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1 World Trade Center Becomes the Tallest Building In NYC 407

Posted by Soulskill
from the touching-the-sky dept.
darthcamaro writes "On 9/11, terrorists took the lives of thousands of Americans — and removed a pair of icons from the New York City skyline. For the last 10+ years, The Empire State Building was the tallest building in NYC, but that changed today. 'Poking into the sky, the first column of the 100th floor of 1 World Trade Center will bring the tower to a height of 1,271 feet, making it 21 feet higher than the Empire State Building.'"
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1 World Trade Center Becomes the Tallest Building In NYC

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  • by bigredradio (631970) on Monday April 30, 2012 @02:21PM (#39848879) Homepage Journal
    I actually find it interesting and a feat of engineering to have such a tall building. What is up with all the trolls? Get a life you guys. This was a tragic event that should never be forgotten. If there was no mention on Slashdot I would think that someone was asleep at the wheel.
    • by royallthefourth (1564389) <royallthefourth@gmail.com> on Monday April 30, 2012 @02:23PM (#39848917)

      Knock Knock
      Who's there?
      9/11
      9/11 who?
      You said you'd never forget!

    • by Anonymous Coward on Monday April 30, 2012 @02:25PM (#39848939)
      You mean, not forgetting the 3.000 people who died as opposed to the 100.000 who died in the shameless wars after? Fuck you.
      • by Galestar (1473827) on Monday April 30, 2012 @02:43PM (#39849195)
        Why is this marked troll? U.S used 9/11 to justify the murder of far more innocent civilians. It is atrocities committed by Americans around the world that need never be forgotten.
        • by KingMotley (944240) on Monday April 30, 2012 @03:10PM (#39849605) Journal

          First collateral damage in a warfront is usually not considered murder. Also, 86% of the civilian casualties were from those same "innocent" civilians killing each other. Considering that only 14% were actually from Americans -- in a warfront -- I would say the American military did an outstanding job of limiting civilian casualties. Terrorist/Extremists planting pressure trigger bombs in the road, and along comes a civilian does not make the US Military responsible, sorry. Go troll and FUD elsewhere.

          • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

            by Anonymous Coward

            Iraq had an army that was keeping order, preventing the Shi'ites and the Sunnis from killing each other. The US invaded, defeated and disbanded that army. The results were predictable.

            Most of the deaths, though, aren't from being shot/bombed/etc, but from natural causes - exacerbated by the lack of basic utilities and services (water, power, hospitals) caused by the war. If you include those deaths, then 600,000+ extra people died by June 2006 ( article on the Lancet surveys [wikipedia.org] and references therein), or pr

          • by Xest (935314) on Tuesday May 01, 2012 @04:13AM (#39855073)

            "First collateral damage in a warfront is usually not considered murder."

            Yes, except we have mountains of evidence for cases where the damage wasn't collateral, and was just outright murder, or at best, manslaughter due to gross incompetence.

            "Also, 86% of the civilian casualties were from those same "innocent" civilians killing each other."

            Yeah, and I hear 99% of stats are bullshit too.

            "Considering that only 14% were actually from Americans -- in a warfront -- I would say the American military did an outstanding job of limiting civilian casualties."

            Yes, that's why the civilians in Iraq and Afghanistan were so desperate for the Americans to stay, because they'd done such an awesome job of just that.

            No seriously, American military forces are good at one thing - destruction. The fact they just can't handle hearts and minds operations and limit civilian casualties is why they've failed to achieve their objectives in most military actions they've engaged in since the second world war - from Korea, to Vietnam, to Lebanon, to Somalia, to Iraq, to Afghanistan amongst others.

            Anglo-French air strikes in Libya are an example of doing a good job of limiting civilian casualties (regardless of whether you think the action itself was justified).

            "Terrorist/Extremists planting pressure trigger bombs in the road, and along comes a civilian does not make the US Military responsible, sorry. Go troll and FUD elsewhere."

            Well, it kind of does if the whole reason that IED is in the road in the first place is because they were trying to get Americans the fuck out of the country.

