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Sandy Sinks HMS Bounty, Knocks Off Gawker Websites 238

Posted by timothy
from the stormy-weather dept.
Black Parrot writes "Several news sites are reporting that the 1962 replica of the HMS bounty was lost at sea due to hurricane Sandy, about 90 miles off North Carolina. The latest news I find says 14 of 16 crew rescued, one drowned, and the Captain still missing." And on land, the combination of wind and water surges knocked off Gawker sites and the Huffington Post for a time, and forced the evacuation of NYU's Langone Medical Center. Did it affect you?
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Sandy Sinks HMS Bounty, Knocks Off Gawker Websites

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  • by Seeteufel (1736784) on Tuesday October 30, 2012 @09:54AM (#41817203) Homepage
    And the Huffington Post is still down! I wonder what sea water flooding implies for the financial district.
    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by squiggleslash (241428)

      And the Huffington Post is still down!

      Leading to the number of complaints about slowness and memory usage at Firefox's bugzilla to be _way_ down...

      I wonder what sea water flooding implies for the financial district.

      That today would be a great day to float your business on the stock exchange?

    • by M. Baranczak (726671) on Tuesday October 30, 2012 @10:05AM (#41817347)

      I wonder what sea water flooding implies for the financial district.

      1. A brisk day of trading in derivatives based on underwater mortgages.

      2. A vindication of the Saltwater school of economics.

    • I wonder what sea water flooding implies for the financial district.

      NASDAQ is testing their systems, now. The exchanges do not seem to have suffered significant damage. The problem is going to be transportation; the exchanges may open tomorrow, but the markets will not be able to function properly if people can't get to their jobs in the financial district.

    • by bobstreo (1320787)

      And the Huffington Post is still down! I wonder what sea water flooding implies for the financial district.

      Looks like they sort of tried on Wall Street:
      http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/data?pid=avimage&iid=iB520MWRNVP8 [bloomberg.com]

    • Re:Huffington Post (Score:4, Insightful)

      by cruff (171569) on Tuesday October 30, 2012 @10:16AM (#41817521)

      And the Huffington Post is still down!

      And nothing of any value will be missed while it remains down.

      • And the Huffington Post is still down!

        And nothing of any value will be missed while it remains down.

        Except we'll be forced to resort to Drudge for news.

    • by bluescrn (2120492) on Tuesday October 30, 2012 @10:44AM (#41817921)
      "I wonder what sea water flooding implies for the financial district."

      Bankers need bailing out again...
    • by ncc74656 (45571) *

      And the Huffington Post is still down!

      ...and nothing of value was lost. :-P

  • last post (Score:2, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward

    for the good cap'n.

    but what they were doing bobbing around in the path of frankenstorm i don't know.

    • probably trying to avoid the storm surge...

    • Re:last post (Score:4, Informative)

      by CimmerianX (2478270) on Tuesday October 30, 2012 @10:08AM (#41817403)
      It's very dangerous for a ship to be in port for a storm like this. Getting out to sea and out of it's path is the proper course of action. It just couldn't get out from in front of it's path quickly enough. And unlike newer ships that can withstand storms, a tallship like that didn't stand a chance.
      • Re:last post (Score:5, Insightful)

        by BenJury (977929) on Tuesday October 30, 2012 @10:21AM (#41817611)
        Safer for the ship to be at sea instead of docked, safer for the crew to be docked rather than at sea...
      • by Ogive17 (691899)
        From what I read earlier, sounds like the ship was doing fine (given the circumstances) until the generator went out and they were no longer able to pump water out from the hull.

        Even though it was a replica, I've always loved that style of ship. It's especially sad that 1, possibly 2, crew members lost their life.
      • Re:last post (Score:4, Interesting)

        by Fox_1 (128616) on Tuesday October 30, 2012 @02:51PM (#41820959)
        The Bounty left port a week before the storm. The captain's stated intention was to skirt around/through the storm and head south. Let me repeat. The captain intentionally sailed into Sandy.
        There was a plenty of warning of the scale and scope of this storm before the Bounty left port. This wasn't a case of it being caught unprepared in harbour with a hurricane bearing down on it trying to get to sea. This captain made a decision to put this ship into incredible danger. A ship which is 400 years out of date in technology and used as a school ship to teach sailing.
        This was not the right decision.
    • by v1 (525388)

      but what they were doing bobbing around in the path of frankenstorm i don't know.

