousand people in the crowd, which is nonsense, but more interestingly what kind of people were there [youtube.com]. In that video the attendees are asked why did they come to this 'protest' and they either don't respond, or they are drunk and respond with pure nonsense, or they barely speak Russian (don't forget, United Russia) and they don't even understand the question well, but they answer that they are here at work or from their work.

    So it's a sham, everything, start to finish (related videos to that one show people being invited to these pro-Putin protests with promises of money). Then there is this video, where people are being paid just after the pro-Putin protest [youtube.com]. A girl in the video says: this is how we sell out Russia.

    Yes, it's a sham.

  • So graze on, graze, you peaceful peoples!
    You will not wake to honor’s call.
    What need have herds for gifts of freedom?
    They’re used to shears and butcher’s stall.

    (Original in Russian here [alexanderpushkin.com]. Could not pass /. junk filter.)

    Sigh. Four years ago, United Russia fraudulently got the 2/3 majority in the current parliament, in the same way, with all the same-looking statistics. This parliament passed, without a contest, some "nice" constitution changes (extending the presidential term from fou
  • by mike449 (238450) on Tuesday December 13, 2011 @02:45PM (#38359404)

    1. Very detailed (down to individual voting stations) voting results were made available, although they were used to do similar analysis after the past elections.
    2. United Russia was barely able to get the majority in Duma, even with all the "irregularities"
    3. Internet was used to organize a mass rally (30-50k people in Moscow, thousands in other places). This one is a first. And these were not radicals that are happy to rally for whatever cause, but middle class - people that didn't go to the streets since 1991.

    This is the first time in a while I have some hope for the future of Russia.

  • by amorsen (7485) <benny+slashdot@amorsen.dk> on Tuesday December 13, 2011 @06:13PM (#38363326)

    In Russia the belief in the secret ballot is so strong that not even the voter gets to see the ballot before it goes in the box.

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