    • by i kan reed (749298) on Monday April 30, 2012 @02:36PM (#39849093) Homepage Journal

      I actually don't understand the importance of not forgetting. It seems like a nice enough thing to say, but I want a genuine justification for why it should be remembered, as opposed to mourned and then moved past? I know this sounds incredibly cynical, but I think the United States penchant for remembering tragedies and not achievements is unhealthy for the national psyche in the long run.

      • by gman003 (1693318) on Monday April 30, 2012 @02:46PM (#39849217)

        There's a difference between "remembering" and "obsessing over".

        We still "remember" Pearl Harbor. We still "remember" the Alamo. We still "remember" the Boston Massacre. But I'm pretty sure very few people are still angry at Japan/Mexico/Britain, and I'm pretty sure we're not going to use them as casus belli anytime soon.

        Britain still "remembers" the Gunpowder Plot. France still remembers the Bastille. Both of those events are centuries in the past, yet they are still worth *remembering*.

        There's nothing wrong with *remembering* that these things happened. There *is* a problem with obsessing over it and continuing to use it as justification for everything from invasions to the TSA. For example.

        PS: We *do* remember achievements (the Apollo program, etc), even some we didn't really accomplish (who single-handedly beat the Nazis? We did!).

      • by bigredradio (631970) on Monday April 30, 2012 @02:55PM (#39849363) Homepage Journal
        You make a good point. How many people know the political and economic decisions that led to the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor? When I say we should not forget, I speak generically about not forgetting the past for fears of repetition. We should remember 9/11 in my OPINION as a combination of how building should be built, safety concerns with first responders, our governments (US) habit of arming and propping up power-hungry leaders to play political chess with our enemies. There is an awful lot we can learn from history. I think it is short sighted to just look to the future without learning from the past (mistakes or achievements).
      • by Baloroth (2370816) on Monday April 30, 2012 @02:56PM (#39849381)

        Those who forget history are doomed to repeat it.

        --George Santayana

        That is why. Also, I don't know what history books you read, but the US history books I studied included the achievements too. They just aren't brought up as often (and usually are associated with tragedies, since those are the times when achievements become the most significant).

        • by Oxford_Comma_Lover (1679530) on Monday April 30, 2012 @03:15PM (#39849669)

          Those who forget history are doomed to repeat it.

            --George Santayana

          That is why. Also, I don't know what history books you read, but the US history books I studied included the achievements too. They just aren't brought up as often (and usually are associated with tragedies, since those are the times when achievements become the most significant).

          But leave out the things that cast the U.S. to unfavorably, unless it is politically correct to do so (as with slavery). For example, the British burned the White House, but you'll rarely see a word in U.S. history books about the U.S. burning the houses of parliament in Canada first.

    • by Hatta (162192) on Monday April 30, 2012 @02:37PM (#39849117) Journal

      This was a tragic event that should never be forgotten

      You're absolutely right. The failure of our government to rebuild immediately after 9/11 was a tragic event that should never be forgotten. The new WTC tower is symbolic of nothing more than America's decline.

      • Before you go to crazy... America's decline, compared to the problems in Europe, and Japan?

        China is rapidly growing but it isn't quite there competing with the U.S. and a lot of the problems are finally getting to them too.

        We really don't have much to show that we are in a decline. Yes we are in a big recession, but if you stop whining and get to work it will be over sooner.

        • by Hatta (162192)

          America's decline, compared to the problems in Europe, and Japan?

          Compared to what America once was. How long did it take them to get Pearl Harbor back in working order?

          We really don't have much to show that we are in a decline. Yes we are in a big recession, but if you stop whining and get to work it will be over sooner.

          Yes, if I just work harder that will completely make up for the fact that social mobility in the US is at an all time low. The rich are getting richer, and the poor are getting poorer, bu

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by DigiShaman (671371)

        Amen to that!