      You've got very little if any control over where your boat goes in a storm like that. If you're anywhere near the coast, there's very good odds you're going to end up on the rocks. (or in the street, or on top of the building, etc) Just look at the tsunami in japan, all the boats that were shoved inland.

      Best thing they can do is get the boat out as far as possible away from anything it can get tossed into. But for a ship of

      • by vlm (69642)

        I don't understand why they didn't set sail sooner, even with a tow to speed it up.

        This is what sunk them. Safest place to be when a hurricane smashes into your home port, is 500 miles away on a sunny beach sipping a margarita. Even just 150 miles off to the side in a really bad rainstorm is better than right in the path of the hurricane.

        I've personally done this on a much smaller scale with thunderstorms on a sailboat. Both the distances and warning times are shorter by about the same fraction.

        • by H0p313ss (811249)

          I don't understand why they didn't set sail sooner, even with a tow to speed it up.

          This is what sunk them. Safest place to be when a hurricane smashes into your home port, is 500 miles away on a sunny beach sipping a margarita. Even just 150 miles off to the side in a really bad rainstorm is better than right in the path of the hurricane.

          I've personally done this on a much smaller scale with thunderstorms on a sailboat. Both the distances and warning times are shorter by about the same fraction.

          Right, so why was he sailing to Florida? If it had been me I'd have been running her northeast *away from the storm* as fast as I could go.

      • Re:last post (Score:5, Informative)

        by Panaflex (13191) <convivialdingo@NospAM.yahoo.com> on Tuesday October 30, 2012 @10:45AM (#41817925)

        According to news reports, the engine broke down and they were not able to repair in time.

        • by v1 (525388)

          According to news reports, the engine broke down and they were not able to repair in time.

          Gotta love it when your sailboat suffers an engine breakdown... (I wonder if any of their crew even knew how to operate sails?)

          But like I said before, they should have had a tug or some other vessel helping them out. I wonder if there were any naval destroyers or other military vessels hanging around that could have tossed them a rope?

          • by iamhassi (659463)
            Could be the other vessels were busy with other boats, or maybe they didn't know the engine was bad until it was too late to call other vessels for help since I'm sure they were all heading out to sea too
          • by PortHaven (242123)

            To concur and re-emphasize... sails in a storm like that become shreddeds ribbons. At most you'd run a single jib of mizzen sail, and that likely reefed, in order to keep the vessel bow/stern to waves.

            The problem is that the ship was taking on water, and with the engine/generator down. There was no way to pump it out. Ships like this of old had a full compliment of crew. (ie: 50-100). That's because they were working vessels. And many of those crews were used to perform a variety of tasks. Modern day ves

      • by Synerg1y (2169962)

        I wonder if this has anything to do with the ship being a replica, and the crew probably working for Disney :)

  • by MyLongNickName (822545) on Tuesday October 30, 2012 @09:56AM (#41817229) Journal

    I have no way of getting on the internet.

    • by wvmarle (1070040)

      Who needs the Internet when you have Slashdot?

  • Missing? (Score:5, Funny)

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday October 30, 2012 @10:00AM (#41817271)

    Yeah, sure, the Captain of the HMS Bounty is "missing" because of a "hurricane".

    We've heard that one before.

  • by Rosco P. Coltrane (209368) on Tuesday October 30, 2012 @10:01AM (#41817275)

    and the Captain still missing.

    You'll find him adrift on the ship's boat somewhere in the Pacific I expect.

  • by dkleinsc (563838) on Tuesday October 30, 2012 @10:01AM (#41817281) Homepage

    The latest news I find says 14 of 16 crew rescued, one drowned, and the Captain still missing.