        The WTC towers should have been built in the exact same place better and possibly taller. We're a bunch of pussies in this regards. Instead of building the ultimate "fuck you" to them, we instead snivel in a corner and build a bunch of memorials. I'm sorry, but it's not worth all that for 3,000 people. Etch their names in stone someplace else. On the outside, a wall, or insides someplace. But there's no reason to create nothing short of a shrine that only symbolizes cowardice!

      • by rthille (8526) <web-slashdot.rangat@org> on Monday April 30, 2012 @03:25PM (#39849815) Homepage Journal

        "our government" Huh? AFAICT, "our government" didn't own the world trade center. If you happen to live in NY/NJ and you think of the Port Authority as "your government" I guess you could fault it for not rebuilding. But I'm still unclear why the hell a Port Authority would be in real estate to begin with...

      • by Beardo the Bearded (321478) on Monday April 30, 2012 @03:25PM (#39849817)

        "Ladies and gentlemen, I'm afraid there's been a serious misunderstanding.

        "The United States of America is the most powerful nation that has ever existed on this planet. Our citizens spend more on the opening weekend of a movie than the GDP of 40% of the planet. We provide aid in the billions to countries all over the world. We have been to the moon. We can destroy any part of this earth as easily as drinking a cup of coffee.

        *sips coffee*

        "This was the master stroke by a group of madmen who wish to murder civilians in the name of god. We will not be going to war to punish those who have the misfortune of being near these madmen. We know who they are, we know where they are, and will will bring them to justice here in the USA to face murder charges. If they are found guilty in a court of law, they face the death penalty in New York county.

        "In the meantime, we will show you what is meant by 'the most powerful nation on earth'. By the end of this year, we will rebuild those towers and your master stroke will be gone. Yes, those who were murdered are gone from this earth, and we grieve for their loss. But we are America, and we have faced tougher challenges before. You cannot attack us because we will always return, we will never forget, and we will never surrender.

        Good night, everyone."

        -- What he should have said, 11 September 2011

        • Of course, this was G. W. Bush.

          "Ladies. Gentlemen. Mr. Burger. I'm afraid, and I don't understand.

          "America is the most powerful nation that has ever existed in God's kingdom. Our susp ... citizens spend more on the opening weekend of a movie than the ... ga ... gadup ... of 40$ of the planet. We provide AIDS to Africa. We are going to shoot down the moon, and we will sip coffee there.

          *wipes coffee from tie*

          "I masterfully stroked off a group of madmen.... God will murder the civilians. We are going to war! We know who you are, and we are going to punish you by bringing you to the USA. If you come to New York County, you are guilty, and we will charge you with the death penalty. Heh, heh. Just like Texas. String 'em high!

          *realizes where he is*

          "Ahem ... In the meantime, we are the most powerful nation on earth. By the end of this year, we will be gone, and you will stroke your towers. Never forget ... uh ... never! ... Never surrender! <approval-seeking grin> You cannot attack us, because we have tougher challengers, who murdered, and then left Earth for the Moon. Guess that's why we're shooting it down. We are America!

          "Good night, Mr. Cheney."

    • by l0ungeb0y (442022) on Monday April 30, 2012 @02:39PM (#39849141) Homepage Journal

      Why shouldn't this be forgotten?
      I think it's high time we got over it.

      I also think it's high time we got rid of the Patriot Act and the TSA
      -- Like that would ever happen --

      So go ahead shrieking "9/11 NEVER FORGET!" To remind us how we let the terrorists win.
      Because they did.

      Try not to feel like a criminal the next time you undress yourself at the airport while waiting in line to get your nads zapped with a healthy dose of radiation.

    • by TheCarp (96830) <sjc@cGINSBERGarpanet.net minus poet> on Monday April 30, 2012 @02:44PM (#39849199) Homepage

      Yes being 21 feet taller than the tallest building in that city must have added so many huge technical challenges. Sure its impressive, but this isn't about impressive technical challenfes, its a nationalist hooray for us. Its drivel.

      9/11 was a tragic event, but never forgotten? Why? what does remembering it teach us? I don't see any important lesson in it. Bad shit happens? Sometimes a few dedicated people will fuck shit up for other people?

      Much more to remember is peoples terrible overreactions which continue to this very day. 9/11 was pretty forgetable compared to the backlash it caused. Compared to the massive expansion of govenrment securituy apparatus, compared to the exercises in airport security theater? Meh, 9/11 itself was just a few guys bringing some buildings down and killing a bunch of people.

      There really isn't very much impressive about it, it wasn't even a repeatable strategy, as before the day was out. The ONLY reason it worked in the first place was because passengers were expecting a normal "hostage situation" hijacking, where it made sense to stay in their seats and wait for the situation to be resolved. By the end of the day the whole plan was useless to try again.

      • by Baloroth (2370816)

        There really isn't very much impressive about it, it wasn't even a repeatable strategy, as before the day was out. The ONLY reason it worked in the first place was because passengers were expecting a normal "hostage situation" hijacking, where it made sense to stay in their seats and wait for the situation to be resolved. By the end of the day the whole plan was useless to try again.

        So, what you are saying is that it isn't a repeatable strategy because people remember what happened last time? Interesting.

        Yes, I get your point about the security theater, and agree. Personally, I think the terrorists succeeded beyond their wildest dreams because of that, but that still doesn't mean we shouldn't remember the attack.

      • by peragrin (659227)

        It isn't done yet they have another 500 feet to go for its planned height.

        This is merely the milestone of becoming the tallest building in NYC since the towers fell.

        If you want to rant ask why 1776' instead of 2001' or even one foot for every person who died.

    • by Bill_the_Engineer (772575) on Monday April 30, 2012 @03:12PM (#39849641)

      This was a tragic event that should never be forgotten.

      Yet April 19th came and went without a mention. On April 19, 1995, the Alfred P. Murrah Building was destroyed when 4 American terrorists exploded a cargo van full of explosives. 169 people died including 19 children under the age of 6 and over 680 people were injured.

      People said we shouldn't forget the Oklahoma City bombing... yet we did...

  • by crazyjj (2598719) * on Monday April 30, 2012 @02:22PM (#39848907)

    Stupid bickering between the city and developers kept the World Trade Center an embarrassing hole in the ground for over 9 years. This building should have been finished years ago.

    • Don’t forget the insurance companies. The way policies are written, equivalent buildings would have to been built. Which means, basically building new towers over the sites of the old ones (insensitive on so many levels) and not fixing the road layout.

    • by cpu6502 (1960974) on Monday April 30, 2012 @02:31PM (#39849039)

      Yep. Should have just dusted-off the old WTC schematic, made a few tweaks to modernize the internal skeleton, and then rebuild the whole damn thing again. Plus add a temporary middle finger to the top, aimed towards Mecca.

      "You destroy it; we'll rebuild it. You destroy it again; we'll rebuild it again. And again and again." Just like the Senate and People of Rome. They lost 3 navies before finally crushing Carthage. They refused to give up.

      • by gman003 (1693318)

        There was a proposal back in 2001 to rebuild them with one extra floor: a mosque, as both a "you can't attack us without destroying one of your own holy places", and as a "we did not let the actions of a few extremists turn us against an entire religion".

        Unfortunately, today, even trying to build a mosque several blocks away from the rubble causes a massive uproar, so I think we must have rolled a one on our "save vs. intolerance" roll...

        • There was a proposal back in 2001 to rebuild them with one extra floor: a mosque, as both a "you can't attack us without destroying one of your own holy places", and as a "we did not let the actions of a few extremists turn us against an entire religion".

          Unfortunately, today, even trying to build a mosque several blocks away from the rubble causes a massive uproar, so I think we must have rolled a one on our "save vs. intolerance" roll...

          Rather, the terrorists rolled a 20 on their "save vs get America to destroy itself from within" roll.

          Critical hit.