    The captain is missing ... perhaps somebody mutinied?

    • by crazyjj (2598719) *

      The part of Fletcher Christian will now be played by Tom Hardy.

      • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

        by Anonymous Coward

        The woman who dies was decended from Fletcher Christian, and Capt. Robin still hasn't been found. Those of us who live and work on these boats are still hoping to find a long loved and respected member of our community. As far as the Captain's experience, the coast guard went to him for the sail training program for the Eagle.

    • by vlm (69642)

      The latest news I find says 14 of 16 crew rescued, one drowned, and the Captain still missing.

      The captain is missing ... perhaps somebody mutinied?

      Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home. The problem was Kirk self destructed the enterprise while the klingon boarding crew was aboard. The captain is in the volcano. Yes, if you look close as a joke the starfleet crew did rename the BoP "The Bounty". By far the strangest part of the movie plot was how starfleet kind of abandoned them on Vulcan. Sure you stole/borrowed and then destroyed a ship, then almost started a war, then hung around an exploding planet, then stole a klingon ship, then resurrected a dead s

  • The original HMS Bounty didn't have the benefit of knowing a week in advance when a hurricane was coming. This one did. WTF were they even at sea for? Unless this was a suicide run, that was pretty fucking stupid.

    • by drinkypoo (153816)

      This is what I came in here to say, too. They had lots of time to get the hell out of the whole damned region.

    • Safer at sea than at port - though I saw mention that they were in dry dock very recently, which might be safer than either other option. The stupider part though was that they didn't sail due East to get away from the storm, but instead tried to sail South towards their destination in Florida (after going only a little bit East to try to avoid the storm).

      • Safer for the ship, of course, not the crew.

      • by compro01 (777531)

        The stupider part though was that they didn't sail due East to get away from the storm, but instead tried to sail South towards their destination in Florida (after going only a little bit East to try to avoid the storm).

        Until Thursday, the storm was expected to go East off into the Atlantic after wrecking Cuba and Haiti. It was until the 11am Thursday forecast that it was expected to make landfall in New Jersey. At the speed they would be going and given how damn big Sandy is, I don't think going East at that point would have made any difference except putting them further from help.

    • by Nidi62 (1525137) on Tuesday October 30, 2012 @10:17AM (#41817547)
      Ships are designed to be at sea, not alongside a dock. In severe storms, boats are often able to more easily weather a storm in the open water than at a dock or in shallow water, where they are likely to bump into things, which rarely ends well for the ship. From what I understand, the Bounty was out and trying to skirt along the edge of the storm, but the waves were so high that they took on too much water. The whole crew had on life jackets and survival suits, but the Captain and th sailor that drowned were swept overbaord while getting on a life raft. So they were prepared to ditch.

      And for an example of why being at sea is better, Good Morning America showed footage this morning of a tanker that had been tied of at a dock in New York. The storm broke it free, carried it several miles, and beached it to where about half of it is on land. This was a modern ship with a metal hull, but it's safe to assume the hull took at least some damage when it beached. Now imagine what would have happened to a larg wooden hulled vessel that got smashed up against it's pier, or beached on some rocks.

    • by DarkOx (621550) on Tuesday October 30, 2012 @10:19AM (#41817573) Journal

      The original bounty would have pumps that would have been operated manually by gangs of sailors. Wood hauled ships of that type are pretty much in a constant state of sinking, you must pump the bilge.

      The replica bounty was equipped only with electric pumps They had some kind of generator failure and could not run them.

      What were they doing at sea. Its pretty much SOP of an ocean going vessel of any significant size to put to see ahead of storm. I hope its obvious to you why being anchor in heavy sees would be a problem. Since you can't be tied up you don't want to be anywhere near shallow water or anything like pier, rock, other ship, etc you might be pushed against.

      So what you generally do is you try to sail out into deep open water, and avoid the storm as much as possible. This is the safest thing to do for the ship. Obviously you don't head strait into the storm, but this thing was so big they could not easily avoid even the worst of it; given their best possible speed.