      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by darkmeridian (119044)

        The problem was that the WTC schematic was inherently not as secure as the new tower design. The Freedom Tower will have a concrete-reinforced base to protect it against car bombs, reinforced staircases and sprinkler systems (which all shut down after the "core" of the original buildings were severed by the planes on 9/11, leading to uncontrolled fires above the impact area), more staircases with dedicated staircases for firemen (on 9/11, firemen going up slowed people going down, leading to many casualties

  • This has been all over the news, but I just don't see how it warrants all the attention. The real story is what held up construction on the new tower.

    • by game kid (805301)

      There was much coverage of it on local TV over the years--enough that I sometimes wanted to throw a rock and say "Shuddap and build it already!"

      The floor-every-week build pace seems to make up for it, but I worry that will make the towers that much more fragile.

    • I am willing to give the mountains of political crap a pass in this case. I believe everyone involved saw the necessity of getting every last detail right.
      This site through duty, not choice, has changed from a symbol of economic prominence to an iconic symbol of free men everywhere.
      If it stands for eternity, it won't be long enough.
  • Took way too long. (Score:5, Insightful)

    by cpu6502 (1960974) on Monday April 30, 2012 @02:26PM (#39848957)

    Almost 11 years to build a building. Nuts. The Empire State was built in just 2.5 years using primitive 1920s technology, and the first WTC in the same amount of time.

      I think the long dragout time is symbolic of how America has lost its ability to get things done in a quick fashion. (And why people turn to India or China or Russia instead.) Too much bureaucracy and second-guessing and twiddling of thumbs.

    • by Anonymous Coward on Monday April 30, 2012 @02:45PM (#39849211)

      Almost 11 years to build a building. Nuts. The Empire State was built in just 2.5 years using primitive 1920s technology, and the first WTC in the same amount of time.

      The original WTC was planned in 1958 and the dedication ceremony was in 1973. Groundbreaking was in 1966.
      8 years planning and re-planning, 7 years building.* Roughly similar to the current WTC project.

      Wikipedia:
      In 1958, Rockefeller established the Downtown-Lower Manhattan Association (DLMA), which commissioned Skidmore, Owings and Merrill to draw up plans for revitalizing Lower Manhattan. The plans, made public in 1960, called for a World Trade Center to be built on a 13-acre (53,000 m2) site along the East River, from Old Slip to Fulton Street and between Water Street and South Street ...
      After a year-long review of the proposal, the Port Authority formally backed the project on 11 March 1961.[11] ...
      In March 1965, the Port Authority began acquiring property at the World Trade Center site.[72] The Ajax Wrecking and Lumber Corporation was hired for the demolition work, which began on 12 March 1966 to clear the site for construction of the World Trade Center.[73]
      Groundbreaking was on 5 August 1966,

      The topping out ceremony of 1 WTC (North Tower) took place on 23 December 1970, with 2 WTC's ceremony (South Tower) occurring later on 19 July 1971.[79] The first tenants moved into the North Tower in December 1970, and into the South Tower in January 1972.[91] The buildings were dedicated on 4 April 1973; Tobin, who had resigned the year before, was absent from the ceremonies.[92]

    • To be fair, a lot of the problem is they built the thing on a graveyard.

      In context, 11 years is pretty good time for building a giant skyscraper on the final resting place of a few thousand people who all still have plenty of living relatives.

    • by MightyYar (622222)

      Almost 11 years to build a building. Nuts.

      Yeah, we should do things in a hurry and without plan or democratic process.

  • Get ready for a remake of Escape from New York.
  • I think a 1,300' tall office building shaped like Maurizio Cattelan's L.O.V.E sculpture -- preferably in gold -- would have been both a National Symbol of defiance against those who would harm us and a proud display of the typical NYC manner of greeting.

  • If it's not habitable, it's not a building, per se, ie, it's not "the tallest building in NYC".

    Maybe the tallest non-supported construct. Tallest building is many months off.