      So yes the original HMS Bounty and her crew probably would have survived this storm, although its likely some top men would have been killed trying to reef sails in heavy wind and sea. The replica with her mechanical dependencies and crew we value more than the vessel was not up to it.

    • by vlm (69642) on Tuesday October 30, 2012 @10:34AM (#41817789)

      WTF were they even at sea for?

      Ships (usually) move a lot faster than houses, so you simply sail out of the way... unless you have an equipment failure during the escape. Then you sink/die of course, because suddenly you're stationary. Its almost impossible to sink a boat that's underway in the modern radio era, even if its an ancient replica. Safest place to be when a hurricane is on the way is on a ship, because in about 12 to 24 hours you'll be somewhere sunny and pleasant instead of in a hurricane, and if you get a couple days warning that is not too difficult to get 12 hours away... I used to get endless shit from landlubbers when I was serious contemplating doing the liveaboard sailboat thing about hurricanes "What'll you do when a hurricane hits your harbor" "Probably drinking a margarita sitting on a sunny beach 300 miles away, what are you going to be doing when a hurricane hits your home city?" "Grr..."

      I was a real small time sailboat sailor but even I know their "killer" (literally) mistake was not traveling in a convoy. So the mainmast snaps off or you spring a hopeless leak, who cares, everyone move from boat #4 to boat #27 and we'll continue along the way. Its more fun to sail in a group of friends anyway. Probably they were too scared of low visibility to escape in a group, if the odds of collision are 2% in heavy seas and dense fog, and the odds of sinking are 0.001% then you go it alone. In slashdot IT terms this is a Redundant Array of Inexpensive (LOL) Sailboats, but if its foggy you'll get massive filesystem corruption.

      In all honesty quite a few "killed by hurricane" stories are REALLY "killed during hurricane" stories that have nothing to do with the weather, they'd be just as dead without the storm. Very few sailors are killed by hurricanes compared to landlubbers I'd feel much safer on a boat than on land.

      Until they come out with a formal report we won't know what happened, but I'm guessing they were doing a hell of a lot better than the landlubbers until something very critical failed in an unanticipated manner.

    • During a storm, ships are far safer at sea than in port. However, it appears they went south/southwest trying to cut inside the storm's track... when they probably should have gone northeast. (But I don't know what may have been waiting for them in the North Atlantic. It can be nasty this time of year.)

    • by mcgrew (92797) *

      The original HMS Bounty didn't have the benefit of knowing a week in advance when a hurricane was coming. This one did. WTF were they even at sea for?

      As the captain said and every single news article about it quotes him, in a hurricane a ship is safer at sea than in port. They were trying to get the ship out of harm's way, but this hurricane was WAY bigger than most, 2000 miles wide.

  • ...appears to have upheld the highest traditions of the sea. In the past couple of decades there have been at least two Mediterranean cruise ship skippers who can't say that.

    Not a religious guy, but...

    Hear us as we cry to thee,
    For those in peril on the sea.

  • No Daily Show. Now how will I get my news?

  • Does anywone know why the boat was out? Seems like a bad time to sail in replica boat.
    • Nevermind, It looks like they were trying to save the ship by sailing it east St. Petersburg.

      Bounty's current voyage is a calculated decision... NOT AT ALL... irresponsible or with a lack of foresight as some have suggested. The fact of the matter is... A SHIP IS SAFER AT SEA THAN IN PORT!

      Safer for the ship. The dead crew would have been safer in their beds on land.

      • by JustOK (667959)

        depends on where their beds were.

      • by vlm (69642)

        Safer for the ship. The dead crew would have been safer in their beds on land.

        Nah, their beds would be underwater due to the surge and they'd be drowned. If you gotta evac one way or another, you should do what you do best, and what sailors do best is sail, so...

    • I heard it was headed to Clearwater, FL where it spends its winters. Unfortunately, it's not a fast moving boat.
  • Huffington Post (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Edzor (744072) on Tuesday October 30, 2012 @10:14AM (#41817487) Journal
    I think the Huffington Post managers would be more worried if a real media website went down like the NYT. Where would they steal - sorry aggregate - their content from then!
  • I read the title and all I got to say is that its a damn shame about the HMS Bounty.
  • by geekoid (135745) <dadinportland AT yahoo DOT com> on Tuesday October 30, 2012 @10:15AM (#41817507) Homepage Journal

    that said this storm wasn't going to be anything and were criticizing people getting prepared in the 'Sandy' story the other day? hmm? I expect you are apologizing and have learned your lesson~

    • by Daetrin (576516)
      I particularly "liked" this guy [slashdot.org] who was complaining about how nice the weather in Virginia hours before the storm was supposed to make landfall. I don't know how much it was directly affected by the first part of the hurricane, but according to the news last night Virginia was one of the states being affected by the blizzards spawned by the hybrid storm, so i doubt the weather is quit so nice there by this point.
  • "Several news sites are reporting that the 1962 replica of the HMS bounty was lost at sea due to hurricane Sandy, about 90 miles off North Carolina."

    Are they certain this wasn't the result of a mutiny?

  • It wasn't in the Royal Navy, and it was clearly registered as Bounty...
    • it was a replica of the HMS Bounty, and is popularly called as such. the world doesn't care about royal navy registration and can put HMS in front of anything they please.

      • by Coisiche (2000870)

        I think that the Royal Navy might get slightly miffed about people doing that. Whether or not they could do anything about it is another matter. British Armed forces probably don't get much of a legal budget for pursuing these things.

  • I've been stuck in my apartment, constantly online, with blankets on my windows... actually, things aren't much different from every other day. Only when I peek outside, it's raining.
  • by paiute (550198)
    I just took some pictures of her when she was hauled out of the water in Boothbay Harbor, a couple of weeks ago. I was joking that the modern sailor was spoiled, as there was no seat of ease visible at the bow.
  • Not at all, this is the first I've heard of it. But I have also been working way to much the last few days to find time to browse news sites.

  • by Overzeetop (214511) on Tuesday October 30, 2012 @10:58AM (#41818083) Journal

    Dear lifehacker readers - what is the best way you've found to make sure a site remains available during a natural disaster?
    -Adam Pash

    • The Gawker sites have backup blogs that are now up. Gawker is at http://live.gawker.com/ [gawker.com] Lifehacker is at http://live.lifehacker.com/ [lifehacker.com] and so on. They seem to have already thought of a backup plan, albeit not a complete one.

      Questions about site backup should be sent to Gizmodo, anyhow.

    • by dingen (958134)

      I'm really amazed large websites such as the Gawker blogs and the Huffington Post are all hosted in a single data center.

      Isn't this the age of the cloud and everything? I would have thought they'd simply serve from another location while the NY host is down, but apparently it's not set up in such a way that that is easily done.

      Could Slashdot be wiped out by a single power failure as well?

      • by SecurityGuy (217807) on Tuesday October 30, 2012 @12:01PM (#41818819)

        This is the age of putting things in the "cloud" and forgetting that cloud is just someone else's data center(s). If you pay for services sufficient to stay online if the entire northeastern US goes offline, you at the very least get to sue your provider and probably win when it doesn't work. If you periodically go into your datacenter, er, "cloud" and flip the breaker and listen to all the fans die and your backup site X thousand miles away seamlessly takes over, you stand a really good chance of actually weathering a storm like this.

        The people who are down didn't necessarily do it wrong. They may have made a quite rational decision that the cost of fully redundant geographically dispersed backup infrastructure and live failover testing is greater than the expected cost of downtime when you factor in the probability of it happening. If they didn't think about it, or just assumed their provider wouldn't screw it up and are now running around wetting their pants, then yeah, they did it wrong.

  • by Sez Zero (586611) on Tuesday October 30, 2012 @12:13PM (#41818959) Journal

    ...wind and water surges knocked off Gawker sites...

    And nothing of value was lost.

"And do you think (fop that I am) that I could be the Scarlet Pumpernickel?" -- Looney Tunes, The Scarlet Pumpernickel (1950, Chuck Jones)

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