    NOT news for nerds btw. I've been doing drafting and architecture for over 20 years,
    this is just NEWS. If we start 'building out' the definition of nerd... we're are just going
    to have to call this a "news site". You can't say there are "nerds" in every occupation,
    where are the molecular gastronomists? That's nerdy. Where are all my tune

    • by WilliamBaughman (1312511) on Monday April 30, 2012 @02:50PM (#39849283)

      Clearly Slashdot is news for the kind of nerd who nerds out about what kind of news is for nerds.

      I come to Slashdot because every once in a while I find one insightful, useful comment that changes my whole understanding of a technical issue. Because the timing and location of those comments are unpredictable and they occur seemingly at random the great "comment hunt" triggers all of the same mental processes as a gambling addiction. So, Slashdot is essentially an Internet slot machine, and they payout is in obscure knowledge. Also, I'm used to the green color, that doesn't hurt.

      • Because the timing and location of those comments are unpredictable and they occur seemingly at random the great "comment hunt" triggers all of the same mental processes as a gambling addiction. So, Slashdot is essentially an Internet slot machine, and they payout is in obscure knowledge. Also, I'm used to the green color, that doesn't hurt.

        So, Slashdot is essentially an Internet slot machine, and they payout is in obscure knowledge. Also, I'm used to the green color, that doesn't hurt.

        Dammit... is that why I keep coming back? Darn these addictions.

        -AI

    • by Animats (122034)

      If it's not habitable, it's not a building.

      That's actually the rule on "tallest building". The Ryungyong Hotel [wikipedia.org] mess is the reason for that.

      Of course, Burj Khalifa [wikipedia.org] is the tallest building in the world, and by a big margin, over 300 meters.

  • It took me years to adjust to the towers not being there. While I was still in high school, only a few blocks from the site, the bare foundation became a part of what was normal and it was incorporated into my sense of home. After graduating, I left New York. Whenever I returned, I saw the foundation, and it was still a part of home, a part of New York that was the same whenever I visited. When I returned last year, it was startling to not see the bare foundation, and see a building under construction.

  • From Wikipedia:
    "and with its antenna spire included, it stands a total of 1,454 ft"

    All they've put up at the site is a couple of girders marked 1271 ft. -- That is NOT "tallest in NYC" if those girders aren't any more habitable than the radio antenna atop Empire State.

    This 'news' is total "feel good" PR bullcrap.

    And, the Empire State Building has stood for more than 70 years. Top that, newbies.

  • I mean, isn't it going to be both a bit creepy and scary?

    You've got the memories of all the people who died next door, and if there's one thing that would get a terrorist excited it would be the idea of knocking down the tower *again* after we went to the trouble to rebuild the thing.

    You're going to need one heck of an immunity to superstition and a lot of faith to not at least consider these things.

    I'm really curious to know how much occupancy they have lined up and whether the rates reflect any of this.

    G.

  • This would have been a cool set of buildings on any other site. As a replacement for the WTC it's kind of lame. I wouldn't the buildings rebuilt has they'd been. But I would have liked something comparable. Perhaps the twin towers had a high vacancy rate and they saw no way of filling all that space?

    It is extremely embarrassing to see how long it took to get the building to this point. As others have mentioned it speaks to the sad state of affairs in this country. Almost anywhere else it would have taken a

  • by Anonymous Coward on Monday April 30, 2012 @02:57PM (#39849391)

    It seemed to be barely moving for months but this spring they must have really picked it up a notch because suddenly it's been growing fast! To me the old WTC is so reminiscent of the dotcom days. I had just moved to NYC and was for a small tech firm. Always loved perusing the O'reilly books at the WTC Borders on some down time. Nice to see them finally bringing it back, definitely gives me some optimism even if the USA and the world will never be the same again. But better or worse I'm packing up and heading to the west coast next year anyways. If you're not working in finance or maybe some wing of the entertainment industry there's nothing for you in New York anymore. All that crap about "Silicon Alley" is just hype. The only people hiring are hedge funds who want some kind of shady derivative algorithms coded up...but anyways, at least the WTC is back in one form or another.

  • by Skapare (16644)

    And it's already rusting.

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